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Sound Matting - Detailed Installation

Discussion in 'Audio & Video' started by Netmonkey, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Sep 8, 2018 at 4:59 PM
    #1
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

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    2016 Texas Edition, 5.7, CM, MGM
    5100's @ 1.57, 295 55 20 nitto ridge grapplers, texas edition wheels (20x9 +50mm), TRD dual exhaust, TRD rear sway bar
    About 5 weeks ago, I installed the Tacotunes system 1B audio system:
    https://www.tundras.com/threads/tacotunes-system-1b-detailed-installation-and-reviews.29358/

    Since then, I have been thoroughly enjoying the system. The quality far surpasses the stock system. But I have noticed that the road noise at freeway speed causes me to turn up the volume. Also, the mid range gets drowned out at freeway speed. I did some research and this is a common problem that many vehicles have. A typical solution for this is to install sound matting material in the doors to deaden the road noise.

    So, I ordered a kit from Tacotunes. The kit came with all the matting required for the doors and the rear wall of the Tundra (30 pounds worth of matting). It also came with a roller and a razor blade. With tax and shipping, the kit was about $195 and it arrived in 2 days.
    [​IMG]

    Tacotunes has several videos that show how to do this installation on the Tundra:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxQpFK9L6k0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv6giV9UMog&t=932s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udp-tmx0Hus&t=676s

    The videos are great, but there are some details that are not obvious until you are into the installation. So, here is my installation...

    I unfolded the 9 matting sheets and laid them out so that they would flatten. The Tundra will require all 9 sheets. 1.5 sheets for each door and 3 sheets for the rear wall.
    [​IMG]

    Start by removing the door panel on a door. There are many videos on how to do this so i won't add it here:
    [​IMG]

    To properly apply the matting, all the wiring and plastic has to be removed from the door. The wiring is taped to plastic clips that mount to the doors:
    [​IMG]

    Using a razor blade, carefully cut the tape so that the wires separate from the clips. I left the tape on the wires so that I could locate where the wires attach to the clips for the re-install:
    [​IMG]

    Each door has a bunch of clips with different sizes and orientation:
    [​IMG]

    The videos show the wiring being completely removed and tucked into the door. Since I had already done the sound system installation, it would have been more difficult to do that. Instead, I let the wiring harness hang from the door. Also, I chose to leave the airbag sensor attached to the door since the sound matting was not going to go behind that sensor. This picture shows the clips that will need to be removed in order to install the matting:
    [​IMG]

    Remove the plastic sheet and the adhesive from the door. With the plastic removed, reach inside of the door panel and remove each clip by pressing in the 2 tabs on the clip:
    [​IMG]

    Next, put the clip back into the hole from inside of the door panel so that the back of the clip protrudes out. This will make it easy to locate the clip as you are applying the matting. The matting will have to be cut to allow the clip to be correctly installed. Repeat this process for all the clips:
    [​IMG]

    To make it easy to locate the screw holes and trim the matting, screw in the 3 screws into the door:
    [​IMG]

    This shows all the screw holes, clips, and wire harness plugs that need to be accessible after the matting is applied. Also, tuck the door cables inside the door panel:
    [​IMG]

    To apply the matting, pull about 2-3" of the backing away from the matting and then place it on the door:
    [​IMG]

    As you are rolling the matting into place and removing more of the backing, look underneath to verify all the locations that need to be trimmed away. Here, the 2 screws and the clip need to be accessible after the matting is applied:
    [​IMG]

    Here is the matting trimmed away from the screws and the clip. This matting is super tacky so the cuts look hacky. Oh well... you will never see it when the door panel is reinstalled :)
    [​IMG]

    After the first sheet of matting is applied (and before covering the entire door), return all the clips to their original positions and orientation. With the bottom portion of the door still free from the matting, you can easily reach into the door to access the clips:
    [​IMG]

    Here is that clip returned to its original position. Repeat this for all the clips:
    [​IMG]

    While the inside of the door is still accessible, route the door cables through the matting by making a slit where the cables originally came through the panel:
    [​IMG]

    With some of the access matting that was trimmed, patch the hole that the cables went through:
    [​IMG]

    Trim the access matting from the speaker hole. Be sure to save any extra matting:
    [​IMG]

    Since I didn't fully remove all the wiring, I had to hang it up out of the way so that I could apply the lower piece of matting:
    [​IMG]

    Cut another sheet in half for the lower portion of the door:
    [​IMG]

    Again, only uncover 2-3" of matting when pulling the backing off. This lets you easily place the matting:
    [​IMG]

    Trim around the speaker hole and the speaker mounting brackets:
    [​IMG]

    With some of the trimmed matting, cover the entire edge of the speaker hole with matting:
    [​IMG]

    All the matting has been applied, the clips are in their correct locations, and wire harness plugs are exposed:
    [​IMG]

    Reinstall the wires. Plug the harness into their plugs and route the wires to their clips. Use small zip ties to reattach the wires to the clips:
    [​IMG]

    By leaving the tape on the wires, you can easily see where they were previously attached to:
    [​IMG]

    The door is wired back up. At this point, I reinstalled the speakers and the door panel and then tested the speakers and door switches to make sure everything was put back together properly:
    [​IMG]

    On to the other front door. Remove the plastic, reverse all the clips, remove the wiring, screw in the screws, and route the door cables inside the door:
    [​IMG]

    At this time it is also a good idea to take a picture of where all the locations are that need to be cut out. It makes it easier when you are applying the matting:
    [​IMG]

    Again, a reference pic:
    [​IMG]

    All the matting is applied, holes are cut, clips are in the right location, and the door cables are through the matting:
    [​IMG]

    On to the rear doors. The rear doors are a little different than the front door. The circle shows where the wire harness comes through the door. However, this harness is also behind the plastic. Which means that it also needs to go through the matting:
    [​IMG]

    Again, do all the prepping to the door:
    [​IMG]

    After I applied the top sheet of matting, I made a small cutout for the wire harness:
    [​IMG]

    After applying the bottom sheet of matting, the hole for the wire harness is more covered:
    [​IMG]

    The rear door panel has a piece of styrofoam that protrudes into the door. This protrusion needs to be accounted for in the matting. Make a lengthwise slice in the matting and push it in about 1.5". Then, cover the gap with some of the scrap pieces of matting. Don't push it too far in or else the window will hang on the matting:
    [​IMG]

    Rear door all done and ready to be reassembled. Repeat the process for the other rear door:
    [​IMG]

    On to the rear wall. Remove the small rear seat, and lean the large rear seat forward. Since I had already installed the system, I also had to remove the subwoofer:
    [​IMG]

    The rear wall has a wire, a clip, and a plug. Since the inside of the rear wall is not accessible, do not remove the clip. You will have to trim around the whole clip:
    [​IMG]

    Left piece of matting installed with accommodations for the wire, clip, and plug:
    [​IMG]

    Right piece of matting installed:
    [​IMG]

    Lower pieces of the matting installed. Be sure to cut around the 2 brackets on the back wall. For the System 1B kit, the subwoofer box needs to fit around these brackets:
    [​IMG]

    At this point, I reinstalled the subwoofer box and the rear seats. I also tested all the door switches and the sound system just to make sure everything worked.

    Lastly, while I was in the installation mood, I installed the drivers side grab handle :)
    [​IMG]



    I took the truck for a spin to test the sound at speed and I must say that the system does sound better. You can really hear the mid range now and the subs are a little punchier. Even at a stop, the system sounds better. It is just a richer sound... not a tinny as before. It is amazing that the small amount of matting that I installed made such a difference. I can imagine how awesome a system must sound if the entire truck is covered in matting. But I don't think that I would want to do that install. As it was, this entire installation took about 8 hours. Doing an entire truck would take days.

    But for 8 hours worth of work and less than $200, this effort was totally worth it. I recommend sound matting for all stereo system upgrades.

    Thanks for looking :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2018
  2. Sep 8, 2018 at 5:07 PM
    #2
    ChrisTRDPro

    ChrisTRDPro New Member

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    Awesome write up, I can't believe you were able to it all in 8 hours, that seems lightning quick!
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  3. Sep 8, 2018 at 5:51 PM
    #3
    Sas

    Sas Humor is everywhere

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    Wow, helluva write-up! This is much more involved that I originally thought it was going to be. Thanks for posting this!
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  4. Sep 8, 2018 at 5:57 PM
    #4
    crochetjohn

    crochetjohn IG: sircrochet

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    Great write up.

    I have this on my soon to do list right now. I got a couple rolls of .80 fatmat off of Amazon for mine. Going to take a bite in chunks doing the roof, floor, back wall and doors over time.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  5. Sep 8, 2018 at 6:08 PM
    #5
    happyb

    happyb New Member

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    did you deaden the inner door skins?
     
  6. Sep 8, 2018 at 6:12 PM
    #6
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

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    5100's @ 1.57, 295 55 20 nitto ridge grapplers, texas edition wheels (20x9 +50mm), TRD dual exhaust, TRD rear sway bar
    No.
     
  7. Sep 8, 2018 at 7:14 PM
    #7
    SMK Shoe

    SMK Shoe Not New Member

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    Step Bars, Rear Swaybar, 2,000 Watt Amp, 2-10" Subs, new door speakers, De-Badged, Hondo vent mounts, Calipers
    I used "Kilmat" to do the same thing. it comes in 16X12 sheets. It definatly helps with the road noise. Anyone who is thinking it takes to long. Don't worry. Do the front doors one day and the back doors another day. then spend a couple hours doing the back wall and floor as far as material will allow. Doesn't have to all be done same day. Stuff I used was 50 square feet for 65$. Amazing stuff.

    Also, great write up.
     
    Sas likes this.
  8. Sep 8, 2018 at 8:32 PM
    #8
    Pudge

    Pudge Sap Wizard

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    Check out the website sound deadener showdown. Really gives a lot of info on how to effectively cut down on sound In your vehicle with a variety of materials and how to properly use them. You can save money,Time and effort to get the results you want by using the right stuff in the right places.
     
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  9. Sep 9, 2018 at 3:57 AM
    #9
    MikeyMTBs

    MikeyMTBs New Member

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    Great thread! On my list to do, as much as anything to help with the constant rattles inside the door panels. Great thread.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  10. Sep 23, 2018 at 2:41 PM
    #10
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    about to do mine. I already have all 4 doors stripped since I just ran new speaker wires on all 4 doors so I got the panels out right now. Thinking of grabbing some 80 mil Kilmat or Noico on Amazon.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  11. Sep 23, 2018 at 3:44 PM
    #11
    Squatting Pigeon

    Squatting Pigeon Mew Nember

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    Fantastic write up as usual @Netmonkey !
    I've got this thread (and your audio install) saved for when I put in the tacotunes system down the road. :thumbsup:
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  12. Sep 23, 2018 at 4:01 PM
    #12
    Pudge

    Pudge Sap Wizard

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    I used noico and thought the quality was pretty damn good for the price. Get a good roller and you'll be all set
     
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  13. Sep 23, 2018 at 4:04 PM
    #13
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

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    Thanks :)
     
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  14. Sep 23, 2018 at 5:27 PM
    #14
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    that's exactly what i ordered. already stripped the rear wires. getting door prepped for mat :)
    Infinity Kappa 6.5 going in soon ;)
     
    Sas likes this.
  15. Sep 23, 2018 at 7:11 PM
    #15
    trdprobped17

    trdprobped17 New Member

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    Both this and your other install thread, are the very best and most detailed oriented, step by step, install threads I have ever see. I tell you what, I have a full audio upgrade sitting in my garage, waiting to be installed for about a month now. I have been dreading doing it myself for some time now. But, after reading and watching your threads, I have all the confidence in the world that I can do it by myself and do it right. Thanks again for sharing, I really appreciate it.
     
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  16. Sep 23, 2018 at 7:16 PM
    #16
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    tacotunes YT videos are great too. plenty of details. Last time I did a full blown audio package was 20 years ago and there was no youtube or forums back then..lol..
     
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  17. Sep 23, 2018 at 7:17 PM
    #17
    trdprobped17

    trdprobped17 New Member

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    Yup, everything has a YouTube video nowadays.
     
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  18. Sep 25, 2018 at 10:25 PM
    #18
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    @Netmonkey any prep work like degreasing before laying the mats ? so far I just wipe down with a wet cloth and let it dry.
     
  19. Sep 26, 2018 at 3:38 AM
    #19
    Dabutcher

    Dabutcher New Member

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    I did my four doors with dynamatt. I still need to do rear panel. Sound deadening is great. Can’t hear my 8 “ BAM hardly at all any more. Good for my two dogs. Bad for me. Peace. D
     
  20. Sep 26, 2018 at 3:50 AM
    #20
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

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    i didnt do any degreasing. i just scraped off most of the adhesive from the stock plastic barrier. the sound matting has a thick, super tacky adhesive and sticks to absolutely everything.
     
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  21. Sep 26, 2018 at 6:26 AM
    #21
    speckmon

    speckmon Pow Pow please

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    this is what i was going to say, i'm surprised you went that far and didn't at least do behind the speakers.

    I also would have removed anything that's not needed off the rear wall and go the matting down on the floor while i had the seats up. but that's me, depends how far you want to take it. i remove shit just to stop it from rattling anymore from my M/T's...any matting is going to make a vehicle feel more solid though :thumbsup:
     
    B737 likes this.
  22. Sep 26, 2018 at 6:40 AM
    #22
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

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    Yeah. There is no limit to how far you can go with matting. You can do the entire truck, but the cost and the time would be exorbitant. I am pleased with the result from the single box of matting that I used. The amount of money and time that I spent was worth it to me. :)
     
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  23. Sep 26, 2018 at 6:42 AM
    #23
    Pudge

    Pudge Sap Wizard

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    I did my truck. But only covered about 20% with CLD. I used layered CCF and MLV everywhere which is what actually gives sound deadening. The CLD tiles are really for vibrations and rattles, covering everything isnt really needed at all. . There really isnt anything you can remove from the back wall, not that I saw anyway. I did some CLD under the styrofoam that's under the read seats, but theres already some there from Toyota that is probably sufficient in that area. then I went over the styrofoam with CCF AMD MLV
     
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  24. Sep 26, 2018 at 8:47 AM
    #24
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    got my Noico 80mil last night. will tackle one door today ;)
     
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  25. Sep 26, 2018 at 12:21 PM
    #25
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    alright got the 2 rear doors done :) thanks for the tips @Netmonkey
     
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  26. Sep 26, 2018 at 6:21 PM
    #26
    TheBeast

    TheBeast The Beach

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    rear doors. I also used the Noico tape to seal edges and wires

     
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