1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Transfer over your build thread from a different forum to this one
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Worth paying dealership to fully replace transmission fluid?

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Tyler1524, Jun 29, 2020.

  1. Jun 30, 2020 at 12:06 PM
    #31
    tvpierce

    tvpierce New Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2019
    Member:
    #30129
    Messages:
    514
    Maine
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tundra AC
    ???
     
  2. Jun 30, 2020 at 1:04 PM
    #32
    KNABORES

    KNABORES New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2020
    Member:
    #40572
    Messages:
    111
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2000 Limited TRD Access cab
    Bilstein 5100's 16x8 589's with 265/75/16 and 1.25" spacers Flowmaster 50 series over the axle dump Westin bull bar with 20" LED Pioneer touchscreen with backup camera Full interior and dash LED conversion Trailer brake controller with 7 pin Bedliner coat bumpers trim and tool box
    The drain and fill technique usually yields 3-4qts of ATF. little more than a third of the total volume at best. But changing the ATF is not like an engine oil change. The fluid is not subject to the environment that engine oil is. Its not exposed to combustion and its byproducts. A sealed transmission is only exposed to heat and pressure. If there is internal damage occurring inside the transmission, then particles produced by that wear will get into the fluid. If you're using synthetic fluid, there's practically no breakdown of the fluid occurring over time. It doesn't produce the sludge that dino oils do. A drain and fill and a periodic filter change is all I've ever done. 255k trouble free miles. Towed a #7500 or so camper to the lake for years. Pulled a double axle Uhaul box trailer across the US. No issues. The flush from the cooler line looks legit, but not sure I'm going through the trouble at this point. Not a how to for the masses, merely my experience.
     
    revtune, Rex Kramer and YardBird like this.
  3. Jun 30, 2020 at 1:40 PM
    #33
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2018
    Member:
    #14878
    Messages:
    8,979
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Fred
    ‘Somewhere’... a State of Mind
    Vehicle:
    2002 Tundra SR5 4WD 4.7L AC Silver Metallica
    Hand Protectors
    I can say that when I do the Drain and Fill (4Qt version of draining at plug) that I can feel the shifts smooth out. Keep in mind I do a drain and fill about every 5-8k miles since a few years ago and the fluid started very fresh from a full service full 12Qt. swap a year prior.

    I can feel things smooth out even when it was already smooth. Another factor not addressed here is the proper levels are extremely important. A low level fluid shifts harder than when proper. The 2002 has a dip stick but its not accurate science. The fluid expands in Ambient and Operating temps which requires a Mojo Factor when calculating readings.
     
    Rex Kramer likes this.
  4. Jun 30, 2020 at 3:19 PM
    #34
    Rex Kramer

    Rex Kramer New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2017
    Member:
    #7181
    Messages:
    4,841
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Kevin
    Georgia
    Vehicle:
    2002 4.7L RCLB 4X4 2007 5.7L RCSB 2X4
    The transmission in my 2002 has always shifted well, and I recently had the dealer perform the drain & fill @ 170,000. I haven't driven it much since the service, but it does feel like it's shifting a little smoother. I believe that I will stick with this method going forward.
     
  5. Jun 30, 2020 at 3:30 PM
    #35
    DSLKSL

    DSLKSL New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2017
    Member:
    #5752
    Messages:
    11
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Don
    Vehicle:
    2016
    Leave it alone do not change it. If you changed it more often it would be ok but you have passed the point of no return.
     
  6. Jun 30, 2020 at 6:58 PM
    #36
    shifty`

    shifty` "that guy"

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Member:
    #48239
    Messages:
    56
    ATL
    Vehicle:
    '06 AC LTD 4WD/5AT + LSD & TOW PKG
    :popcorn: This is one of those questions you maybe don't ask in mixed company, ala religion or politics. :D

    Being a Toyota owner & lover for a scant 25% of my later years with earlier years enveloped primarily by GM, VW and Honda ownership, I'd tell you ... gearheads in that wide realm, especially GM folks, would warn about making radical changes to your transmission maintenance once you enter the 6-digit mileage range. Like, don't start babying your transmission if it spent its whole life in neglect, and if you don't know the history of care or neglect to your used vehicle, don't get radical with tranny service doing things like full fluid changes because you feel it'd help or make you feel better somehow.

    That viewpoint is often justified with "new fluids have more detergents, so if your tranny wasn't taken care of, and you suddenly replace that old fluid completely with new fluid, you add craploads of new detergent that could potentially break loose a chunk to clog something that doesn't need clogging or dissolve chunks holding something together". Scour the web and you'll find no shortage of horror stories about "yup, truck ran perfectly for 200k miles, got a full flush-replace, tranny died 3k miles later!"

    I don't personally have an opinion on it for reasons I'll get to in the next paragraph. Dad was a Navy airplane mechanic, taught me how to care for vehicles. I bring all my vehicles in to my favorite non-stealership shop every 30k for filter/flush/refill. At least 2x in between, I'm following drain/fill method PHM mentions above because it's a no-brainer you can do at home with limited tools like oil changes, bushings, the myriad of SeaFoam service and whatnot. Buy the right ATF, measure carefully what comes out, pour that off, add fresh fluid to the same level, then pump or pour it in. Some argue doing this once every 3-5k miles, you'll gradually add in detergents to safely melt things out, then after 4-5 changes you're in a good spot for a full flush.

    For what it's worth, I've never had to replace a tranny. I've owned no less than 3 dozen cars so far and have driven many well-into the 200k range. I can only tell you with my used cars, all bought under 110k miles, I've followed the above and *knock on wood* never had an issue.

    Of course, YMMV. Don't sue me if you have a different experience. I'm not a Toyo tech and only a 10-12 years happy Toyo experience.
     
    Rex Kramer likes this.
  7. Jun 30, 2020 at 11:26 PM
    #37
    270Fan

    270Fan New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2020
    Member:
    #48330
    Messages:
    5
    Interesting, I've had a dozen cars over the last 35 years and I've had two that the transmission went south on.... a 2002 Toyota Sienna minivan and a 2006 Toyota Tundra. I'm about to close the deal on a 2004 Tundra DC 4x4 for a hunting rig. Hoping the tranny holds together on this one.
     
  8. Jul 1, 2020 at 4:09 AM
    #38
    Rex Kramer

    Rex Kramer New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2017
    Member:
    #7181
    Messages:
    4,841
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Kevin
    Georgia
    Vehicle:
    2002 4.7L RCLB 4X4 2007 5.7L RCSB 2X4
    I owned more than 60 vehicles... the only transmissions that gave me problems was the automatic in a new '96 Crown Vic and the 5 speed in a new '97 Acura Integra GS-R. The Ford had computer issues, and the Acura 5-speed grenaded at speed.
     
    bmf4069 likes this.
  9. Jul 1, 2020 at 4:27 AM
    #39
    TTund16

    TTund16 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Member:
    #5798
    Messages:
    630
    Gender:
    Male
    Transmission fluid.
     
    KNABORES likes this.

Products Discussed in

To Top