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So ... you wanna buy / just bought a 1st Gen Tundra, eh?

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by shifty`, Nov 14, 2022.

  1. Nov 14, 2022 at 7:50 PM
    #1
    shifty`

    shifty` [OP] call-response overturns conviction every time

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Member:
    #48239
    Messages:
    20,744
    ATL
    Vehicle:
    '06 AC Limited V8/4WD
    (see signature for truck info)
    The "what should I look out for?" question comes up way too often. To avoid help re-typing / copy-pasting the same canned responses repeatedly, after collective discussing, some of us decided to make this thread. The first couple replies here cover what most folks you need to know.

    There's a good chance a forum regular linked you here for help. If you're new, welcome to Tundras.com, stick around, but be sure to read the very brief Code of Conduct.

    So you just bought a 1st Gen Tundra, or you're thinking about it, eh?

    There's general things you should know, a few quirks and anomalies, plus several topics that tend to generate new repetitive posts. This list will be updated semi-regularly.

    Before diving in, know there's a ton of resources here. The Search feature will help find a lot of it. Some technical data is archived, like wiring diagrams (Tundra, Sequoia), Owner's manuals, Service manuals, Maintenance info, brochures and major features by year, a crash book for parts, keyless entry programming info, torque specs, plus common TSBs and a instructional docs linked below. There's even a thread on finding/ordering OEM parts direct from Toyota w/substantial discount here.

    When buying or hunting for a 1GT truck, there's one single most-important thing to know:

    FRAME RUST, FRAME RUST, FRAME RUST!

    • NEVER buy a 1GT without thoroughly and I mean thoroughly inspecting the frame. Can't stress it enough. Too many come to Tundras.com after being screwed by shady sellers, gaping holes in frames, cracked frames, can't pass inspection, all b/c they didn't know to scrutinize their frame. Some bought online w/o seeing the frame, seller claimed "southern truck", left the buyer stuck w/loss or lawsuit. If you choose to buy w/o poring over the frame, nobody to blame but yourself! Few frame repair parts exist, DIY repairs add up, DIY frame swaps are tedious/expensive.
    • The above is true regardless where you buy the truck or where sellers say it lived. We've seen California- and Arizona-sold truck frames rusted out b/c previous owners commuted to, adventured in, or worked in Utah, for example. Look for rust where the X-shaped crossmember over the spare tire meets the long framerails. Check shock and leaf spring mounts. Check inside both framerails under the cab, where Toyota riveted in extra frame stiffeners, make sure they're not warped/flaking. Bring a hammer and tap away. If you see significant rust, BAIL (or post ample pics in a new thread asking if it's bad).
    • There was a frame recall on earlier models. Toyota is still replacing frames but ONLY IF a previous owner didn't have Toyota to coat their frames (that helped frames rust inside-out). Check the frame recall info thread for info.
    • Beware of lipstick on pig! Shiny black frames are an instant red flag for cover-up! Frames should be hazy/dull/eggshell black, not shiny. Smooth metal, no bumps or pimples. Even the original dealer-applied coatings dull after a few years. No reason for a shiny frame unless it was replaced recently.
    • Another red flag: Rust on bolts/clamps in the engine bay. It's common to see on trucks from road-salted areas.
    • Check all four cab mounts for rust. It's possible (not "easy") to replace cab mounts. This thread may help on replacement.
    • Before you ask in the forum ... "What does it cost for/what's involved with/how could I frame swap..." To start, you need to check the "cab types" section of this post for info on selecting correct frames, frame differences. This is what you can expect work-wise, if DIY. Cost-wise, for DIY, you'll be out of pocket the cost of the frame, any specialty tools, and any parts you break / replace during swap, avg. cost is probably $2k-$3k. That's similar to what you'll pay Toyota replacing the frame under recall. If you have the dealership do it outside of recall, you're looking at minimum $10k-12k and we've seen quotes as high as $17k. If you can find a legit shop capable to swap frames, after labor and everything else, I'd ballpark $6k-$8k. In other words: If you aren't capable of swapping the frame yourself, you're better off just finding another truck.

    Important considerations for mileage/engine related stuff
    • These aren't your average trucks, they easily go 400k-500k+ miles without any rebuilding, just regular maintenance. It's not a Ford, Dodge, or GM truck. You shouldn't need to worry about replacing the transmission after 100k miles, or even 200k or 300k, nor rebuild the engine after the same. Regular maintenance is king, look for service records, get as much history as you can. DO NOT be super concerned of what would most normally consider "high" mileage. It's perfectly normal to buy a 1GT with 200k-300k miles on it.
    • To that point, DO be somewhat concerned about LOW mile 'grandpa'/'virgin' trucks. Low mileage is NOT necessarily a 'good' thing, and you'd be wise to NOT seek out sub-100k mile trucks. Why? At the ripe age of 15-20 years old, your realistic 'break-in' range for these trucks is around the 125k-175k miles, i.e. at least 8k-10k miles per year. Believe me, I bought a 62k mile truck, some other members at 30k-90k miles. Many who dared show under their valve covers found varnish at best, full-on sludge at at worst (example) (example) (example). Meanwhile, the guys with 200k-400k miles have nice, silver, shiny, pristine heads (example). Bottom line: Engines hate short-trip driving. Short-trip driving is exactly how a 15-20 year old truck gets under 125k miles on it. Short-trip-driven vehicles often have problems of neglect/atrophy: shrunken gaskets & seals, charred or varnished heads, sometimes crusty wiring & internals ... while the rest looks pristine. Expect typical low-mile leaks, expect to replace cam seals and valve cover gaskets, and depending on what you find, you may need to do short-interval oil change cycles or gasket-safe flushes to clean up sludge and varnish.
    • TIMING BELT. This is huge. The 2UZ-FE specifically is a low-interference engine. If it snaps, above idle/low RPM, the engine may become a boat anchor. Toyota recommends changing @ 9yrs or 90k miles. Sure, you may eek out 100k, 120k, 10-15 years w/o change. Hell, we've seen some make it 200k on what could be the original. However, we've also seen members w/barely 100k snap the original belt. Do yourself a favor, take a 10mm ratchet to loosen & look behind a timing cover, inspect the belt. If you find cracks, don't drive, it may be your last ride on that engine. Don't trust belt change stickers under the hood on new-to-you trucks, take 5mins to verify the belt. Those stickers cost $1-2 online, anyone can slap one on as a selling point. Belt change videos for DIY'ers are here. Shops charge $1k-2k parts & labor to to replace w/new-OEM brand (Toyota/AISIN). Aim for mechanics specializing in Toyota, dealerships charge anywhere 20%-40% more than a private shop. Don't use non-OEM parts here, and change the water pump, pulleys, tensioner while in there.
    • There was an issue in the earlier models (00-02?) with the planetary gear grenading if you tow in OD. This is rare, but it has happened enough a thread or two around here exists (one example). Tundras aren't the only Toyota model impacted by similar issues.

    Cab types and why it matters:
    • There are 3 cab types for the 1GT: Access Cab ("AC"), Regular Cab ("RC"), Double Cab ("DC"). This is such a key piece of info when asking for advice or help, so be sure you update the truck info in your forum user profile to indicate which cab type you have (and engine, and drivetrain). It'll help others more-easily help you and give advice.
    • DC trucks didn't come into existence until late 2003 for the 2004 model year.
    • AC trucks were the only ones offered with a stepside bed, starting in late 2002 for the 2003 year. DC and RC trucks never got one. Bed sizes are different between AC/RC/DC, so this isn't an interchangeable thing. More on bed sizes a few points down.
    • RC/AC trucks are very similar to one another frame-wise, door-wise, fender/headlight/bumper-wise, fender flares, bedsides, and in many other ways - lots of interchangeable parts. DC trucks are more closely related to the Sequoia, sharing many same part/body characteristics, and the DC has a taller bedside, which may be a consideration for those with accessibility issues. Frames, doors, beds, headlights, and many other parts DO NOT interchange between DC trucks and their AC/RC counterparts.
    • Frame-wise, AC and RC can interchange as long as the engine/drivetrain matches. If your DC frame is rusted out, you're stuck hunting for another DC frame with the same drivetrain.
    • Rear axle shot, and you need to get a replacement? Stick with your general year and cab type. The DC axle housing is is different width than AC/RC. Likewise, the Sequoia rear has discs and different provisions. This can make replacing your rear axle housing a bit tricky.
    • A lot of wiring differs between the cab types and based on your factory options.
    • RC didn't come with a rear power window. Some AC came with a 3pc horizontal slider. DC/Sequoia is the only model with a rear 1pc vertical power window. Likewise, only DC/Sequoia came with sunroof.
    • The overhead console that has time/outside temperature and/or compass. is another DC-exclusive. NO, that overhead console won't fit in an AC or RC truck without significantly modifying the headliner (at least) and rewiring your truck from the fusebox to roof. If you have a DC but no overhead console, the wiring for that special console may be tucked up in your headliner, check for it!
    • Some DC trucks (but not AC/RC) came pre-wired for an auto-dimming rearview, like the Sequoia. That being said, if you want to add an auto-dimming mirror, with compass, HomeLink garage door opener, outside temp, or whatever else, this post should direct you to necessary details/pictures you need. DC owners may have the wiring tucked into the headliner above the console opening. You may find the temp sensor wiring on the firewall as seen in that post above. AC/RC cab owners need to retrofit; there are OEM harnesses available, but the kits aren't plug 'n play...
    • RC trucks have a short cab and long bed. AC trucks have a longer cab and shorter bed (6'4"). DC trucks have an extra long cab and shortest bed (6'2"). Obviously, this means caps/shells/campers and tonneau covers ARE NOT truly interchangeable between the AC/RC/DC.
    • Suspension and wheel/tire offerings fit differently between AC/RC and the DC. If you install the lift you saw on your favorite DC truck into your AC/RC you likely WILL NOT get the same result. Your AC/RC truck is lighter, slightly different suspension, thus you'll see more lift, possibly over-extending and damaging stuff or leaving you with serious squat issues. Likewise, for wheels/tires, DC trucks seem to rub more easily than AC/RC trucks with 32.5 - 33.5" tires (and larger).
    • Some parts, like steering wheels, wheel/tire combos, etc. transfer between all cab types and multiple generations. If in doubt, ask.
    • AC/RC trucks didn't use chipped immobilizer keys. Some DC and Sequoia did, not all. Sometimes a low battery for chipped/immob trucks can result in no-start conditions.

    Drivetrains available and other related info (including 4WD debugging):
    • You either get a V6 (2 types) or V8 (2UZ-FE). For V6 trucks, it was either 3.4 (5VZ-FE) in 2000-2004, or the 4.0L (1GR-FE) in 2005-2006. The '05-'06 trucks were significantly higher HP/TQ specs, added VVTi, a 5th gear in the transmission, and extra emissions via secondary air injection pump which eventually goes bad for everyone (bypass kit info here, DIY kit here). This extra emissions stuff is one purchase consideration, it's expensive to replace if you're in an emissions-compliant state.
    • 2WD and 4WD was optional in all models. V8 only came w/automatic trans, V6 had a manual option, maybe interesting. Transmission swapping to add manual ... yes, it's possible, one or two did it, it's a massive pain in the ass and may cost you more than hunting down and buying a V6 manual truck.
    • The '05-'06 trucks had a fully sealed transmission, no dipstick. Earlier years have dipsticks. Toyota originally said the sealed transmissions had "lifetime" fluid. Now they recommend flushing every 100k? 80k? I forget, you get the idea. Plenty here are running on original fluid after 200k+ miles. Best advice for service at any mileage: drain/fill a few times to incrementally add/replace fresh fluid. Don't bother with replacing metal filter.
    • For our sanity, if you have a 1GT truck, go into your profile here and update your "Vehicle One-Line Description" to give its year, V8 or V6, 2WD or 4WD, and what cab type you have. This saves us from asking and helps us give accurate advice.
    • 2WD trucks have no grease zerks on the driveline. 4WD trucks have ample grease zerks on the driveline and need to be lubed with moly-fortified NLGI 2 grease every 5k-10k miles unless you like clunks/jolts when braking and accelerating. Note the slip yoke's zerk has a special fill process. If you've got no history on your truck, this is one of the first things you'll want to do.
    • If you're 4WD and you want to re-gear, your front gear ratio must match the rear gear ratio, plan to upgrade both.
    • Also for 4WD trucks, Toyota recommends logging at least 10 miles per month in 4HI to keep things lubed, actuators firing, etc. Do it. 4WD is expensive to diagnose & fix. In case you don't know, DO NOT turn sharply on pavement in 4HI on a Tundra (Sequoia is AWD/Torsen, so it's OK).
    • If you have a LSD (limited slip diff) in the rear, there should be an LSD sticker on the back of your rear diff/pumpkin. If you see one, be careful which product you use to drain/refill. DO NOT use synthetic oil! Search the forum or ask.
    • ALWAYS test 4WD before purchase, 4WD parts are expensive. Throw it in 4HI while driving in a straight line to see it engage, all lights go solid, no beeps.
    • If you're reading this because your 4WD isn't working and you need help, check THIS REPLY for some helpful troubleshooting steps to take.
    • If you want add cruise control to your truck, check out this thread.

    MAINTENACE AND PARTS ... this is a big one
    • DO yourself a favor, buy OEM (Toyota/Denso/Aisin/Advics brand) where possible. DO NOT buy from scAmazon or fleaBay, they're rife with counterfeit/knockoff parts as seen in posts here. A great way to discounted parts from Toyota direct is outlined here. RockAuto gives forum members 5% off. Summit Racing sends 10%-20% off coupons with their catalogs. Advance Auto Parts has 15%-25% coupons for online orders with in-store pickup. The latter stores don't sell OEM, but always sell LEGIT parts.
    • Parts you should ONLY buy OEM, else you *will* eventually find yourself kicking your own ass: LOWER BALLJOINTS (bigtime). O2 sensors. Starter. Fuel pump. Cam bolts & sleeves (also huge). Lower control arms (also huge). Too many ppl ignored that lower balljoint warning & found their front wheel horizontal, stuffed into their cab. Don't be them. OEM pricing on LBJs is comparable to aftermarket, be sure to buy fresh high-strength bolts (8 needed) when replacing! Some aftermarket-is-OK parts exceptions HERE. But seriously, THE OEM LOWER BALLJOINT HYPE IS REAL, here's some proof, you don't want to be these people: , , link, link, link, link, link, link, link. If you're worried about costs of OEM, buy the OEM recall kit?
    • Toyota oil and air filters are about the best you can get. This is counterintuitive to how I was brought up, and not easy for me to type (sorry, Wix!). Toyota invested ample $$ ensuring their filters are perfectly mated to guarantee longevity of their engines, they want to uphold that historic Toyota reputation of mechanical longevity.

    Suspension, wheel and tires ...

    • NO, you probably won't be cleanly tucking 35s on a 1GT w/o rub unless you're prepared to drop a significant chunk of money on a proper 6" lift, to tub your firewall, cut or hammer pinch welds, remove your mud flaps, add wheel spacers up front, and still potentially rub somewhere. Yes, it's possible to do, it's just not cheap. You should realistically be prepared to drop more than the insured value of your truck to get there, between lifting, wheels, tires, and alignments. Buy extra insurance!
    • YES, 33s are very do-able with minimal rubbing on a quality 2"-2.5" lift. Look at the end of this section for specific brands and situations to avoid. Do you and your truck a favor, buy from a known, reputable vendor like Toytec, Icon, Fox, Elka, Eibach, or similar 'quality' name brand, any of their 'stage 1' lift kits are sufficient. After installing one of those kits, many members here with AC and DC trucks are tucking ~33s (either skinny 33 proper, or "near-33" with 285/70r17) and minor rub, if any. Seems the DC trucks tend to rub more/worse than AC/RC trucks.
    • MOREOVER, understand something: 2" of lift with oversized tires is a significant lift! I have roughly 2" lift with my Toytec coilovers, and I'm running 275/70r17 tires (32.2") and my double-digit aged kids have trouble getting in and out, it sits about 4" higher off the ground in reality. I'm over 6ft tall and need to use the OEM steps to get in. Most people with road queens or mild offroad, fire roads, etc. will be perfectly happy with a 1" lift and upsizing 1" on tires to 265/70r17 (31.6").
    • We also have members with no "real" lift, i.e. just a basic strut spacer (puck) providing 1.5" or so of lift and clearing 275/70r17 (~32.2") with minimal rubbing. Of course, spacer lifts aren't recommended for heavy off-road (collapse/crack risk), they're find if you just want a little extra added meat for on-road driving.
    • Wheel fitment (backspacing/offset info) ... backspacing/offset plays an important role in whether or not you're gonna rub when choosing larger-than-OEM tires. If you need help with understanding what ballpark you should be aiming in, this is a good thread to read. Gist: The best put year near the fender edge w/o rub on 8½" wide wheel is ~4¾" backspace, at 9" wide ~4.5" backspace. Popular OEM 7½" wide wheels had 5" backspace. You can run oversize 275/70r17 tires on 17x8.5" wheels @ 0 offset (i.e. 4.75" backspace) leveling up front w/minor rub.
    • Wheel fitment (caliper rub): If your truck has larger 13WL calipers, beware of caliper rub! 13WL is std on 2003+
    • Wheel fitment (from other Tundras): 2007-2022 Tundras use 5-lug wheels. In 2023, Tundras started using 6-lug axles again, but the hub bore is smaller (95mm on 3rd gen vs. 106mm on 1st gen), so they technically won't work unless you spend a couple hundo on custom-made spacers.
    • Wheel fitment (from other Toyota models): Anything from Tacomas, 4Runners, Land Cruiser, LX470 and GX models that are 6-lug will typically fit. Someone here is probably running it already, and pics of it are in the OEM wheels thread.
    • If you're new to suspension, and all the words people are using sound Greek, or you need help to evaluate what you've got, this series of replies may help to understand what parts are involved.
    • There are two basic types of lift: Adjustable and Static. "Static" is either non-adjustable, or it requires some disassembly to adjust (example: struts with variable circlips like the Bilstein 5100). "Adjustable" is typically a coilover, which can be adjusted any time, on the fly, to truly dial-in height as needed. Obviously, after adjusting your suspension, go get re-aligned. Suspensions typically settle after install, you may want to wait a bit before alignment, or get realigned again later.
    • Virtually every lift kit you see online is going to be geared towards DOUBLE CAB 4WD, its specific weight and geometry. DC 4WD (/Seqoia) is the heaviest of all 1st Gen trucks. If you have an AC or RC truck, and/or you are 2WD instead of 4WD, be forewarned, you'll get more lift than advertised on pre-packaged lifts! This is a painfully pre-purchase warning for any V6 and 2WD folks driving AC/RC trucks out there!
    • Extras... At 1.5" of lift or higher, you'll want extended swaybar links, Suspension Maxx sells, to avoid travel limitations. As you approach 2.5" of lift with 1GT trucks, you're closing in on thresholds of OEM travel and should consider extras to compensate. Examples: You'll want new upper control arms (UCA) to more easily hit alignment numbers. At 3" and beyond, you may need to snug up your OEM CV boots or get ORS extended boots or similar to avoid grease-sling or ripping, and probably add bumpstops, etc. There are a lot of considerations - think about it, or ask questions in the forum if you need a sanity check!
    • When buying new upper control arms, There are a few types, know what you're getting, read more here to help you decide.
    • For rear lifting, try to avoid using blocks (esp. if towing, axle wrap is bad mmmkay), consider an AAL (add-a-leaf) kit to get an extra 0.75" - 2.0" lift instead (*if* you don't need your overload leaf!), or many members have found a new ATS "HD" leaf pack was a very wallet-friendly way to get a solid, no-brainer 1.5" - 2" lift, part# 90-221HD for 4WD, 90-287HD for 2WD and it includes an overload leaf. WARNING: The Icon 51100 add-a-leaf kit ONLY gives 1st Gen Tundras between 0.5" - 0.75" of lift IRL! The Wheeler's offroad kit is a better option for 1.5" (ish) of lift. NOTE: You should look into buying an LSPV relocation bracket unless you want a lesser braking experience after lifting.
    • One OEM suspension upgrade Toyota offered for the 1GT was Bilstein, others got KYB. For "leveling" a truck and lifting up to 3" or more while keeping factory-ish ride, many people therefore opt for Bilstein. The Bilstein 5100s are a very popular choice because you can adjust the spring cup to different heights using circlips/notches to get more or less lift *if*using non-lifted springs. You could also get a bit deeper into the Bilstein line for more money, and go with the 5160 or 6110 line.
    • If you go with the more popular option, the Bilstein 5100, you have two spring options, either stick with your stock springs, or go with a lifted spring. If you go with a lifted spring, some online vendors will pre-assemble the spring into the strut at an extra charge to make it a bolt-in experience. However, whichever spring option you choose, there are limitations, like, if you plan to re-use your OEM springs, different cabs & drivetrains have set limits that aren't recommended to exceed (see chart here for OEM springs and notch allowances). If you choose to install taller aftermarket springs to get lift, such as any of the spring offerings from ARB/OldManEmu/OME, Dobinsons or Eibach, Bilstein suggests to only use the bottom notch/circlip on the 5100 strut to avoid issues (will probably offer a smoother overall ride). For a true-to-OEM-stock-replacement without lifting, either go with the Bilstein 4600, or get a 5100 and use your stock springs at the bottom circlip/notch.
    • If choosing a lifted spring on Bilstein 5100s, here's some selection guidance. A popular option is 5100s paired with OME (Old Man Emu, not 'OEM') springs. It can be daunting which spring to pick, between the 2883, 2884, 2885, 2886, 2887. From ample user experiences here on the forum, we know what you can expect: For AC/RC with 2WD, If you want to get near-level, go OME 2883, and if you plan to also lift the rear, go OME 2884. For AC/RC with 4WD, go 2883 for a sport rake, use the 2884 to get level, or if you plan to lift the rear 1.5" - 2" after, then go with the 2885. For nearly all DC applications, you'll get "sport" rake with the 2884, near level with the 2885, or if you plan to lift the rear, OME 2887 is probably your jam. With any suggestion given here, expect it'll take at least a few dozen miles of driving before your suspension settles. We've seen a couple of AC/RC people ignore or miss this advice, they wound up with Carolina Squat because they expected OME 2885s would be right for their AC/RC 2WD truck - it's just not the case, and a lot of vendors don't bother to inform their customers any of this, so learn from their mistakes.
    • Know many companies, like OME/Old Man Emu don't actually make kits for the 1st Gen Tundras, most kits are adapted from 4Runners and Tacomas therefore, depending on your cab type & drivetrain, you can really screw yourself w/too much lift, travel issues, or damage. It's especially true for AC/RC trucks - If a vendor says their 1st gen OME kit is good for 2"-3" of lift, that number is more for DC/4WD trucks, AC/RC 4WD owners can expect to exceed 3" lift ... and if AC/RC 2WD owners can expect 4" or more. Yes, 100% serious, we've seen it happen, folks here had to replace their brand new lift after. DC 4WD owners probably won't see this problem. DC 2WD owners may get more than advertised, but not nearly as bad as the RC/AC guys do, and you may not screw anything up, but be prepared. Note: OME is a great company. I suspect they're only doing this to avoid the DC/4WD and Sequoia owners from getting pissed if they didn't get a full 2.5"-3" from an OME lift kit.
    • Alignment numbers after lifting: This is important, if you want a roadworthy driving experience without eating tires after your lift, there's a sweet spot for the 1GT that's been road-tested and proven. Specifically ask the shop to aim for the following, per our resident expert:
      • For 'normal' or 'mostly freeway': -0.3 camber, 2.6 - 2.8 caster, 0.1 - 0.2 total toe (0.05 - 0.10 per side).
      • For those who like to corner faster: -0.5 camber, 2.6 - 2.8 caster, 0.1 - 0.2 total toe (0.05 - 0.10 per side).
      • Basically, get that camber closer to -0.1 if you're mostly driving freeway, but aiming closer to -0.3 may help offset outside-edge tire wear.
      • IF you are running SPC upper control arms: Some shops may be unfamiliar with this product, it allows camber/caster to be set from both lower and upper control arm, versus OEM, which only allows setting from below. My advice? Consider pre-clocking your SPC uppers at "C" before going in for alignment, or tell the shop that's installing to clock at "C" instead of "D" so you can max out the caster later. Possibly the easiest way to get there would be to max out the cams with the LCA as far forward as possible (front cams pointing inward, rear cams pointed outward). Use the SPC balljoint slot to get things in the ballpark, lock down the balljoint, then fine-tune with the cams on the lower control arms. On mine, with my alignment already good, I found clocking the UBJ at "D" puts you in the OEM ballpark, "C" puts you close to the numbers above. When you get it home, make sure the UBJ shim is properly in its slot, then confirm the nut is torqued to spec (150ftlb)!
    • This was said earlier, some lifts to avoid: Avoid Rancho struts, and maybe all of their stuff, the lower bushings on their 1GT truck kits blow out, fast. Avoid Rough Country kits. They're cheap as hell, and too many people have come here with damage or issues from the kits, which is unfortunate when you can pay a hundred or two more for a solid Bilstein 5100 kit.
    • Other things to avoid for moderate offroading: Strut spacers --- talk with a pro before mixing spacers with a lift kit. Skip lifting blocks, add-a-leaf is a better option, while a new leaf spring pack is ideal. As mentioned above, the "HD" springs from ATS are well-proven by forum members. If using blocks or strut spacers, and even wheel spacers, aim for steel vs. alloy parts if possible.
    Audio, audio upgrades and cameras...
    • I'll say this first: DON'T BE A FRIGGIN' DOUCHE! Don't be that asshole who cuts the factory wiring harnesses to install a new stereo. There are a ton of cheap plug-and-play adapter harnesses you can buy. Pony up the extra $10-20 for a quality adapter harness and don't cut your factory wiring.
    • Use proper wiring. Either butt splice, crimp, or solder. Don't use wire nuts, electrical tape, scotchloks, quicktaps, and other BS, they're garbage. If you must tap a circuit, use Posi-Taps to avoid damaging wire sheaths.
    • These trucks were fairly well-equipped for the era with three basic radio setups: (1) A JBL radio with external JBL amplifier, (2) a "premium" radio with external OEM amplifier, or (3) a standard radio with no amplifier. If you have the JBL radio, it should have the JBL logo silkscreened onto the radio's face and amp, JBL brands everything with their logo.
    • Before you install an aftermarket head unit, you must identify whether your truck has an OEM amplifier, you'll need to adapt or bypass it to avoid issues! Read this thread for more info on factory amp locations and what's needed to bypass it for aftermarket stereos. There are ways to retain the factory amp if you really want to, but ... just go read that thread and its replies. To see what adapters you need (if you have an amp) check this post. To see what aftermarket radio others on here are running, read this thread. DISCLAIMER: Confirm fitment of any part numbers provided here by going to Crutchfield's or Metra's website before you commit to buying!
    • If you're looking to stuff a sub in the rear of your truck ... RC trucks, you'll need to use a wedge box behind the seat, or an under-seat shallow sub. AC trucks, Q-Logic makes a dual 8" box that goes under the rear passenger seat, replacing the under-seat steel cage. DC trucks, any of the storage cubbies under the rear seats can be repurposed for 8" subs and potentially 10", several people here have done installs with 3 x 8" subs.
    • For AC owners, your rear doors have ample room for a 6x9" speaker, if that's your desire. As someone who worked in the industry, I'd take a 6x9" over a 6" component any day, I've seen guys do some pretty amazing stuff w/6x9s.
    • Steering wheel controls and adaptation... To answer all your Q's, check this thread!
    • For AC/RC trucks, the metal bracket used for the door tweeters can be repurposed to install any number of aftermarket components, example here.
    • Consider buying through Crutchfield, not only for the incredible technical support, but they ensure you'll have all the wiring adapters and install accessories you need to for the most-plug-and-play experience possible. Free phone support from audio enthusiasts. Don't hesitate to call and talk to a technical salesperson to lay out your system before buying! It's also free, and they're super knowledgeable, they'll guide you in the right direction. To boot, their pricing is inexpensive - doesn't always beat scAmazon, but you're guaranteed to get non-counterfeit, non-grey market stuff with full, no-hassle extended warranty and support, which Amazon can't offer.
    • For an example camera install using an aftermarket head unit, check this post.

    Lighting info ...

    • If replacing your housings, be sure whatever you buy is "CAPA Certified", it's at least baseline not-garbage product. For brands that are higher-quality and will last longer, most offering CAPA certified options, go with Depo, or alternately EagleEyes, TYC, and some say Akkon make good product.
    • If swapping to LED headlights or fog lights, the overwhelming majority of people have problems with high beams and fog lights working unless they purchase and add a resistor on at least one headlight so enough load is on the circuit - this may not be necessary if your headlight housings have the extra "teardrop light" in the corner of the housing. Problems have been reported with LED tail lights also, it's not just headlights. Some circuits require resistance that an LED won't deliver.
    • Hyperflash problems are common after swapping LEDs into the turn signals. This can be solved installing a Diode Dynamics flashers (avoid the scAmazon knock-offs, buy direct).
    • There are H4 mini-projectors available for our trucks, but you'll need to permanently modify the light housing, no oven-baking required, just remove the hat-shaped chrome shroud inside and install the light (detailed instructions). Likewise there are bake-in options for projectors. Check THIS REPLY for common headlight upgrage options, with links.
    • For interior LEDs... There's a breakdown of interior light sizes over here. For climate control lighting updates, see here. Dash gauges for earlier 2000-2004 models with replaceable bulbs, check this. The later year model's dash gauges had on-board LEDs and are not replaceable without soldering, color not changeable without sanding the rear of the guage face. REMEMBER: LED lights are polarized. If you install them backwards, they won't light up! If you have one or more not lighting up, try popping out, rotating 180º, and reinstalling.

    Seating related info ...

    • For tall people, you can get some added comfort using the SeatJacker product. Be careful of imitations. It's basically an adapter that kicks the front of the seat up. May or may not be useful for folks with power seats.
    • Yes, people have swapped benches for captains chairs, and vice-versa. Yes, it's possible to add power seats into non-power-seat trucks, the harness to make it a mostly plug-and-play experience is still available from Toyota, for now. Sequoia seats will bolt into the DC, not sure about other trucks, there's a post on that (link)
    • Heated seats, available in the DC (I've never seen in AC, anyone know if it's a thing?), is also possible to add-on, but there's a myriad of aftermarket kits you could buy also, anyway the instructions are here. The switching is normally done at the center console, but I think I saw there the switches may've become unobtanium recently. Best bet may be finding a donor truck at the junkyard with all the wiring and seat stuff intact.
    • Seat covers... OEM covers and foams are still available from Toyota but you're looking at $1,000-1,600/seat to do all foams and covers, or $700-900 per seat for OEM covers. There's no "great" aftermarket OEM-quality option out there, Richmond Auto Upholstery, US Auto Upholstery and ther places that sell on eBay are putting out an inferior product. For nice leathers, most go with Katzkin, or just take their vehicle to an upholstery shop, which can be cost effective depending where you are. For cheap cloth covers on your beater, (check this post), Coverking, Covercraft, and Carhartt are two semi-reasonable priced options depending which product you pick.
    • Someone has replaced their rear DC seating with Sequoia captains chairs, interesting mod, check that here. No clue if the Sequoia captains chairs will bolt up into the Tundra, but it's highly probably.

    Electrical stuff ... and keys
    • Yes, adding factory power locks and power windows into a non-power truck is 100% possible. Ideally, get pre-loaded donor doors with door harness intact and door cards that match in color, and gut them for parts, or swap doors. It's plug and play.
    • No, adding a full DC one-piece sliding rear window is not a bolt-in experience for AC and RC owners, the DC cab rear is different from the AC/RC cab. It may be possible to install the 3pc AC slider into a RC, since the cabs are similar dimensionally, but I haven't seen anyone try it yet.
    • A majority of these trucks came with keyless entry (at least). If you're having OEM or aftermarket alarm problems or and/or you're considering adding an aftermarket alarm, first check if you an OEM unit (more info in next bullets), then consult this alarm flowchart to decide if it's necessary. Aftermarket alarms can be the devil, a problem waiting to happen. It doesn't matter how good the brand, most start to fail or glitch within 10-15 years. I used to install them for a living (Avital, Clifford FWIW) ... been there, done that. It's even worse with modern offerings, take this advice: Stick with OEM, if you can make it work.
    • For OEM keyless/security, earlier trucks used Toyota's RS3000 alarm/keyless system, which had a limit of 4 simultaneously programmed remotes, and providing no warnings if you wanted to program a 5th fob. Later models used the RS3200 system. RS3000 is a bitch to program. RS3200 is much easier, but some Double Cab and potentially Sequoia used immobilizer keys, and a different programming process than you may find elsewhere online. RS3000 and RS3200 remotes ARE NOT interchangeable. Manuals for the RS3000 and RS3200 systems can be found here, and the 'special' programming instructions for some Double Cab found here. Always enter programming mode to 'clear' all previously programmed remotes before trying to add new ones, so you don't hit the 4 remote control limit! You can absolutely program new remotes on your own, there's a thread about RS3000 units here (since it's so difficult but read the whole thread), RS3200 programming is here.
    • RS3000 remotes have an identified issue where the metal contact under the bottom will scrape through the PCB and produce weird results, including shorter range (more info). Just be aware of this. If you're having issues and battery doesn't solve it, crack open the transmitter and inspect the PCB.
    • Some dealers, especially in the southwest, gratuitously installed aftermarket alarms from a company named "KARR" at a nice hefty 4-digit upcharge, even when vehicles had the OEM alarm/keyless system installed. These are a constant source of electrical woes for people and were often hackishly installed. The boxes for them are typically found zip-tied up under the steering column area, or shoved into kick panels
    • AC/RC trucks don't use transponder/chipped keys (immobilizer). Some later-model DC and Sequoias do. Just something to be aware of if you need to swap keys or can't start the truck.
    • These trucks usually don't have a ton of other electrical issues. Hidden corrosion inside the battery/alt cables happens. Sometimes, a couple thousand miles after timing belt changes, people will have startup issues because the crank position sensor wasn't properly tucked away and gets rubbed by a belt (pic). There's also a similar problem with camshaft position sensor under the cam cover, where the belt will rub through (pics). There's the rodent issues mentioned earlier. Occasionally, water leaks can send water down into the ECM behind the glovebox (pics), or into the fusebox inside the cab/dash (pics & pics & pics, it happens a LOT). Many drain/vampire issues trace back to aftermarket add-ons whether the owner knows they exist or not - alarms as mentioned earlier, brake controllers, poorly installed trailer receptacles, those are some big ones.

    Paint and paint correction...
    • These trucks used two different kinds of paint at the factory: Two-stage (base color + clearcoat), and single-stage (one-shot color, no clearcoat). If your paint is METALLIC, you definitely have two-stage, or base color with a topical clearcoat. If your paint is NON-METALLIC - i.e. there are no metal flakes/glitter in it - and the paint is original to the truck, it is almost always single-stage, unless it's been repainted. This is always the case with white trucks and usually true for black trucks. Why is it important?
    • Single-stage paint is ancient tech. It has a penchant for chalking if not taken care of. It can easily be corrected to full shine with some elbow grease, a good quality correcting foam pad, and a quality light polish. You do not need buffing compound in most cases, and wax won't remove the oxidized, hazy material. My truck is white, it had ultra-chalky paint; Griot's orange correcting pads and Meguair's Ultimate Polish combined with a random orbit polisher (6") worked wonders. If your paint is also non-metallic, and it's gone chalky, and you want to know whether it'll clean up, one easy, quick test is to put a dab of buffing compound on the tip of your finger, and gently work it in a small, 1" circle using light-to-medium pressure over an inconspicuous, hazy area of your paint for 30 seconds, then buff away with a clean towel. What you see after is what to expect with a polishing wheel and quality polish. If you need help with this, make a post showing us what you're up against. The links in my signature show what's possible, but I think this mid-polish pic says it all (my test are was above the passenger door handle as you can see).
    • Two-stage paints suffer from clearcoat fail, more often with metallic green or red 1st Gen trucks, mostly on horizontal surfaces like the hood, roof, tops of the doors and fenders, and fender flares. Only real fix is a strategic re-spray. Many videos on YouTube showing how to sand down to base color and use a 2-part clearcoat like SprayMax 2K to re-clear. 2 things to say about that: First, 2-part clearcoats *will* kill you without proper protection - it's not a joke! - and second, your chances of getting it right, with a lasting clear layer that doesn't flake or chip are slim, but it's do-able with proper prep and application.
    Camper shells...
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2024
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  2. Nov 14, 2022 at 8:10 PM
    #2
    shifty`

    shifty` [OP] call-response overturns conviction every time

    Joined:
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    Member:
    #48239
    Messages:
    20,744
    ATL
    Vehicle:
    '06 AC Limited V8/4WD
    (see signature for truck info)
    Stupid shit you don't want to do to a 1st Gen...
    • Don't be tempted by cheap lifts. Brands like Rancho, Rough Country (not to be confused w/Tuff Country) triggered threads by people who had issues with and/or damaged their truck using those brands. It's not worth the 10%-30% savings, considering you'll pay more than that on consequences.
    • Get those thoughts of "big lift on 35s" out of your head. Well, unless you have ample $$ to spend. These trucks are lift-limited. If you're aiming for more than 3" of lift, and you don't have at least $4k-6k to spend on the RCD or Tuff Country 6" lift kit or similar (NB: Avoid their 5.5" kit, knuckle spacers are a joke), this is probably not the truck for you. Consider Ford, Dodge, or GM? More info in the 'Suspension' section above. Most folks successfully rolling 35s here invested a chunk of cash, and needed to cut/hammer/weld to get there safely/correctly.
    • Skip "cold" air intakes and aftermarket cold air/oiled filter crap. You know, the stuff K&N, AEM, others sell. Dyno testing on popular YouTube channels proved Toyota's OEM filter produces more overall power than aftermarket kits, while also filtering particulate more aggressively, keeping the engine cleaner. Those kits may work on other engines, but Toyota really dialed things in on our trucks to eek every last bit out. Those kits may make more growl, feel more torque-y, but dyno charts tell a different story. The only dependable way to squeeze out power or pep semi-inexpensively w/o forced-induction is with long-tube headers, or re-gearing.
    • Use OEM parts ... i.e. Toyota / AISIN / Denso / Advics brands. Especially with electronic parts only order Denso/Toyota, esp. if tough to replace (starter, fuel pump), go OEM. ALWAYS order OEM lower balljoints!!! (and get fresh LBJ bolts), you saw the pics linked above, right? Toyota's OEM filters for air and oil are actually incredible, contrary to some may expect. Toyota designed their air and oil filters with longevity of their engines in mind, you do not need (and probably shouldn't) use aftermarket filters regardless how much you love Wix (my favorite) or other brands. Speaking of filters, believe me when I tell you it's almost never, ever the fuel filter causing your starting/running issue. Don't bother busting your knuckles swapping it out if you're certain yours is OEM original. 2005-2006 trucks don't have a filter outside the tank. So far we've seen one person who found the fuel filter was their problem ... and the clogged filter on their truck was an aftermarket parts store brand made in Israel, not Toyota OEM. Their symptoms were the engine bogging down under lead, which is also something that can happen with fouled plugs and a single bad coil pack.
    • Finally, DO NOT buy auto parts via scAmazon, fleaBay, WallyMart! Or any other vendor who doesn't verify or control their supply chain (Sears, NewEgg, Kmart also allow 3rd parties to sell). These vendors don't hold their own inventory and/or fail to adequately monitor incoming inventory for fraud, thus they've become persistent counterfeit/grey market part sources. Since they're failing to correct this, legislative efforts like the INFORM ACT and SHOP SAFE act are trying to force businesses into monitoring and compliance, but INFORM only went live mid-2023 and hasn't done much obvious stuff yet. Multiple members here and on the sister site (TacomaWorld) have gotten very authentic-looking, yet very fake parts from scAmazon and fleaBay, especially electronics like coil packs and spark plugs. Buy from a brick-and-mortar, dealership, or major reputable parts vendor like RockAuto, Summit Racing, or similar.


    Pricing...

    • Differs region-to-region. Prices in the PACNW and California run higher, like $15k - $25k range. Trucks with solid frames and 300k+ miles outside of PACNW can be had as cheap as $3k in comparison.
    • Outside PACNW and Cali, in our post-pandemic-era used value hike in late 2022, well-equipped non-base-model trucks w/100k-200k miles ran $9k - $12k if 2WD, $10k - $16k for 4WD. Obviously, some pay premiums if fully loaded, some pristine garage queens w/sub-50k miles sold on Bring A Trailer have sold in the mid-upper $30k range.
    • In my area (Atlanta), I often see Georgia-native trucks sub-$12k w/less than 200k miles. There's too many trucks out there with clean frames to waste time on anything rusted up already, it may take a while to source and require flying to pickup, but it's worth the peace of mind.
    • If your seller has no proof of timing belt and water pump replacement within the last 100k/10yrs, that's ~$1k in parts and labor to have it done right, with OEM parts. Factor it into your purchase cost, use it for a haggling tool.
    • Be wary of small dealers and internet auctions. A handful of people got burned there and posted their horror stories here. Do your own due diligence before considering purchase. CarFax is a viable option to verify where a vehicle was registered, telling 100% if it lived in salty areas. But remember, it's a very popular adventure and work vehicle, some jobs and adventures involve driving on salty roads. :)


    After you buy the truck (or sometimes before)
    :
    • Register for an account at the Toyota Owner's website: https://www.toyota.com/owners
    • Plug your VIN number in and assign it to your account so you can check for open recalls, register yourself as the person to call/email in the event of a recall, and see any dealer-performed service history, including any frame inspections, recall work, regular maintenance, etc. This could give you a good idea of what the truck's had done already, where it lived, how regular the maintenance may've been.

    Recalls, TSBs, and annoyances - there are quite a few, here are some big ones that generate threads
    • Parts availability: Toyota has discontinued some OEM parts, we've watched some popular ones get the axe just within the last year or two. There are other parts, like a specific "unicorn" brake master cylinder that cost a freaking $1000, and a booster that's also been discontinued. Again, there's a sticky thread for ordering OEM parts. There are also some reputable rebuild kits for serviceable parts that'll help you stick w/OEM.
    • Frame recall/replacement is available on earlier model trucks, check this for specifics on eligibility before you think about buying that rusty-framed truck you saw.
    • Lower balljoints: Toyota had a recall for some models, but here is a dire warning to heed: Always replace lower ball joints w/OEM (and use fresh bolts). The LBJ on first gens is a major high-stress point; Toyota over-engineered their recall LBJs to compensate, 3rd party aftermarket doesn't bother. You will find yourself in the hall of shame. This even goes for Moog, NAPA, AC Delco brand who had LBJ recalls! Note: Moog outsources many parts nowadays, the failed LBJs for 1st gen Tundra/Sequoia made 4/2020-5/2021 with Moog/NAPA/AC Delco branding had 12% failure rate (link to NHTSA).
    • Driveline "clunks" when stopping and going: For 4WD trucks, you probably aren't lubing your driveline every 5k-10k miles as needed, see this reply (PS - this zerk requires special attention, see reply #4). For later-year 2WD trucks, there's a TSB out, the tranny crossmember can crack over time, then bolts loosen & fall out. Typical symptoms are clunks when turning, stopping, going. There's a specific TSB for the 2WD tranny mount problem, but it calls for replacing the crossmember, which many think is overkill unless clearly cracked (example here). If not cracked, retightening with a non-permanent thread sealer has worked.
    • Touchy, jumpy, jerky, sensitive gas pedal / throttle: on DBW (drive by wire) trucks, the gas pedal can be reprogrammed. More info here, but read the full post before you get started. Some members found their gas pedal was far too sensitive from the factory. Some find there's an initial "dead" spot then the gas pedal surges dangerously once the pedal is 1/8 - 1/3 depressed. Some members chose products like Pedal Commander to "Fix" the problem, two (three?) members had scary stories to tell with that product, one with unfortunate results, it's probably best not to use products like that when you can fix your throttle. Use that link for info on properly cleaning your throttle body, and re-programming the gas pedal.
    • Lazy shifting: Yes, if this one got your attention, you're not alone, others have noticed also. When the transmission is cold or the vehicle is parked/off in the parking lot, a plethora of members have commented about a lazy shift from 2nd->3rd or 3rd->4th gears. Applying gas usually bounces it up a gear. This is not a sign of transmission failure, it's just a quirk seen in (at least) the later model 5spd auto 1st Gen trucks.
    • ABS engagement: A common complaint we hear on here is about ABS engagement. Sometimes it's just the sensors are coated in crap (rear ones) because seals blew out, or aftermarket ABS sensors were used, or the ABS sensors aren't mounted squarely, their alignment is critical. If you find all of yours are OK, check this thread out for info on how to dial-in your sensors AND fix a long-running ABS-engagement-at-slow-speeds problem.
    • Cracked fuel filler neck TSB for 2003-2004 trucks. See here. Causes P0441, P0442, P0446 codes. But also check the 'RODENTS' section two bullet points down for another possible cause.
    • 2000-2006 serpentine drive belt accessory squeal. Noise usually starts happening during cold starts, see here.
    • Door rattles and closing problems: For rattling doors see here for a possible easy fix. On front doors, verify your door alignment; does lifting and closing solve your problem? If yes, check your hinges/bushings in the hinges.
    • RODENTS: Lots of plastics, wire sheaths, etc. in these trucks use soy-based plastics. If you have rodents nearby, or you park outdoors regularly, it's not uncommon for them to crawl in the opening under the intake manifold, where the starter & knock sensors live, and chew up the wiring (no start, knock sensor circuit codes). Likewise, they love nesting on top of the gas tank, and they'll chew up both the wiring like this, killing the pump (no start), and chewing up the tank tubes/plastics like this (EVAP codes, EVAP small leak, EVAP large leak). They'll chew through the gas filler neck, which will also throw EVAP codes, like this. It's common enough we can share exact photos of it, and there are more where those came from.
    • Water leaks, from rain, car wash, or otherwise: Check this thread for the common ones you may find, the cowl leak into the passenger side is hugely common and very easy to fix.
    • Coolant leaks: Three common causes: One is the is the gasket behind the thermostat housing, another is the coolant crossover at the rear of the block, and last but not least, old radiators is another source. Here's a list of things to check if you're losing coolant. For repairing the leak behind the t-stat housing, check this out. For the coolant crossover tube issue, you'll likely find coolant at back of the block, near where the trans and engine meet, check this reply for video/fix. This reply contains links to three other off-brand/odbball leak cases. For radiator leaks, this is one example of a tiny one - always replace with Denso brand radiator, and know different cab types use different sizes, careful where you order, scAmazon especially tends to deliver damaged products often (RockAuto has a spotless record with forum members). Proactive radiator replacement is wise. The transmission line routes through the bottom of the radiator ... go look up "pink milkshake", it happens in these trucks.
    • Cracked exhaust manifolds: Common in the earlier model 1GT, lends to ticks, rattles, etc.
    • Strange rattle noises at back of engine, like marbles rolling around: Several people here and at other forums have found this issue where they describe the sound as loose marbles banging around. Then found their flex plate was cracked in multiple places. Ticking timebomb. Check it out.
    • Oil leaks: Two most common causes: Valve cover gaskets and cam seals - this is especially true on low-mile trucks, valve cover gaskets will shrink, harden, crack over time. If you see oil leaks reaching the oil pan, running down the dipstick support, on the heat shield flanges above the manifold, it's probably the valve covers - check the torque on the bolts first to ensure they're in spec, but be prepared to replace the valve cover gaskets and spark plug tube gaskets (see parts and process listed here). If it's leaking down the front of the block, with oil showing either side of the harmonic balancer (big center pulley) or behind the A/C compressor, it's probably your cam seals. Cam seal replacement is $$ and best done w/timing belt, however, ATP's AT-205 will rejuvenate the seals safely without over-swelling or causing collateral damage you'll need to fix later. Of course, the oil pain *does* sometimes leak, but it's pretty unusual, unless someone had it off for some reason.
    • Noise transfer to cab, ticking etc. - Steering shaft seal tends to blow out, see here. Ticking-wise, the injectors are pretty damn noisy on these trucks, and many complain about it. The ticking sound can be intermittent depending whether the engine is warm or cold.
    • Brake issues: Improper rear brake adjustment causes a lot of issues, including shudders, shimmies, vibrations, see here for details on dialing that in. If rears are functioning properly, setting the parking brake firmly and releasing 4-5 times in a row should fully dial in the rear drums.
    • Driveline vibrations. Believe it or not, are not normally caused by the carrier bearing or U-joints. Avoid trying to replace the carrier bearing first. Finding the correct carrier bearing can be a bear, and most people find it IS NOT their problem. It's normal for the carrier bearing to have play. Most common causes end up being: Lifting without correcting drive line angles, rear brake adjustment is off, tire cupping, wheels out of balance, driveshaft balance, never-greased driveline (4WD only), cracked or lost bolts in transmission crossmember (2WD only, see TSB above). Check those places first, but also post in the general forum before you replace the carrier to get ideas for other things first. Consult a shop that specializes in driveshaft work.
    • Dash squeaks: Squeaky creaky dashboard, noisy dashboard, check this thread.
    • Low oil pressure gauge (00-02 Tundra / 01-04 Sequoia): There's a TSB out to address the situation with the oil pressure gauge reading low in these years. Check to see if your VIN applies by reading the TSB here but before you replace the sensor, read this note too.
    • Secondary air injection P2445 code: For '05-'06 Tundras, there's a TSB for trucks throwing P2445 code for SAIP / SAIS when temperatures are exceptionally cold. The TSB document can be viewed here to see if it's applicable to your truck.
    • Cat inefficiency codes P0420 and P0430: Strong chance it's not your cats. Read why HERE.
    • Broken shift lever housing: This was stupidly common in the earlier trucks, to the point there surely must be a TSB on it. More info and part numbers to fix info are linked here (pics to examples there too, and up a few replies from that link). Some 2000-2001 owners are on their 2nd housing at this point...
    • Starting problems: If your truck won't start, or stutters, it's VIRTUALLY NEVER the fuel filter, as mentioned above. It's also typically NOT the starter, and also typically NOT the fuel pump. There's a wild array of other potential causes. If you recently had the timing belt done, check your crankshaft position sensor wiring harness - it's common for the loom to be reinstalled wrong, so it flops out and gets cut by the serpentine belt. Don't use aftermarket or "universal" relays. Make a new thread, honestly. We see 'no start' issues often.
    • That's most of the big ones... maybe more to add later.
    All that said ... come hang out with us on the 1st Gen forum. We're absolutely freaking nuts.

     
    Last edited: May 17, 2024
  3. Nov 14, 2022 at 8:13 PM
    #3
    alb1k

    alb1k Always Coming From Take Me Down

    Joined:
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    Left Coast
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    It's good
    Just the rubber. 17 years of heat, weight and oxidation. They probably would have lasted longer without my mods, or been relatively undetectable as beginning to fail. No obvious failure, they are just cracked and sagging. Only one alerted me with noise.
     
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  4. Nov 14, 2022 at 8:47 PM
    #4
    NWPirate

    NWPirate Tesla kool-aid connoisseur

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    Solid work @shifty`
    Looks Sticky worthy to me. :cheers:
     
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  5. Nov 14, 2022 at 9:14 PM
    #5
    805Tundra

    805Tundra New Member

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    Toytec Aluma 2.0, Camburg UCA, 5160s and more.
    @shifty` for president. This is impressive!
     
  6. Nov 14, 2022 at 10:28 PM
    #6
    HBTundra

    HBTundra New Member

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    Mag Dump of Intel !
    :yes:
     
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  7. Nov 15, 2022 at 4:25 AM
    #7
    bmf4069

    bmf4069 Yup, that's a whole ass truck in a dishwasher

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  8. Nov 15, 2022 at 4:38 AM
    #8
    Squatting Pigeon

    Squatting Pigeon Squattingpigeon.com Staff Member

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    I was just thinking the same thing.

    Damn fine information dump @shifty`
    :fistbump:
     
  9. Nov 15, 2022 at 5:06 AM
    #9
    Black Wolf

    Black Wolf Bigfoot Hunter, Sasquatch too, but not Yeti

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    TuwaPro rack, Z1 Offroad stuff, NISMO suspension stuff, FlowmasterFX Extreme exhaust, AIS, OVS, J&L can, other goodies on the way
  10. Nov 15, 2022 at 5:15 AM
    #10
    Jack McCarthy

    Jack McCarthy Truck repair enthusiast; Rust Aficionado

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    2F03A79A-ED12-4B52-A683-094B7A45FBD3.jpg
    6505CBF1-7DCE-4395-BB9B-4B96A36033C2.jpg
     
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  11. Nov 15, 2022 at 5:41 AM
    #11
    AleHole

    AleHole PNW

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    THANK YOU shifty. SOLID post as usual.
     
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  12. Nov 15, 2022 at 5:49 AM
    #12
    NyCSnEaK

    NyCSnEaK New Member

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    Wow that was a great read. Don’t have a 1st gen Tundra, but applies to my 1st gen Sequoia. Thanks for the efforts and please sticky.
     
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  13. Nov 15, 2022 at 5:58 AM
    #13
    alb1k

    alb1k Always Coming From Take Me Down

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    What a pain!
     
  14. Nov 15, 2022 at 6:24 AM
    #14
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol Brake Czar

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  15. Nov 15, 2022 at 8:25 AM
    #15
    tokolosh

    tokolosh Serial procrastinator

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    What is everyone using for cab mount bushings? Energy Suspension is the Tacoma go-to but I don't see any on their website.

    Great post @shifty`
     
  16. Nov 15, 2022 at 8:30 AM
    #16
    shifty`

    shifty` [OP] call-response overturns conviction every time

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  17. Nov 15, 2022 at 9:50 AM
    #17
    Tundra2

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    I would think OEM would be best. It's what I went with.
     
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  18. Nov 15, 2022 at 9:53 AM
    #18
    DesertRoads

    DesertRoads Telecom Guy

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    Thank you for the comprehensive write up Shifty! You information is extremely valuable and helpful!
     
    This site contains affiliate links for which the site may be compensated.
    #18
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  19. Nov 15, 2022 at 9:55 AM
    #19
    SharkDog

    SharkDog New Member

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    Nice work, Shifty!!
     
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  20. Nov 15, 2022 at 10:40 AM
    #20
    Outbound

    Outbound SSEM #2.5, Token AmeriCanadian

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  21. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:19 AM
    #21
    Jack McCarthy

    Jack McCarthy Truck repair enthusiast; Rust Aficionado

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    Nice write up, @shifty`!

    Now where’s the table of contents? J/K
     
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  22. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:28 AM
    #22
    shifty`

    shifty` [OP] call-response overturns conviction every time

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    I would, I just couldn't figure out a good way to create jumps in a single post. I don't see a way to create anchors to jump to.
     
  23. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:41 AM
    #23
    Tundra2

    Tundra2 Zoinked

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    There isn't a way to do that that I'm aware of. The only way I can fathom how to do that would be to quote each section you want which will make a hyper link, then copy and paste the hyper link into a table of contents you edit into the first post.

    You'd have to delete your post that you use to quote your op purely for aesthetics.. I'll give it a shot with this post.

    See here for the first attempt.

    And here for the second attempt
     
  24. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:42 AM
    #24
    Tundra2

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    This makes the hyper links.
     
  25. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:43 AM
    #25
    Tundra2

    Tundra2 Zoinked

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    It may not work out so hot with such a short post.
     
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  26. Nov 15, 2022 at 11:45 AM
    #26
    Tundra2

    Tundra2 Zoinked

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    Are you picking up what I'm trying to put down?
     
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  27. Nov 15, 2022 at 12:04 PM
    #27
    shifty`

    shifty` [OP] call-response overturns conviction every time

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    Yup, totally get it. I just wasn't sure how many sections there'd be, so it wasn't feasible. I've already added 3-4 sections in.

    I'll dick around with HTML anchors later, that's ultimately what the forum is using to make reply-jumps like you just showed, not sure if their code would prevent HTML tags, since you can use stuff like that for XSS and RCE/CI attacks.

    (nope, doesn't work)
     
  28. Nov 16, 2022 at 9:16 AM
    #28
    N84434

    N84434 In the Frozen Tundra

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    Will 35's fit on my stock suspension???:monocle:
     
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  29. Nov 16, 2022 at 9:17 AM
    #29
    Tundra2

    Tundra2 Zoinked

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    What kind of oil yall using??? Asking for a fiend
     
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  30. Nov 16, 2022 at 9:20 AM
    #30
    alb1k

    alb1k Always Coming From Take Me Down

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    It's good
    Oem is really good. All you have to replace is the cushion if your hardware isn't like Jack's. I got the middle and the rears delivered for about $81 / per from a dealer who had them marked down about 30%. Make sure to shop dealers even out of state - the prices vary wildly. 32% off and free shipping is about as good as it gets. And the phone price is generally higher than the online price.
     
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