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15k miles Transmission drain and fill

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014-2021)' started by Joe333x, May 1, 2021.

  1. May 2, 2021 at 5:51 PM
    #31
    mb66l79

    mb66l79 New Member

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    No it's a filter, not a screen. That seems to be a common misconception.

    This should be deleted so no one can read it and think there's any truth to it.
     
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  2. May 2, 2021 at 5:54 PM
    #32
    Vizsla

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    Think calling that guy a “hack” is mostly not understanding what he is doing. Not flushing, changing from WS to Amsoil(or whatever floats your boat) without wasting expensive transmission fluid, while minimizing the amount of WS left in the system. He had fresh fluid flowing in, that’s the overfill.
     
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  3. May 2, 2021 at 11:25 PM
    #33
    Joe333x

    Joe333x [OP] Member

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    Made me curious to see actually what is inside the plastic filter, found a video where a guy actually opens it up incase anyone is curious.
    https://youtu.be/Y2f7dFNP82k
     
  4. May 3, 2021 at 1:31 AM
    #34
    RJVA

    RJVA Sorta new member

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    My truck had 158k on the original WS fill when I replaced all the fluid with Valvoline Maxxlife. Also put a Wix filter in. The original fluid was very, very dark brown. The pan had no large debris but the magnets were thoroughly covered in fine metallic dust. The transmission seemed to do well with new Maxxlife but had the occasional odd shift. I added 10oz of LubeGuard red. The transmission shifts great now. Zero strange shifts since adding the LubeGuard.
     
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  5. May 3, 2021 at 4:37 AM
    #35
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    Sometimes Toyota calls it a filter, sometimes they call it a strainer. Either way it’s not a part that’s in any maintenance replacement schedule that Toyota recommends.

    1CF85B5F-A4DD-4696-B00C-A52DD3E685F9.jpg
     
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  6. May 3, 2021 at 6:21 AM
    #36
    Mad Max

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    You have no clue what your are talking about. You will wear your transmission clutches by changing the fluid to often.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2021
  7. May 3, 2021 at 6:23 AM
    #37
    Mad Max

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    Whats in the lubegaurd? Friction modifiers to help the clutches work? Why would you need that? Because you drained the friction material out when you changed your fluid.................
     
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  8. May 3, 2021 at 6:25 AM
    #38
    hagrid

    hagrid Ich habe sie gespritzt

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    Good Lord, I hope not. Need to save money for fuel.
    This thread is sprouting legs.
     
  9. May 3, 2021 at 7:41 AM
    #39
    JohnLakeman

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    Yep...It's a veritable depository of vehemently-defended misinformation for anyone wishing to take some away for repetition to others.

    After draining the pan, he removes the transmission pan and changes the strainer. Everybody, especially Toyota, knows removing the transmission pan is a real bad idea. Then, he overfills the transmission by a full gallon, total volume of 8 quarts, until it runs out of the fill port, which is more than inch above the pan flange.

    He then disconnects a cooler line, starts the truck and pumps out fluid until it's a "nice cherry red". That says to me the fluid in the torque converter and valve body, roughly 2/3 the transmission volume, has been completely replaced with the two gallons he added. He then adds fluid (about a gallon?) and sets the level using a temperature gun on the pan, which will be cooler than the temperature at the transmission thermocouple.

    During this time, what happens to the pan level? What the hell does the achievement of a "nice cherry red" have to do with maintaining a fluid level in the pan? None, completely coincidental there's any fluid left in the pan. Elementary mathematics indicates he's run the level in the pan right down to breaking pump suction after having overfilled it by a gallon.

    I don't have a problem with the basic technique for complete fluid change, but it is lazy to expect to accomplish this in one step. Anyone that doesn't care about overfilling their transmission by a gallon, and then pumping the pan level right down to nothing, then this video should work for them.

    Another ATF video of his I watched was sales bs as well.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
  10. May 3, 2021 at 8:15 AM
    #40
    Clemsonman14

    Clemsonman14 New Member

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  11. May 3, 2021 at 9:04 AM
    #41
    hagrid

    hagrid Ich habe sie gespritzt

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    Good Lord, I hope not. Need to save money for fuel.
    So far, I'm the only one with a completely valid method for trangsmission maintenance: I'm gonna buy a new trangsmission every 60K miles.
     
  12. May 3, 2021 at 10:12 AM
    #42
    mb66l79

    mb66l79 New Member

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    Ok yeah I was asking to be called out. I know enough to know that I don't know everything.

    So if I'm wrong, educate me. I always like learning. What is your basis or source of your claim, or your credentials for knowing this? If you're going to make that claim, back it up and support it, prove me wrong.
     
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  13. May 3, 2021 at 10:19 AM
    #43
    snivilous

    snivilous New Member

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    Source for your claims? Sounds like absolute bullshit, but I've been wrong before.
     
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  14. May 3, 2021 at 10:26 AM
    #44
    tttrdpro

    tttrdpro Former Naval Person

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    I’ve come up with a radical 2 step plan to address transmission concerns:
    Step 1. Follow the Toyota maintenance schedule.
    Step 2. Refuse to worry about it.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
  15. May 3, 2021 at 10:27 AM
    #45
    Joe333x

    Joe333x [OP] Member

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  16. May 3, 2021 at 10:35 AM
    #46
    mb66l79

    mb66l79 New Member

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    Could it be because the valvoline fluid used is not what is specified to be used? Don't you think the necessary modifiers are already in new fluid? Or clutch material if that's what would actually be needed?

    I say that in complete jest. Let's use this forum as it was intended, sharing of information and knowledge, not what this thread is quickly turning into. Don't be offended by us questioning and challenging what you said. Prove us wrong.
     
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  17. May 3, 2021 at 10:40 AM
    #47
    hagrid

    hagrid Ich habe sie gespritzt

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    Good Lord, I hope not. Need to save money for fuel.
    No no no no no...
     
  18. May 3, 2021 at 10:43 AM
    #48
    Sumo91

    Sumo91 Somewhat new member

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    As to the transmission filter/screen debate. This is what mine looked like after 175k miles on the original filter/screen. No need to change the filter, very very very minimal clutch material inside the filter, and if I had to guess, it was all from initial break in. 20191213_150527-1.jpg 20191213_150654-1.jpg 20191213_150658-1.jpg 20191213_150702-1.jpg 20191213_150706-1.jpg 20191213_150715-1.jpg
     
  19. May 3, 2021 at 10:53 AM
    #49
    Joe333x

    Joe333x [OP] Member

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    This is awesome thanks. From all the information I've gathered I'm never going to drop the pan.
     
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  20. May 3, 2021 at 11:02 AM
    #50
    Sumo91

    Sumo91 Somewhat new member

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    Here is the thread I started when I first changed the trans fluid in my transmission

    https://www.tundras.com/threads/2014-transmission-maintenance-question.57617/

    Lots of good info and pictures from multiple members. I've had the Schaeffers 204SAT fluid in for 41k miles now with no issues (it has a slightly higher viscosity than what's called for, but works fine) I'll doing a complete drain and refill of 12+ quarts again this week with Schaeffers 205A (correct spec for our trans), and sending a sample to blackstone to see how the fluid looks after towing my 8k camper for several thousand miles and doing some heavy offloading.

    I agree never having to drop the pan to change the filter, unless it was super high mileage 500k+ just out of curiosity.
     
  21. May 3, 2021 at 11:19 AM
    #51
    Rocko9999

    Rocko9999 New Member

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    Why are people debating this is not a filter?
     
  22. May 3, 2021 at 11:29 AM
    #52
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    We’ve seen 1st Gens Trangsmission Filters/Screems with 300-400k miles and they look like can go another 300-400k. Clean!

    Per Fluid: Best practice is just Drain and Fill at regular intervals like every 2nd or 3rd Engine Oil Change.

    You guys definitely need an External Trans Cooler, though. :boink:
     
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  23. May 3, 2021 at 11:31 AM
    #53
    Joe333x

    Joe333x [OP] Member

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    I think the misconception was the material used for the filter. Many times it is described as a screen which it clearly is not but its also not a paper filter that could break down over time either. I guess i would call it a mesh screen maybe. They stopped using metal screens because they corrode overtime.
     
  24. May 3, 2021 at 11:43 AM
    #54
    JohnLakeman

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    I like and trust that guy. He's a smart, experienced Toyota technician. He posted an earlier video that explained why you should NEVER get your transmission "flushed", but I couldn't find it on YouTube. It's possible he got some "flak" from businesses that want to continue selling "transmission flushes".

    That "flush" video posted earlier by @GAknight is not a "flush" of the transmission in the usual sense, even if the video title identifies it as a "flush". A typical transmission "flush" procedure uses a machine with it's own pump, that pumps ATF (possibly contaminated or the incorrect type) from an onboard reservoir, through the transmission under higher pressure than normal operating. That's how those "deposits" inside the transmission get disturbed, and pushed into places they shouldn't be.

    What is occurring in that video is simply a complete replacement of the transmission fluid by starting the vehicle and allowing the transmission pump to empty all the old fluid out of the transmission through a disconnected cooler tube, while maintaining the pan fluid level by adding fresh fluid. The transmission does not even know it's fluid is being changed. I endorse the method, but not the poor execution in the video.

    Since you don't have a cooler, it's pretty much a moot point for you. Couldn't do this procedure if you wanted to.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
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  25. May 3, 2021 at 12:12 PM
    #55
    JohnLakeman

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    Basically, it's because the first person that ever referred to a transmission strainer as a "filter" was, well...under-informed and confused.

    Filters work by the flow being pushed by pressure through a fine media which incurs a pressure drop. The more pressure drop, the better the filtration, until of course the filter is plugged. Because of the pressure drop, you can not have a filter on the pick-up tube to a pump. It's true on engine oil pump pick-up tubes, and it's true on transmission pump pick-up tubes.

    The Tundra transmission strainer, in fact, has the pick-up tube built right into to it...it's sucking fluid nearly right off the pan bottom. If there's a 10 psi pressure drop across that strainer media...no more pump suction.

    This from the referenced filter/strainer supplier website linked below:

    Filters vs. Strainers (2).jpg

    http://www.gulfcoastfilter.net/strainers/difference-between-filters-strainers/#:~:text=The primary difference between filters,the particulates they are removing.&text=In simpler terms the word,term “filter” is used.
     
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  26. May 3, 2021 at 12:42 PM
    #56
    mb66l79

    mb66l79 New Member

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    Good info, I guess the question then becomes the size of the transmission filter/strainer, not that it really matters, we're arguing something unimportant. I was incorrectly using the differentiation based on media type. The term strainer I correlate to a "coarse" media that is cleaned instead of replaced. I was wrong.

    Though now that we're getting into the details, more pressure drop does not always equal better filtration. Filters can be and are in some cases also on suction sides of pumps, so that by itself also does not determine filter vs strainer.
     
  27. May 3, 2021 at 12:47 PM
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    RJVA

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    I would urge you to use the search function to find answers to your questions about LubeGuard. Have a fantastic day!
     
  28. May 3, 2021 at 12:51 PM
    #58
    15whtrd

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  29. May 3, 2021 at 1:08 PM
    #59
    JohnLakeman

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    Pressure drop across filters is NOT the desired outcome. The objective is to remove micron-sized contaminant particles from the fluid with as little pressure drop as possible. Filter media with very small internal passages does that, but at a pressure and energy price. The smaller the passages, the higher the pressure drop. If you're thinking of the K&N et al oiled-gauze filters, don't even get me started...A fool and his money are soon parted.

    Some pumps, e.g. positive displacement pumps, are more forgiving of suction pressure drop than others, such as centrifugal pumps. Automotive engine oil pumps and transmission pumps are both positive displacement pumps, and strainers are still used.

    No pump can handle a stopped-up suction, which is the likely result if an inaccessible "filter" works too well. If the pump can continue to pump, without shearing the drive or overpowering the driver, the extreme case is the pick-up tube would simply collapse on itself.

    Name an example of a pump with a filter on it's intake pipe (positive displacement vacuum pump?), and I'll admit it if you're right.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
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  30. May 3, 2021 at 1:15 PM
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    tttrdpro

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