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What engine oil/filter combo are you guys using?

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Alltimehigh, Mar 13, 2020.

  1. Mar 17, 2020 at 8:55 PM
    #61
    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    Anyone tried the Kirkland oil yet? Looks to be decent stuff I just don’t want to use a full synthetic.
     
  2. Mar 17, 2020 at 9:01 PM
    #62
    Hooptytrix

    Hooptytrix Squeaky Chicken

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    I wouldn't go with Costco store brand. A large majority of synthetic oil is actually petroleum based oil, the same as conventional oil with a different refining process. Either way, you should stick to a reputable brand
     
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  3. Mar 17, 2020 at 9:13 PM
    #63
    bmf4069

    bmf4069 Yup, that's car parts in a dishwasher

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    I'm with hoopty on this. The bigger the spread, the more additives or polymers in it.
     
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  4. Mar 17, 2020 at 9:42 PM
    #64
    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    Oh I’m not planning on using it, but $25 for 10 quarts is crazy cheap. I have been sticking to Quaker state and Valvoline high mileage.
     
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  5. Mar 18, 2020 at 6:05 AM
    #65
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    Technically, you are correct. Viscosity modifiers are polymers "added" to a base oil to make multi-viscosity oil.

    I was depending on a definition from Exxon Chemicals training 50+ years ago. Further discussion of organic chemistry between unarmed participants is likely futile. My point is that viscosity modifiers are chains of macromolecules, consisting of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, other elements, that have physical characteristics closer to the base oil molecules than to other polymers like polyethylene. They are not inorganic additives that might coalesce and separate readily from the base oil.
     
  6. Mar 18, 2020 at 6:10 AM
    #66
    Rex Kramer

    Rex Kramer New Member

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    My local Toyota dealer uses OEM filters and whatever oil is specified in the owners manual.
     
  7. Mar 18, 2020 at 6:39 AM
    #67
    speedtre

    speedtre New Member

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    Store brands are usually made by the same manufacturers as the one they sell. Since Costco only sells Mobil 1 (or at least that's all they sell at my Costco), I'd assume it's a variation of rebranded Mobil 1...so, it's probably a good choice, especially if you are doing sub 10K mile oil chnages.

    Pro-Tip. I'm an Irish Whiskey drinker. Costco sells a 1.75 liter of Jameson's for I think in the neighborhood of $45. The only other Irish Whiskey they sell is their Kirkland brand for $28 for 1.75 liter and damned if I can tell the difference, so I think it's made by Jamesons, but I don't know that. This applies doubly to their Vodka...actually more so, cause the Irish Whiskey I drink "neat" but vodka is always mixed in something....:thumbsup:

    https://www.liquor.com/articles/costco-irish-whiskey/
     
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  8. Mar 18, 2020 at 7:17 AM
    #68
    Hooptytrix

    Hooptytrix Squeaky Chicken

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    I thought this would help understand the difference between group 3 and group 4 synthetic oil.

    Group IIIs are a somewhat controversial class as they are derived from crude oil like Groups I & II, but their molecules have been so changed by severe processing that they are marketed as Synthetics. Most people now accept Group IIIs as synthetic, but the discussion remains heated among purists, and I’m going to duck by not taking a side here.

    Synthetic base oils are manufactured by man from relatively pure and simple chemical building blocks, which are then reacted together or synthesized into new, larger molecules. The resulting synthetic basestock consists only of the preselected molecules and has no undesirable weak links that inhibit performance. This ability to preselect or design specific ideal molecules tailored for a given job, and then create those molecules and only those molecules, opens a whole new world for making superior basestocks for lubricants. In fact, the entire formulation approach is different: instead of trying to clean up a naturally occurring chemical soup to acceptable levels with a constant eye on cost, the synthetic chemist is able to focus on optimum performance in a specific application with the knowledge that he can build the necessary molecules to achieve it. And since full synthetic oils are generally a company’s premier offering, their best foot forward so to speak, the additives are often better and in higher doses as performance trumps cost.

    In general, synthetic base oils offer higher oxidative and thermal stability, lower pour points, lower volatility, higher VI, higher flash points, higher lubricity, better fuel economy, and better engine cleanliness. The amount and balance of these improvements vary by synthetic type, and can be quite significant for the engine and user.
     
  9. Mar 18, 2020 at 7:40 AM
    #69
    Hooptytrix

    Hooptytrix Squeaky Chicken

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  10. Mar 18, 2020 at 7:59 AM
    #70
    speedtre

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  11. Mar 18, 2020 at 11:54 AM
    #71
    Hooptytrix

    Hooptytrix Squeaky Chicken

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    Sounds like you are by far more educated on the nuances of motor oil than I am. All I have to go on some basic explanation from an auto engineer (oil for dummies). But some quick Google search and I still see things the same. I pulled this from finol

    https://www.finol.ie/news/engine-oil-breakdown/

    For example, viscosity index improvers are used to decrease the thinning effects produced by operating at elevated temperatures. They are the key components that allow for the production of multi-grade oils. However, the long molecules in viscosity index improvers are susceptible to shearing in service, which reduces their capacity to minimize fluid viscosity loss. Permanent reduction of viscosity index improvers can result in the piston ring sticking due to the formation of various deposits, an increase in the level of oil being consumed and faster equipment wear.


    .







    [​IMG]
     
  12. Mar 18, 2020 at 2:32 PM
    #72
    myt1

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    I don't think anyone mentioned Wicks oil filters.

    Are they any good?

    I buy mine at O'Reilly's.
     
  13. Mar 18, 2020 at 8:09 PM
    #73
    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    I know they rebrand a lot of products. Some of their jackets around Christmas are north faces without the logo and sell for 70% cheaper.
     
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  14. Mar 19, 2020 at 9:57 AM
    #74
    Darkness

    Darkness Allergic to white

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    That and 235k miles. I buy filters in bulk and oil at Wally World.

    I run Liquimoly in my GTI but it's a bit expensive to throw in the Tundra. I do like getting those 5 quart jugs at Napa with the built in spout.
     
  15. Mar 19, 2020 at 10:01 AM
    #75
    Porkchop Express

    Porkchop Express New Member

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    Ive been using the K&N oil filters with Mobil1 0-20 every 5K miles. Seems to be working fine.
     
  16. Mar 19, 2020 at 11:11 AM
    #76
    Deuxlatch

    Deuxlatch AirBus

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    I only use Wix and yes, I get mine at Oreilly as well
     
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  17. Mar 19, 2020 at 11:37 AM
    #77
    BuckWallace

    BuckWallace Ball don't lie.

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    OEM filter, Kirkland brand 0W-20 synthetic.
     
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  18. Mar 21, 2020 at 8:56 AM
    #78
    Pucks18

    Pucks18 New Member

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    @JQ3 Dont see why people do that. I just spend the money on a "good " oil brand and have the peace of mind of having the best oil possible in there. U literally change the oil twice a year.
     
  19. Mar 21, 2020 at 8:57 AM
    #79
    Pucks18

    Pucks18 New Member

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    Pennzoil platinum 5w30, oem toyota filter.
     
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  20. Mar 22, 2020 at 1:14 PM
    #80
    speedtre

    speedtre New Member

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