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Anyone Replacing Their Steering Rack Bushings w/ 35's?

Discussion in '2.5 Gen Tundras (2014-2021)' started by InfernoPRO, Feb 1, 2020.

  1. Dec 1, 2020 at 5:31 AM
    #61
    blackoutt

    blackoutt YEAH BUDDY!

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    It says "Pitman arm and tie rod wedge with 1-7/16” opening" but I think as mentioned an 1-3/8" would work just fine.
     
    68vert likes this.
  2. Dec 1, 2020 at 6:59 AM
    #62
    Jeffro22

    Jeffro22 New Member

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  3. Dec 4, 2020 at 2:09 PM
    #63
    68vert

    68vert New Member

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    Like every other bolt/ connection on my truck the intermediate shaft is seized onto the rack. Anyone have this problem? If so what did you do?

    All the other bolts are out, but with the steering shaft still connected. The rack wont slide far enough to the passenger side to gain access to the drivers side bushing. AARRRGH!
     
  4. Dec 4, 2020 at 6:10 PM
    #64
    InfernoPRO

    InfernoPRO [OP] Technicolor BASTRD

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    That bolt should not be very tight. I did spray all my bolts with PB Blast first.
     
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  5. Dec 4, 2020 at 6:51 PM
    #65
    68vert

    68vert New Member

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    You are correct, the bolt was not very tight. After I got that loose and spread the clamp apart, still couldnt separate steering shaft from the rack. Seized somewhere inside where the splined steering rack shaft inserts into the shaft collar.....
     
  6. Dec 4, 2020 at 8:53 PM
    #66
    InfernoPRO

    InfernoPRO [OP] Technicolor BASTRD

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    The whole linkage was very loose for me. I would think jiggling the steering wheel would get it free. One member did have an issue with rotating his steering wheel too much and breaking something, but I never had issues with slight movement in the wheel
     
    joonbug likes this.
  7. Dec 6, 2020 at 4:04 PM
    #67
    yoshi82

    yoshi82 New Member

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    3in ToYtech lift on Tundra and 2.5in in the rear. Tow Mirrors. Toyota grill, and Front bumber. New 6in antenna. Repainted the stepping boards
    Have the same problem my 2014 Tundra on 35's. So I took it to a shop because i will mess it worse. So they told me to replace the bushing the transmission and motor have to be taken out. Have yall hear anything like this or they just don't want to do the Job on my truck? If any one has YouTube links on how to do it, can you post it? Also I check the web site for Energy Suspension and it only says its from 07-13 but i believe it should fit, what yall think?
     
  8. Dec 6, 2020 at 4:49 PM
    #68
    InfernoPRO

    InfernoPRO [OP] Technicolor BASTRD

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    The Toyota manual tells them to pull the transmission and motor to do this job. Show them this thread and see if they will do it this way to save a lot of time and headache. The bushings work for 3rd gen Tundras as well.
     
    joonbug, yoshi82 and chugs like this.
  9. Dec 17, 2020 at 6:16 PM
    #69
    68vert

    68vert New Member

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    Kudos to the guys that were able to do this with the rack still in the vehicle. After trying it on my back for a couple hours, I decided to take my rack out and it still was a mofo. Would somebody be so kind to verify my P/S fluid lines are connected to the correct spot? I was certain I'd remember but after a couple weeks back at work o_O

    thanks in advance

    DSC02194.jpg
     
    chugs likes this.
  10. Jan 10, 2021 at 2:37 AM
    #70
    TXTundra2722

    TXTundra2722 Pipe Hitters Union

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    I just did this mod and it's more annoying than anything. I think it took me around 7 hours and that's including eating dinner and running to autozone for a tool. I had a friend tell me before I started to be careful, because if you go pulling on the tie rods, trying to move the steering rack around you can actually rotate the whole system, or essentially pull one side (whichever side you grab) towards you (manually steering it). I don't know if that makes sense, because it's 430 am here and I'm kinda scatter brained right now. Anyways I measured from the frame to the end of the tie rod before taking it apart and rechecked it before putting it back together. I'm glad that I did, because I had pulled it towards the driver side about two inches. The worst part of this mod to me was getting the new bushing back in.....I felt like that took just as long as it took to get the old ones out..... which by the way, I did use the pickle fork from the kit mentioned previously and several good hits from each side and I think I had all four out in about 2 hours. I inspected the old bushing and thought they were really worn out because I noticed holes in it. I thought this was a fluke till looking at all four and they all had the same gaps that faced the driver and passenger sides. I guess Toyota made them this way so the bushing had more "give" in it when turning the wheel, (i attached a picture of the old bushing). Driving it around afterwards definitely gave it a "sportier" feel, just someone else mentioned previously. If you're running 35s, 37s or larger.....I definitely recommend this mod!

    20210109_213501.jpg
     
  11. Jan 26, 2021 at 7:15 PM
    #71
    Tundranator15

    Tundranator15 New Member

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    6” Rough Country Lift kit. 305/55r20- Hostile Alpha 20x10 -19, K&N Air Filter, A1 Auto Tow Mirrors,Firestone Ride rite airbags. I’ll proved more later.
    I currently have the same issue with bushings and will be using this write up to help get this done.I’m also dealing with replacing torn upper ball joint boots and replacing those with the MOOG K500018. Anyone ever deal or see this kind of failure. Just trying understand the why in it failing, could be just the lift kit or age of the joint?C9F424E6-191E-43EC-828F-F1356EBEE0D5.jpg
     
    yoshi82 likes this.
  12. Feb 1, 2021 at 6:16 PM
    #72
    fytedapowr

    fytedapowr New Member

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    Bilstein 6112/5160, CB +2 shackles, SPC UCA's, CB bumper shims, 35's
    I imagine having an oversized knuckle may have something to do with it if it isn't getting the same articulation as stock. Is the boot actually ripped though, or just seeping grease? Seeping excess grease is common and not worth worrying about unless there is damage being done or a lack of grease internally. SPC or JBA upper arms may be worth looking into. but that's a different thread.
     
  13. Feb 11, 2021 at 6:42 PM
    #73
    Tundranator15

    Tundranator15 New Member

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    6” Rough Country Lift kit. 305/55r20- Hostile Alpha 20x10 -19, K&N Air Filter, A1 Auto Tow Mirrors,Firestone Ride rite airbags. I’ll proved more later.
    Thanks for the reply and suggestions.They are just peeling from what I can see so far. Checked the joints for any play or looseness and none was found. I’ll just keep an eye out on them for now.
     
  14. Nov 2, 2021 at 5:56 PM
    #74
    Half Assed

    Half Assed me ne frego

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    Bump. I appeciate the how to.

    I'm about 90 minutes into it and I have the passenger side bushings out. But i also have the whole front end torn apart right now. I figured I better do this now before I put the bracket lift on.
     
    InfernoPRO [OP] likes this.
  15. Dec 2, 2021 at 9:29 PM
    #75
    SouthWestGA

    SouthWestGA New Member

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    So for those of us without lifts,is this “upgrade” really needed? How many miles do people have on stock setups with factory bushings being Ok?


    I have high mileage vehicles and would rather not make myself do something like this job that’s not needed
     
  16. Jan 6, 2022 at 4:46 PM
    #76
    sfelke05

    sfelke05 New Member

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    How much play is normal? Mine appears to have more than I thought there would be given how smooth the truck drives. I have a 2007 double cab 4x4 with 120K on it.
     
  17. Apr 11, 2022 at 7:51 PM
    #77
    Harold_Z

    Harold_Z New Member

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    So I am having the same problem, 6" lifts with 35s at 262k as today. Just got back from the alignment shop and the shop notices the steering rack is making a pop sound and it has a lot of movement, and I think this is the reason why the truck's alignment keeps messing up. I am definitely capable of doing this myself, called a shop and got quoted around $560 for the job including the bushings and they would like to take the steering rack out. I am debating if I should just buy a brand new steering rack assembly or just replace the bushings since the labor is going to be the same and the mileage on that original rack is at 262k.
     
  18. Apr 12, 2022 at 10:10 AM
    #78
    Rc23

    Rc23 New Member

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    for that price I wouldn't wait any longer - I was quoted almost $1600. With that mileage I would definitely replace the rack regardless of what truck it was on or known issues with rack failures that Tundras have
     
  19. May 5, 2022 at 8:16 AM
    #79
    kylerocker10

    kylerocker10 New Member

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    I already posted this in the steering rack thread but can anyone tell me if this much play is normal? Truck wanders a bit on gravel roads and I have to compensate more than normal with steering wheel on crowned roads. Everything else on front end seems tight and I have Icon coilovers ans uca’s.


     
    Last edited: May 5, 2022
  20. May 31, 2022 at 8:29 AM
    #80
    Rc23

    Rc23 New Member

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    I'm going to keep this alive and chime in on how sh!tty this job is to do. Finally had the chance to tackle this over the weekend and in my opinion it's almost worth paying whatever a shop wants to do this job.

    My first issue was the BDS bracket - others have mentioned it but why they decided to cover up the steering rack bolts JUST enough to not be able to remove them just cant be comprehended. I figured this was going to be the worst part of the job going into it but boy was I wrong. After some grinding on the bracket near the steering rack bolts and cutting one of the flats off of the bolt face, they will slide right down and out.

    Let me back up - Removing the steering rack bolts............Holy sh!t. I think the torque spec on them is 89 ft/lbs - Mine were about 289 and the way the hard fluid lines from the rack run on top makes it almost impossible to hold. After much PB blaster and much cussing and banging along with the handle for my floor jack on a 1/2" breaker bar - I got them loose. My impact wouldn't touch them at 140psi.

    The ironic part of this job was getting the old bushings out with a sharpened chisel to start and the above mentioned pickle fork set was actually very easy - I used a 1" standard socket on a 8" extension and a 4lb hammer to bang the top halves out - but it really wasn't bad.

    I also didn't see anyone mention getting the new bushings IN the rack and how much of a pain it is as well with the tight tolerance of the sleeve - I had to use the steering rack bolts and a spacer on the bottom to press the bottom halves of the bushings in without having the tops push out.

    If anyone has any questions on this feel free to hit me up as there are some small details not mentioned in some of these threads - plus its permanently etched in my mind.

    I'm venting but in the end the truck feels AMAZINGLY better and now I can get it aligned correctly.

    PS - I changed my alternator right after this to torture myself and that may be the only other thing worse I've ever done on a vehicle in many many years. I'm baffled and Toyota engineers.

    Hope everyone had a great weekend :)
     
  21. May 31, 2022 at 9:08 AM
    #81
    Half Assed

    Half Assed me ne frego

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    I did mine when i put my 6" lift on it wasnt too bad. I wouldnt want to do it on a rusty truck or one with everything else in the way though:laughing:
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2022
    Rc23 likes this.
  22. May 31, 2022 at 11:14 AM
    #82
    Rc23

    Rc23 New Member

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    Ironically its not that rusted - just stuck good for whatever reason - and I'm pretty certain the steering rack has never been out of this truck - even with the lift install. I'm glad it done and I also cant imagine why the factory uses those trash rubber bushings. My rack was moving a good 1.5-2 inches and now its almost solid.
     
  23. May 31, 2022 at 2:45 PM
    #83
    TXTundra2722

    TXTundra2722 Pipe Hitters Union

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    My post (#70) I mentioned this and feel your grief on getting the new bushings back in

    Screenshot_20220531-164340_Samsung Internet.jpg
     
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  24. Jun 1, 2022 at 6:30 AM
    #84
    Rc23

    Rc23 New Member

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    @TXTundra2722 I missed it..haha Glad I can share some misery.
     
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  25. Sep 21, 2022 at 10:31 PM
    #85
    Retroboy1989

    Retroboy1989 'Course it's 4x4!

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    This thread is super helpful and I couldn't imagine this job without the tips from the OP and others.

    Pickle fork for the win. Would not attempt with a punch alone. I had to whale on it with a 5lb hammer, but the bushings didn't hold on for too long.

    Driving the upper bushing out was easy and quick with the largest socket I could find that still fit in the bore. I didn't use my impact sockets because they have a bevel on both ends. Craftsman chrome 24mm (pre-china) did the trick and fast. Do not do what I did at first and try to use the back of the socket, it will just bounce off the center of the bushing. You need the relief side of the socket doing the work.

    Installing the new bushings is a pain but I found a procedure that works reasonably well:

    Using grease on both sides of all contact surfaces. (Edit: I like superlube synthetic grease when I install poly bushings. It's also dielectric and food safe so I use it for electrical connectors and the O rings on my home water filters)

    - install lower bushing (little to no effort)
    - install tube through bottom of lower bushing using a light hammer tap to drive it in flush (some effort)
    - do your best to install the upper bushing as far as you can by hand in the horrible workspace (impossible to seat by hand)
    - leaving out the lower washer, run the steering rack bolt through the frame hole and through the bushings.
    - install the new upper washer and the nut
    - slowly turn the bolt to pull down the nut and washer to drive the upper bushing home. (Surprisingly easy)
    - Remove the nut and bolt and install the lower washer

    This effectively uses the stock install hardware as a makeshift press for the upper bushing. The lower bushing is a non-event if you install it in the order outlined.

    The reason you exclude the lower washer is because you will need every mm of bolt length to get the nut to thread. The bolt is just barely long enough to pull this off.

    The damage:
    PXL_20220921_054317772.jpg


    I also broke my driver side wheel speed sensor. I was using a plastic deadblow hammer to try and seat my TRE from below so the stud wouldn't spin while trying to spin down the castle nut. I learned a new trick after that debacle. Go to your HW store and buy a handful of 5/8 ID washers. Stack the washers under the castle nut and start tightening. This allows the castle nut to compress the tapered fit right off the bat. You can torque your stack to 51ft lbs then back the nut off, remove the washers, put the nut back and torque it home.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2022
    kylerocker10 and Rc23 like this.
  26. Sep 22, 2022 at 7:53 AM
    #86
    Rc23

    Rc23 New Member

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    Great notes! I forgot to mention I ended up using some random size spacers I had lying around from race parts basically doing a similar approach to the washer technique.
     
  27. Sep 22, 2022 at 9:41 PM
    #87
    Retroboy1989

    Retroboy1989 'Course it's 4x4!

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    I did not have the right bolt/spacer combo so I had to make do with the oe bolts and use the frame as the world's heaviest spacer.

    If I were to do it again, I would have a threaded rod, nuts and various washers handy to create a very simple pressing tool that could be driven with a ratcheting box wrench.

    This information completes the write up in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2022

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