1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Transfer over your build thread from a different forum to this one
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Tundra + trailer comb

Discussion in 'Towing & Hauling' started by Ryhud85, Jan 14, 2022 at 12:57 PM.

  1. Jan 14, 2022 at 12:57 PM
    #1
    Ryhud85

    Ryhud85 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Friday
    Member:
    #73125
    Messages:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    ryan
    Vehicle:
    2015 tundra
    rear air bags, MOVE front bumer
    I currently have a 2015 Double Cab 5.7 V8 Tundra, been a great truck. I put the firestone/ride rite air bags on it this fall to help with the squatting in the rear when I tow. I am currently looking at purchasing a bumper pull camper in the 30" range, weighing around 7-8K. The airbags said load capacity is at 5000 pounds. Not sure if I bought the wrong airbags to pull this size of camper or if I am looking at it wrong. I guess I am looking for some clarification here and if I need to look at different suspension options. Thanks!
     
  2. Jan 14, 2022 at 1:52 PM
    #2
    Cpl_Punishment

    Cpl_Punishment Brand Used Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Member:
    #25048
    Messages:
    8,454
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rosy
    Alberta, Canada
    Vehicle:
    2020 MGM SR5 CM 4X4
    30' is the length of the living area in the trailer or the total length from hitch to bumper? 30' box and 8000 lbs dry weight is pretty big for a halfton. I'd look at a shorter, lighter trailer.
     
  3. Jan 15, 2022 at 4:10 AM
    #3
    Retired...finally

    Retired...finally New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2021
    Member:
    #66426
    Messages:
    494
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    Vehicle:
    2021 Barcelona Red SR5 Crewmax
    none
    My experiences echo the above advice. I tend to err on the safe side believing my 23' box, 26' tongue to tail length TT weighing 6k# loaded is about as much as I want to tow. Mainly because even with very close to 10% tongue weight I'm pushing my 7,200# GVWR of the Tundra. My Wife, our HUGE Lab and myself as well a bed full of stuff. Mostly light stuff is what's in the truck bed.
    I plan for the worst weather. My travels are meant to be stress free not white knuckled adventures.
    Get your truck all loaded up with full fuel, camping gear, maps, binoculars fishing gear etc and hit the CAT Scales to see what's leftover for a WDH and trailer tongue weight before you buy that TT.
     
  4. Jan 15, 2022 at 4:31 AM
    #4
    Melikeymy beer

    Melikeymy beer No cooler for you!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2019
    Member:
    #33297
    Messages:
    1,132
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2019 Tundra
    My understanding is the 5k pounds relates to the load leveling capacity, not the GVWR of your trailer. If that's the case those airbags should be more than capable for your application. Hopefully, someone with a better understanding of airbags than me can confirm or refute.

    From RideRite

    Leveling capacity” refers to how much weight the air springs can lift when inflated to max PSI. So take our LoadLifter 5000 air springs, for example. This application is rated to up to 5,000 lbs.
     
    Squeaky likes this.
  5. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:26 AM
    #5
    AircareTundra

    AircareTundra New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2020
    Member:
    #45970
    Messages:
    142
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    JT

    This is very good advice. You will be surprised when you hit the scales. I have a 22 ft travel trailer......2 axle Bigfoot fiberglass job that weighs in about 6300 pounds or so as it was loaded for this trip to the scales. Wife and I headed to the races at the Poconos but we had firewood, two big coolers full of stuff, and various stuff needed for camping. On the way up to PA we hit the scales and I was shocked to see we were approx 800 pounds over the GVWR for the Tundra.

    I do use a weight distribution hitch that is pretty stout (Equalizer). We were below the RAWR when we weighed and despite that 800 pounds over the GVWR the Tundra felt much more stable than my previous Silverado 1500.

    On the way home we weighed it again after using up the wood, and moving the stuff in the trailer instead of in the bed of the truck.

    Legal but closer than I thought I'd be to the GVWR.

    Kind of a pain in the rear worrying about having to move or pack a certain way to not bust that GVWR when towing the trailer.

    I don't tow enough weight to justify moving to a 2500 or 250 of a less than reliable domestic make. And certainly NOT a diesel although most folks say if you can afford it.....that if you're buying a 3/4 or 1 ton go ahead and get the diesel instead of a gasser......even if you don't "need" the diesel.

    Search around on here and you will find plenty of folks giving great towing advice.

    Bottom line is I don't drive like a jack ass when towing. I keep it at 65 or less. Run in S4. Use tow haul button. Etc....etc.....and enjoy the ride in my reliable, sturdy Tundra with my upgraded sound system.

    As dumb as it sounds.........if I did look to upgrade to a 2500 I would keep the Tundra as my daily and trade in or outright sell the SS as it is paid off and fetching crazy money now when you run checks on Vroom, Carmax etc...etc...

    Good luck and I'd follow others advice about minding your weight ratings for whatever vehicles you opt to use as your tow vehicle.
     
    Retired...finally likes this.
  6. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:32 AM
    #6
    Squeaky

    Squeaky New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2019
    Member:
    #38041
    Messages:
    238
    Gender:
    Male
    Wisconsin
    Vehicle:
    ‘19 White TRD Pro
    ^ this. I would guess most of us who’ve put the firestones on wouldn’t have if all we could tow was 5000 pounds. You will be fine as far as the airbags go.
     
    Melikeymy beer likes this.
  7. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:35 AM
    #7
    AzureNightmare

    AzureNightmare ASCM#1 Douchebag formerly known as 50 Buck

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Member:
    #35514
    Messages:
    12,140
    First Name:
    Adam
    Wyoming
    Vehicle:
    2019 Cavalry Blue SR5 Crewmax
    RCI Skids and Sliders SCS Ray10 Wheels in Gunmetal Grey Falcon Tow/Haul Shocks by Terraflex Jomax ABS Sensor Guards
    Airbags don't increase how much you can tow. I would advise doing some reading on payload ratings, and ignore advertised payload ratings. They are stupidly optimistic and you need your specific truck's payload. Should be on a sticker inside the driver door jamb.

    As it stands, I think you need to decide if keeping the Tundra is your priority or if getting a trailer that big is the priority. You either need more truck or less trailer.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2022 at 6:30 AM
    Cpl_Punishment and AircareTundra like this.
  8. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:39 AM
    #8
    toyofan87

    toyofan87 Beer thirty

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2020
    Member:
    #43653
    Messages:
    1,230
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Seth
    Gettysburg, Penna
    Vehicle:
    80- Longbed/87-4Runner/08-Sr5 Tundra
    Toytec 2.0 Aluma 3/1.5 lift with JBA's UCA Falkens AT3 295/70/18
    Official welcome for your first post.. Pics?
     
  9. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:45 AM
    #9
    Melikeymy beer

    Melikeymy beer No cooler for you!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2019
    Member:
    #33297
    Messages:
    1,132
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2019 Tundra
    I don't use airbags since my truck rides level pulling my ~6k lb loaded TT with WDH so I'm not real knowledgeable.

    If his airbags are rated for 3200-5000 lbs load, is that rating overkill that will result in a harsh ride when towing?
     
    AzureNightmare likes this.
  10. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:52 AM
    #10
    Retired...finally

    Retired...finally New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2021
    Member:
    #66426
    Messages:
    494
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    Vehicle:
    2021 Barcelona Red SR5 Crewmax
    none
    Moving some items from the truck to the trailer was what I did. My first CAT scale weigh showed me 40# over on the truck so I didn't have to move much to the back of the trailer.
     
    AircareTundra likes this.
  11. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:55 AM
    #11
    Retired...finally

    Retired...finally New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2021
    Member:
    #66426
    Messages:
    494
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    Vehicle:
    2021 Barcelona Red SR5 Crewmax
    none
    Same here. It's seeming the desire to add airbags or additional springs may be a subtle indication of overloading your rig. That or a Jackass at the WDH dealer not having a clue what they are doing. Seems this happens way too often.
     
    AircareTundra likes this.
  12. Jan 15, 2022 at 5:56 AM
    #12
    AzureNightmare

    AzureNightmare ASCM#1 Douchebag formerly known as 50 Buck

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Member:
    #35514
    Messages:
    12,140
    First Name:
    Adam
    Wyoming
    Vehicle:
    2019 Cavalry Blue SR5 Crewmax
    RCI Skids and Sliders SCS Ray10 Wheels in Gunmetal Grey Falcon Tow/Haul Shocks by Terraflex Jomax ABS Sensor Guards
    Airbags are adjustable. You don't have to have them at max.
     
  13. Jan 15, 2022 at 6:01 AM
    #13
    Melikeymy beer

    Melikeymy beer No cooler for you!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2019
    Member:
    #33297
    Messages:
    1,132
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2019 Tundra
    They are rated for a range of load though. For instance 3200 - 5000. I would think for the Tundra a rating of Max 2000 lbs would probably be better suited since no reasonable person would carry more load than that.

    I thought this link was instructional.

    https://www.airliftcompany.com/workshop/air-spring-load-ratings/
     
  14. Jan 15, 2022 at 6:16 AM
    #14
    Melikeymy beer

    Melikeymy beer No cooler for you!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2019
    Member:
    #33297
    Messages:
    1,132
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2019 Tundra
    When I plug my truck in on etrailer.com it recommends 1500 lbs rated springs. That makes sense to me since my payload is less than 1500.

    Screenshot_20220115-081255.jpg
     
  15. Jan 15, 2022 at 6:19 AM
    #15
    AzureNightmare

    AzureNightmare ASCM#1 Douchebag formerly known as 50 Buck

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Member:
    #35514
    Messages:
    12,140
    First Name:
    Adam
    Wyoming
    Vehicle:
    2019 Cavalry Blue SR5 Crewmax
    RCI Skids and Sliders SCS Ray10 Wheels in Gunmetal Grey Falcon Tow/Haul Shocks by Terraflex Jomax ABS Sensor Guards
    Right, but reasonable people would just use a WDH because it'll handle any appropriate load. Most of the time people going for airbags are just trying to eliminate sag, because as long as there's no sag you’re not overloaded in their minds. Look at most of the overloaded Tundras hauling huge trailers and you'll almost always find airbags, helper/add a leaf springs, or both.

    That said, even bags rated over the actual weight can be deflated. You can still adjust the ride, but they will get stiffer faster. (TWSS)
     
    Cpl_Punishment likes this.
  16. Jan 15, 2022 at 6:33 AM
    #16
    Squeaky

    Squeaky New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2019
    Member:
    #38041
    Messages:
    238
    Gender:
    Male
    Wisconsin
    Vehicle:
    ‘19 White TRD Pro
    I’m certainly not suggesting you should load your bed with 5000 pounds and let her rip. You still need to follow the door jam guidelines. I tow a boat that tips the scales around 4500lbs. I put around 20# of air in and away I go with a nice level ride. Bags will not hurt the ride one bit while loaded, if anything they improve it. If you drive around with your bags aired up while NOT towing (or hauling heavy), your teeth might rattle loose.
     
    AzureNightmare likes this.
  17. Jan 15, 2022 at 6:47 AM
    #17
    Melikeymy beer

    Melikeymy beer No cooler for you!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2019
    Member:
    #33297
    Messages:
    1,132
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2019 Tundra
    Yeah, I guess I'm just trying to directly answer the OP's question, which was whether his 5000 lb rated air bags were appropriate for his intended application. From what I have read it appears they are overkill and something in the 2000 lb range would be more appropriate.

    Having said that, if I were going to buy the trailer he described (which I wouldn't) I would probably just tow it and see how it pulled with the set up he has.
     
  18. Jan 15, 2022 at 7:36 AM
    #18
    Cpl_Punishment

    Cpl_Punishment Brand Used Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Member:
    #25048
    Messages:
    8,454
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rosy
    Alberta, Canada
    Vehicle:
    2020 MGM SR5 CM 4X4
    I would say this advice is outdated. Modern diesels don't like short trips, stop and go traffic and things like that. You need to work them and let them regen properly.
     
  19. Jan 15, 2022 at 7:44 AM
    #19
    AzureNightmare

    AzureNightmare ASCM#1 Douchebag formerly known as 50 Buck

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Member:
    #35514
    Messages:
    12,140
    First Name:
    Adam
    Wyoming
    Vehicle:
    2019 Cavalry Blue SR5 Crewmax
    RCI Skids and Sliders SCS Ray10 Wheels in Gunmetal Grey Falcon Tow/Haul Shocks by Terraflex Jomax ABS Sensor Guards
    Yup. Short trips are terrible for diesels.
     
    Cpl_Punishment likes this.
  20. Jan 15, 2022 at 7:52 AM
    #20
    AircareTundra

    AircareTundra New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2020
    Member:
    #45970
    Messages:
    142
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    JT

    I do hear that most of these new "designer diesels" with all of the eco garbage on them are full of issues regardless of which make you choose........between electrical issues, regen problems, mechanical issues, etc...etc......as compared to older diesels without all of this eco garbage on them.

    Having said that if y'all were looking to buy a 250 or 2500 which make would you choose and why? And which gasser and or why?
     
    Cpl_Punishment likes this.
  21. Jan 15, 2022 at 7:57 AM
    #21
    AzureNightmare

    AzureNightmare ASCM#1 Douchebag formerly known as 50 Buck

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2019
    Member:
    #35514
    Messages:
    12,140
    First Name:
    Adam
    Wyoming
    Vehicle:
    2019 Cavalry Blue SR5 Crewmax
    RCI Skids and Sliders SCS Ray10 Wheels in Gunmetal Grey Falcon Tow/Haul Shocks by Terraflex Jomax ABS Sensor Guards
    DEF and EGRs have ended the unkillable diesels. The old saw holds true; they don't make 'em like they used to.

    Another thing most don't consider is that diesel engines are really heavy. Getting a 2500/250 for more payload is fine, but putting a diesel in it hurts the payload gains. Some aren't a whole lot better than a half ton once a diesel is dropped in. If you are looking at a diesel you may as well go 3500/350 and get the most weight capability.
     
    AircareTundra and Cpl_Punishment like this.
  22. Jan 15, 2022 at 8:57 AM
    #22
    Cpl_Punishment

    Cpl_Punishment Brand Used Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Member:
    #25048
    Messages:
    8,454
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rosy
    Alberta, Canada
    Vehicle:
    2020 MGM SR5 CM 4X4
    If I was buying a heavy duty truck, I'd probably go for a 3500. It's only a couple thousand dollars more than a 2500 and much more capable.

    My first choice would be a Sierra/Silverado with the 6.6 gasser. My understanding is it's just a bored out version of the iron block 6.0L, which is stone ax simple and has been rock solid reliable. I believe the 6 speed transmission also carries over from the previous generation. GM may have some issues but they don't tend to mess around with the drivetrains in their HDs.

    My second choice would be an F350 with the 6.2 and the 6 speed because that combo has been around a while so is most likely to have the fewest issues.

    Third choice would be an F350 with the 7.3 and 10 speed. This one is very intriguing but I'd want to give them a couple more years of testing before I got one. OHV engines tend to get better fuel economy when working than OHC engines and this one has tons more power than I'd ever need.

    I'd probably go look at a 6.4 Ram 3500 just for completeness but I can't see myself in a Ram even though the interiors are posh and the reliability is supposedly improving.
     

Products Discussed in

To Top