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Urgent 2002 Front suspension problem, Help please!

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Ben SCholten, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. Jan 11, 2014 at 10:32 PM
    #1
    Ben SCholten

    Ben SCholten [OP] New Member

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    2 inch front leveling.
    Hey all, I have an urgent need that keeps me from working. I need to work, thus I need your expertise!

    In replacing the front shock absorbers to my 2002 v8 Tundra, I ordered adjustable front shocks, from 0 to 2.5 inch lift in 5 increment choices. These are assuredly the right shocks. (Bilstein Toyota Tundra FRT, BE5-6929-H1, Part 24-188265)

    I pulled out the old shocks from the coil and measured 18 and 7/8 inches (18.825") from centre of bolt hole (bottom) to top of suspension support. (Metal disk.) They were aftermarket parts, and destroyed, as they have no gas left, are cracked, and they had to be cut off.

    However, with the new shockes - regardless of lift settings - the space is 19 and 3/4 inches (19.75") and they are too long by that once inch. I can only toggle the top retainer nut setting about 1/8th, it doesn't help.

    I tried prying the lower control arm down to try and get the bolt in, but to no avail. I am even tempted to take out the one inch thick rubber damper over the suspension support plate to get it in, and rattle my teeth for awhile.

    Please tell me what I am doing wrong, as my truck and I are stranded.
     
  2. Jan 11, 2014 at 10:38 PM
    #2
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    Post some pics and maybe we can get enough of an idea to help. Odd they are too long. Don't remove the rubber at the top or the shock won't be able to move properly with every bounce of the wheel. This would destroy the shock quick.
     
    Bob likes this.
  3. Jan 11, 2014 at 10:45 PM
    #3
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    I'm sure there is a way to push the lower control arm down an extra inch. Put the tire back on and use body weight.

    If that doesn't work you can rent a spring clamp or buy a cheep set from harbor freight to tighten the spring reducing the length and allowing you to install.
     
  4. Jan 11, 2014 at 10:49 PM
    #4
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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  5. Jan 11, 2014 at 10:50 PM
    #5
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

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    Good suggestions...I second the clamp...
     
  6. Jan 12, 2014 at 9:01 AM
    #6
    jberry813

    jberry813 The Mad Scientist

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    Metric shit ton of parts
    First off, the shock is a fixed length and yes they are slightly longer than the factory shock. That's not going to change based on how much preload you add. By adjusting the collar on the Bilsteins you are just adding preload to the spring (which thereby will lift the truck).

    As for installation, remove the 4 bolts that connect the LBJ to the spindle. In doing so you won't be fighting with the tension of LCA/spindle/UCA. If you still can't get the coilover in, just use a little redneck ingenuity with the factory bottle jack. I've done this several times on trucks that have factory UCA's and it works every time:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Jan 12, 2014 at 10:39 AM
    #7
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 25 years ASE Master Certified Technician

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    50 miles past BFE, 13th trailer park on the right.
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    3 inch mixed component lift. Front locker, rear e-locker, 33 inch tires, custom dual batteries, 140A alternator, custom paint, many other mods to come!
    Good idea in the above post. I would say removing the lower ball joint would be the easiest method. If that does not work, or the jack does not work, consider unbolting the sway bar. The control arm is quite capable of moving plenty of distance. It's limits are based on the knuckle and upper suspension, as well as the sway bar. Pictures would be nice to have if you can post em!
     
  8. Jan 12, 2014 at 4:10 PM
    #8
    Ben SCholten

    Ben SCholten [OP] New Member

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    2 inch front leveling.
    That is one great move with the jack! I was considering it, but didn't under assumption it would slip off.

    It turned out that the previous owner had gotten one inch thicker rubber blocks to extend the shock as half of the lift height.

    Luckily the Haynes manual diagrams showed that the stock rubber is minuscule or non existent, placing the majority of work on the two cushions and lower suspension support rubber. The suspension support's bolts had been removed for longer ones to accommodate the blocks.

    With those upper blocks gone I was able to pry the control arm down the next 3/8 inch enough for the bolt to go in.
    Success!

    I had tried the spring compressors being on while trying to position it in, but it was too tight. Good idea though.


    I have to say, I'm pretty impressed with the amount of helpful feedback in only a few hours, way to go guys!
    You rock, and I'm on the road.
     
    BamaToy1997, csuviper and Bob like this.
  9. Jan 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM
    #9
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

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    Good to hear...
     
  10. Jan 14, 2014 at 7:24 AM
    #10
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 25 years ASE Master Certified Technician

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    50 miles past BFE, 13th trailer park on the right.
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    3 inch mixed component lift. Front locker, rear e-locker, 33 inch tires, custom dual batteries, 140A alternator, custom paint, many other mods to come!
    I am glad you found the issue, and were able to correct it!
     
  11. Jan 19, 2014 at 8:14 PM
    #11
    00Tundra

    00Tundra New Member

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    3" Toytec Coilovers, 1.5" Toytec AAL, 285/75/16 Nitto Trail Grapplers, Flowmaster 40 (exhaust silencer removed)
    When I installed my coilovers on my 2000 Tundy, I had to use a long pry bar amd a 4x4 block and pry down on the UCA. I would have thought the same about the jack slipping, or even damaging the fender well.
     
  12. Jan 20, 2014 at 8:49 AM
    #12
    BamaToy1997

    BamaToy1997 25 years ASE Master Certified Technician

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    50 miles past BFE, 13th trailer park on the right.
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    3 inch mixed component lift. Front locker, rear e-locker, 33 inch tires, custom dual batteries, 140A alternator, custom paint, many other mods to come!
    To be honest a pry bar is just as likely to slip on you. The jack does have the advantage of allowing you to have BOTH hands free though while working.

    The one thing I do try to say is that no matter WHAT unique working methods you use, always play it safe and if you ARE working on something dangerous, don't do it alone. Have someone nearby just in case. I know it can't always be done, so another thing I have used is to call a family or friend nearby and tell them you are working on something and that if you do not check in every 30 minutes or so, to call you, or come over if you can't be reached. It SOUNDS kinda stupid, but your life can be saved sometimes with something simple.
     
  13. Jan 20, 2014 at 12:41 PM
    #13
    huntark03

    huntark03 New Member

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    Front Bilstein 5100's w/ OME 885 coils Rear Bilstien 5100's w/ ToyTec 1.5" AAL Light Racing UCA's Drop in AFE Pro Dry Air Filter

    I used the same method, but used a piece of 2X4 in between the steering knuckle and lower ball joint to lessen the amount I had to extend the jack and how far the upper control arm had to be pushed down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  14. Jan 20, 2014 at 3:10 PM
    #14
    00Tundra

    00Tundra New Member

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    That's why I do the prying, and I have someone else slip the bolt through. I usually always have someone else with me if I have the truck off the ground.
     
  15. Apr 3, 2015 at 12:59 AM
    #15
    Rkcruza

    Rkcruza New Member

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    De Badged / Decaled, Firestone Ride Rite Air Bags w/ Daystar Cups, 17" Rims, Big Brake kit w/ slotted & drilled rotors, plus lots of work related stuff.
    For those who have an Auto Zone in their area you can do their "borrow" (they sell you the tool and refund when you return it...I think for liability reasons). Spring compressors, tailpipe expanders etc. Their Spring compressors are scary, but work OK....did both my Tundra and my nephews 4-runner with them. I hate spring compressors! Good source for tools to use, they have a big list in the store of what is up for "Loan".
     
  16. Apr 9, 2015 at 10:03 PM
    #16
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    I do have to follow up on this. Mine ended up failing when doing my brothers Camry strut springs. Luckily no one got hurt. Problem was how they were built. Went back to get another set as we wanted to just get it done. They changed the design for the better that can't fail in the way they did for me.
    Had to do with a nut attached via weld riviot with a hole through all thread. Now it's a bolt head that won't shear off.
     
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