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Timing belt master thread/sticky?

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Baller, May 12, 2022.

  1. May 12, 2022 at 11:36 AM
    #1
    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    I'm needing to do my timing belt this summer. I've tried to search for a thread with what parts kit I'll need and haven't come up with anything. Maybe it's out there and I'm not using the search function correctly. either way, I know Amazon has a kit but, I've also heard some people claim their parts aren't genuine AISIN. I was going to order from Rock Auto What's the most complete kit and do I need anything more than what the kit comes with ? Also, in the interest of being complete, what else should I look into replacing while it's all apart? Thermostat and seal? Besides the pulley/harmonic dampener tool, are there any other specific tools I'll want to pick up to make the job easier?

    Here's what I've put together so far.

    PMH's timing belt thread within his build thread
    https://www.tundras.com/posts/1917085

    Post from when I did my timing belt
    https://www.tundras.com/posts/2964488

    Parts:
    RockAuto kit
    Gates HD serp belt
    Serp belt tensioner
    Radiator fan clutch
    Fan clutch bracket
    Thermostat
    Thermostat seal
    Radiator


    Tools:
    Pulley/Harmonic dampener tool (Amazon)

    Crankshaft holder (Amazon)

    How to:

    1A Auto Part 1


    1A Auto Part 2


    1A Auto Part 3


    Another helpful video


    Toyota Tech doing a timing belt.


    Newer video from TRQ. This one has, by far, the best camera angles to really see where things are.


    What am I missing or what have I gotten wrong and need corrected on? If there are any better, more concise videos/tutorials out there, post the link. Better information is always appreciated. Also, if there is a comprehensive timing belt thread, post that and we can all forget this thread.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2023
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  2. May 12, 2022 at 12:14 PM
    #2
    shifty`

    shifty` Amnesia proletariat

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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2023
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  3. May 12, 2022 at 12:34 PM
    #3
    des2mtn

    des2mtn Third Member

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    Where my wheels stop rolling
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    I just performed this maintenance before doing a 2000+ mile road trip. I bought most of my parts through RockAuto. TKT-021 is definitely more on Amazon than what I paid RA. I went with the Gates HD green serpentine belt in PHM's thread.

    Radiator and fan clutch are good to replace too since you have everything apart, if they haven't been serviced before. RockAuto also carries new upper and lower radiator hoses, depending on the condition of yours they are probably good to reuse. Remove your throttle body and give it a good cleaning, also wipe inside your upper intake inside the engine.

    The only special tools I needed were to hold the crank and the harmonic balancer puller. I'm not even sure I needed the harmonic balancer puller with how easy it came off.
     
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  4. Jan 28, 2023 at 9:57 AM
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    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    Understandable hesitation with ordering from Amazon. Updated all links to parts from Rock Auto.
     
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  5. Sep 27, 2023 at 10:20 AM
    #5
    bmf4069

    bmf4069 Yup, that's car parts in a dishwasher

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  6. Sep 27, 2023 at 10:20 AM
    #6
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ Certified tow LEO Staff Member

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  7. Oct 14, 2023 at 6:29 AM
    #7
    rodm1

    rodm1 New Member

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    Where I can get the crank pulley tool like in video at 3:40 (last video Toyota Tech)?
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2023
  8. Oct 16, 2023 at 7:24 AM
    #8
    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    The one linked in this thread works and doesn't contact the surface the belt rides on.
     
  9. Oct 16, 2023 at 8:12 AM
    #9
    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    Yah, that's certainly a limitation of linking specific items to Amazon. The specific item and picture of it are still active. Along with a number of links on that page to equivalent tools, I'd think that would be enough for people to find there way to the tool they're looking for. For whatever reason, I couldn't find a crankshaft holding tool on Rock Auto. Probably my own inability to search correctly. Let me know if someone can find it.

    *Update*
    I removed the links to the auto parts stores because those were just cam pully holders, which are suboptimal. You want the tool that screws into the crank pully. Again, I couldn't find the tool on the different auto parts store sites. I'll keep trying to look for them and update if I find anything. I did add another link for just the crank pully tool.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2023
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  10. Oct 16, 2023 at 8:47 AM
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    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    Thanks for the help. I've updated with the part you've referenced.
     
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  11. Oct 20, 2023 at 4:11 AM
    #11
    bmf4069

    bmf4069 Yup, that's car parts in a dishwasher

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    Is this the right one?

    Screenshot_20231020_060941_Adblock Browser.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09DKHYXWN?ie=UTF8&pd_rd_plhdr=t
     
  12. Oct 21, 2023 at 9:03 AM
    #12
    shifty`

    shifty` Amnesia proletariat

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    As promised @bmf4069 here's more info.

    I bought the tool at this link for $21.99, and it I can’t tell the difference between it and the Schley product in cast/function, looks like an identical cast, but with added texture: https://a.co/d/3KdCYnb
    EDIT: If all else fails, search scAmazon for Schley 64300, trust me, you'll find ample knock-offs.

    WARNING: There are some BAD copies of the Schley product on scAmazon, be careful Like. Not cast parts, just a triangle welded to a circle. Totally inferior shitjobs. If you have the option for [cast tool] vs. [welded tool] always aim for cast metal, it'll be stronger. Look carefully at pics before buying, this is what you DO NOT want.

    upload_2023-10-21_11-52-10.png
    This is what I ended up getting (linked in 1st sentence above), basically someone in China took Schley's tool, made a mold of it, and is casting these knockoff tools. They're identical, but you can see imperfections on the surface of mine, including what looks like flaked coating from the tool they molded with - honestly this may be a knockoff of a knockoff, as crazy as that sounds. I'm sure it's inferior quality to Schley (p/n 64300), and is made with pot metal, but hopefully is sufficient to do the job seeing as Schley's tool costs 4x more. Schley's looks way nicer in-person though.

    upload_2023-10-21_11-56-28.png

    If you're not understanding how this tool works, this video will help. Obviously, you won't need it if an impact wrench can whing the crank bolt off, but ... in the event it can't, you'll be doing the same thing this guy is doing with a breaker bar in the 1/2" ratchet/bar provision and a breaker bar on the bolt. For the 1GT, I've seen people throw a breaker bar in the square provision and wedge it under the framerail or something to hold tension, so they can 1-man job it and put max torque on the brank bolt.

     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2023
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  13. Nov 27, 2023 at 9:13 AM
    #13
    jimf909

    jimf909 Battery almost dead...

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    Hi Y'all,

    I'm getting ready to replace the timing belt on my '03 4.7. I've read the relevant threads including the sticky (Thanks, @Baller - nice work). This will be the second timing belt for this Tundra (114K and 244K). Question: why do we replace the fan clutch and fan clutch bracket? Is this simple preventative maintenance given that the parts are off, they've given 250K miles of service and it's time to replace them? I'm wondering if I can save $200 by not replacing them. Has anyone seen a failure in these parts?

    Truth be told, I generally take a preventative maintenance approach to this stuff but these two parts make me wonder if they can go another 90K.

    Thanks.
     
  14. Nov 29, 2023 at 4:56 PM
    #14
    Baller

    Baller [OP] New Member

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    Don't take this as speaking for others but, it's simple preventative maintenance. If your parts still function and saving $200 is more desirable than the risk of failed parts, have at it. I don't think anyone here would fault you like they would if you bought your parts off Amazon.
     
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  15. Nov 30, 2023 at 2:33 AM
    #15
    w666

    w666 D. None of the above

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    Failure of the fan clutch can result in overheating, perhaps an inconvenient breakdown along the side of the road, and possibly head gasket failure if you don't react fast enough to the overheating. Not nearly as catastrophic as a timing belt failure. While it's certainly easier to replace while your engine is apart, it's not a huge problem to change later if you choose.

    The fan pulley bracket, on the other hand has only one critical component...a bearing. Failure of this part will likely announce itself long before it's a crisis, so not likely to leave you stranded, or cause engine damage. It is way more hassle to replace after your engine is back together, however, and zero effort to replace "while you're in there".
     
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  16. Nov 30, 2023 at 3:21 AM
    #16
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol Brake Czar

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    I probably need to think about replacing mine soon. What's the process if doing it separate from the timing belt.
     
  17. Nov 30, 2023 at 4:42 AM
    #17
    w666

    w666 D. None of the above

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    Something like this...
     
  18. Nov 30, 2023 at 6:56 AM
    #18
    bfunke

    bfunke Tundra Curmudgeon

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    I’ve only ever replaced one fan clutch over multiple vehicles and that was obvious when it occurred. I would leave it
     
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  19. Jan 22, 2024 at 1:03 PM
    #19
    jimf909

    jimf909 Battery almost dead...

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    Dead stock with oem 16" starfish wheels. We'll see how long that lasts. :) Topper of unknown origin.
    2003 Tundra 4.7 2UZ-FE Timing Belt Replacement Notes
    I'm adding a few notes to this excellent thread on replacing the timing belt. This Tundra has 245K miles with timing belt replacements at 142K on 9/27/2014 and 245K. I felt like I was driving on borrowed time for the last few thousand miles which wasn't any fun. This is a straightforward job and risking a blown engine by extending this service interval (90K miles or 7 years) is just plain dumb. :crazy:

    Tools
    This photo shows all the tools I used (with the exception of a 3/8” drive torque wrench, big 90 degree needle nose pliers and the angle grinder to cut off the fan pulley nuts). It’s pretty straightforward: screwdrivers, hammers, 3/8" and 1/2" breaker bar (mainly used to turn the engine), ratchets, sockets, extensions (wobbly comes in handy a few times), (very) light duty impact driver, HD impact driver, pliers, combination wrenches, flashlight, etc.
    • The big Ridgid impact driver easily removed the crank pulley bolt so I didn’t buy a harmonic damper/crankshaft pulley holder tool. Note: this impact driver would not fit if I didn’t remove the radiator, fortunately removing the rad is easy and I wanted to do that anyway. A subcompact impact driver would probably do the job.
    • Pulley puller: I did not use a puller to remove the harmonic damper/crankshaft pulley. As suggested in one or more of the videos I just used the two big pry bars and it was fairly easy to remove. However, having a puller available is a good idea in case your pulley is the one that's stuck.
    • Big 90* Needle Nose pliers: also not shown and super helpful in removing/reinstalling hose clamps. The pliers shown don't work very well on the stock hose clamps.
    • Hopefully you won't need an angle grinder for stubborn nuts.
    IMG_5341.jpg

    Gumption Traps
    Most of the work was straightforward. I ran into a few gumption traps:
    • One of the skid plate bolts was a PITA to remove. First I was lazy and rounded it off a bit so then I needed to get in there with some PB Blaster and carefully remove it. This was a problem mostly due to my poor practices while thinking it would be a jiffy to remove. Where's the dummy emoticon?
    • Electrical plugs: I still don't know the secret to some of these and have a heckuva a time separating some of them.
    • Fan pulley bolts: this was the only one that was truly a problem. My guess is that the previous mechanic just plain over tightened these. I used heat, long pry bars, etc. and finally resorted to cutting the bolts. Fortunately the fan pulley bracket and fan clutch were being replaced. More info here.
    Tips
    • Radiator: I removed the radiator because it's very easy, I needed better access to the crank pulley bolt and I just like more space when working. It can be done w/out removing it so it's your choice. Did I mention it's easy? Four easily accessed bolts.
    • A/C compressor: I didn't remove the rear-most 1 - 2 bolts or move the A/C compressor. Removing the 3 (?) forward bolts frees up the water pump housing as needed.
    • Jacking: if it wasn't for the one skid-plate bolt that I screwed up I wouldn't have had to use a jack or jack stands (my Tundra has a stock suspension). As in the one video nearly all can be done from above but I got under the truck quite a few more times.
    • Coolant dumps: be prepared for several dumps of coolant. I thought I was mostly done with them after removing the rad but there were a couple more big ones when removing the t-stat housing and another when removing the water pump. I shoulda known but laziness was winning that day. It did take more effort to clean-up than to put a plan in place.:annoyed:
    • Accessory belt pulley tensioner size: the new Dayco 89255 accessory belt tensioner pulley was about 1/2" smaller than what was on the truck (roughly 3.5" v. 4"). This seems to be known and the smaller pulley is working fine.
    • Timing belt tensioner: DO NOT PULL THE PIN until you're 100% certain that you're ready or have a vice to compress it. One vid says it can be reinserted using big pliers but that seems like it would suck. If you're re-using the tensioner be ready with a vice or forearms of steel.:muscleflexing:
    • Buy the Aisin kit! The belt I took off was not an Aisin (Mitsuboshi) belt and it didn't have some of the markings to line it up. This is mentioned in one of the auto parts store videos and I would have hated doing this job w/out those markings. Plus, my confidence in the Aisin parts is much higher.
    • I probably did the work over about 18 hours. I work slowly. I don't have wifi in my garage so I'd stop the work, walk to the house, watch a relevant video, have lunch, get distracted and then stop to eat dinner. The day is over. Repeat. Did I mention I work slowly? If I did it again I could probably do it in 8 - 10 hours, maybe faster. If I didn't stop to chase squirrels. If you need to get this done over a weekend, do some of the disassembly (radiator, fan, power steering pump, alternator, timing belt covers to get an eye on the timing belt) on Friday evening. Remove the water pump Saturday morning, replace the timing belt by early afternoon, look at it a few dozen times and begin reassembling. Put the final bits back together on Sunday morning (no church this week), add the coolant, check the ATF and put the shiny new sticker (timing belt done date and miles) on the firewall and give it a test drive. Something like that, YMMV.
    Supplies - don't forget:
    • A quart of: Toyota Genuine ATF Type T−IV (ATF JWS3309 or NWS6500), you may only need a few ounces.
    • Asian Red coolant
    • FIPG (formed in place gasket) gasket paste for one seal on the water pump.
    Videos
    • I watched many of the videos. By far, this was my favorite. The dude is straightforward and goes about the job pretty efficiently. Thanks @Baller.

    The damn fan pulley bolts that I had to cut off. Someone had tightened these beyond my best efforts. Instead of an angle grinder, a dremel tool would have been cleaner to just cut the nuts off.
    5AE93B10-90ED-489D-BA73-C970CA7FC264.jpg

    The parts pile:
    IMG_5236.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2024
  20. Jan 29, 2024 at 9:06 AM
    #20
    FishNinja

    FishNinja Hide Your Daughters

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    I use the straight pick for stubborn electric connectors. Find the tab portion of connector. And use it to gently push down or up on the tab while simultaneously pulling the connector. The connector will slide out like me on prom night

    IMG_4187.jpg

    also I’d recommend the chain wrench instead of the pulley holder thingie. They’re dirt cheap and do the job well. I used the Bremen from Harbor Freight and a piece of old belt to protect the pulley.

    IMG_4188.jpg
     
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