1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Trailer Axle Maintenance

Discussion in 'Towing & Hauling' started by ColoradoTJ, May 9, 2018.

  1. May 9, 2018 at 10:24 AM
    #1
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ [OP] #WAISTBAND

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2016
    Member:
    #2766
    Messages:
    11,266
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    2016 GMC Summit White
    Husky products, 28% tint on windows.
    @landphil, he is a professional in this particular area, feel free to add your comments.

    I really hate being on the side of the road due to stupidity on my part, so when things just are not normal, time to inspect your equipment.

    I rarely use my service brakes do to the truck used to pull, but that won't help me in an emergency stopping condition. Over the past couple of years I have had to crank up my brake controller a little more than I would like. Two things, either my brakes are out of adjustment/shot or I have a seal puking grease inside my brake assembly. Since my brake shoes were in great shape last year, I kinda knew what might be happening.

    Tools needed for axle bearing & brake maintenance:
    9BA10DDF-76AF-455E-954F-3594FC755E83.jpg
    BD0FDFF5-293F-45F0-8BA0-90F557A27772.jpg

    -Dead blow hammer
    -seal install, removal tool kit
    -Screwdriver, needle nose pliers, Adjustable wrench
    -Drum brake spring tools and adjuster.
    -wire brush
    -Grease gun/bearing grease.

    Parts:
    Bearing kit, seal, emory cloth, cotter keys six one packs of beer.

    image.jpg

    -Remove bearing hub dust cap (use hammer and screwdriver)


    -Remove cotter key and dispose of it. Use a new one.
    4498050B-D467-411F-8FE2-F70A7B043A0C.jpg

    -Remove spindle castle nut and washer. Easiest way to do this is start pulling on the brake drum a bit and then push the assembly back in. The bearing and washer should be easy to grab now.

    -Remove the brake drum. You may need to loosen up on the brakes a bit. This is what the brake adjustment tool is for. Remove the dust cap from the rear of the dust plate, use the adjusting tool to release the brakes.

    030EA387-3769-4C6E-BC3B-48E17149DF08.jpg

    Bad inner seal.

    -This is what a typical trailer brake assembly looks like, but as you can see, I have grease inside my brake assembly, so the rear seal is out on this one. No wonder the brakes were not grabbing since they were covered in grease.

    D39A56B8-C947-4D5A-AB5C-19A6B679787B.jpg

    -Clean up the spindle and check for any rough spots or gouges. This one actually has a little spot that needs to be touched up with some emory cloth. This can cause the seal to be torn, bearing not to seat all the way...etc etc etc.

    C935F126-A4EC-40FE-93E8-F539C1E148EB.jpg

    -Use the bearing seal install kit to remove inner bearing/seal. Inspect inner bearing, race and repack bearing. Remember to install the bearing before the seal. Install seal.

    6F82EB25-806A-418B-A261-36480C357D2C.jpg A0BB220B-22FB-4966-BB58-DF7FEC38EE3A.jpg E150428A-0959-4E6F-8AC9-1B96DD026403.jpg F0326541-65E4-4921-9DC2-907AB8497115.jpg

    -Clean up braking surface and where the electric magnet runs on inside the drum.

    -Lube up the spindle shaft. You always want to lube your shaft.

    AB2A8F90-BC2D-48ED-8C5D-F6E2C06399FF.jpg

    -Reinstall brake drum, carefully sliding it on the lubed shaft to protect the seal. Reinstall outer bearing after inspection, repacking, etc. Install the washer first, then the castle nut. Tighten down the nut pretty good, then back off 1/4 turn. There are torque specs for seating bearing sets, but I have been doing this for a bit and would like to think I know a little bit. Install cotter key and bend the tabs opposite of each other.

    -Install dust cap with your dead blow or rubber mallet. Careful not to dent or damage that cover.

    -Install wheel and tire and tighten lug nuts as best you can with the wheel remaining off the ground. Climb under the trailer and adjust the brakes. I like to tighten them down to where you can't move the tire, and then back off.

    Other items to remember:
    -If there's grease all over the shoes, they need to be replaced. Trailer brakes come in assemblies (usually) and you just disconnect the electrical wires, remove the 4 bolts on the backing plate and install the new assembly. Its very easy and the way to go. This way you get all new hardware. For a 10" brake, this is about 38.00. A new drum is around 40+. Trailer.com has complete assemblies for 70-80.00, which is a great deal.
    -Check the drum for excessive wear. On the drum, it will say what the maximum allowable diameter for the service life.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2018
    landphil, RangerBP, gosolo and 9 others like this.
  2. May 10, 2018 at 6:03 PM
    #2
    pamtnman

    pamtnman New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2017
    Member:
    #8958
    Messages:
    110
    Gender:
    Male
    God's Country
    Vehicle:
    '17 Tundra TRD CrewMax
    Working through the list
    Thanks for posting. I admire your ability to do this work; it is beyond my capability. I'll take mine to one of the trailer guys around, but it is useful to see what goes on with this work
     
    757TUNDRA and ColoradoTJ [OP] like this.
  3. May 10, 2018 at 6:08 PM
    #3
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ [OP] #WAISTBAND

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2016
    Member:
    #2766
    Messages:
    11,266
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    2016 GMC Summit White
    Husky products, 28% tint on windows.
    You have to be comfortable doing the work. No harm, no foul.
     
    pamtnman likes this.
  4. May 10, 2018 at 6:13 PM
    #4
    pamtnman

    pamtnman New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2017
    Member:
    #8958
    Messages:
    110
    Gender:
    Male
    God's Country
    Vehicle:
    '17 Tundra TRD CrewMax
    Working through the list
    Yeah brother
     
    ColoradoTJ [OP] likes this.
  5. May 10, 2018 at 6:20 PM
    #5
    BTBAKER

    BTBAKER HAS ANYONE SEEN MY BASEBALL?

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2017
    Member:
    #11185
    Messages:
    916
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brad
    Castle Rock
    Vehicle:
    2017 Tundra TRD limited
    Great write up. Thanks.
     
    ColoradoTJ [OP] likes this.
  6. May 10, 2018 at 6:49 PM
    #6
    ertlonggun

    ertlonggun New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Member:
    #11379
    Messages:
    9
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Vehicle:
    2013 Dbl cab grey TRD
    TRD air filter TRD air flow accelerator Dirty Deeds budget SS Exhust 21/2 level kit Worx wheels Roadmaster active suspension (rear) P-3 brake controller
    I just repacked the bearings, replaced the seals, and adjusted the brakes on my travel trailer today. Getting ready for the camping season.
     
    pamtnman and ColoradoTJ [OP] like this.
  7. May 10, 2018 at 7:18 PM
    #7
    Alloutdrs1

    Alloutdrs1 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2017
    Member:
    #6150
    Messages:
    659
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Andrew
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Vehicle:
    17' Tundra SR5, 12' Tacoma TRD offroad
    Great post and perfect timing as many get ready to hit the road for camping this summer. I just did mine in April on my pop up camper, good peace of mind.
     
  8. May 10, 2018 at 7:23 PM
    #8
    Rngr188

    Rngr188 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2017
    Member:
    #6285
    Messages:
    423
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chad
    Harrison AR
    Vehicle:
    17 Silver Sky Limited CM 4x4 TRD
    Good post. I just replaced my Tie Down Engineering junk torsion axle on my boat trailer with a UFP torsion axle and Vault maintenance free hubs as well as new rotors, calipers, and pads plus an actuator in the tongue (surge system).
     
  9. May 12, 2018 at 7:27 PM
    #9
    Watt maker

    Watt maker Keepin' the lights on!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2017
    Member:
    #8415
    Messages:
    1,470
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ronald
    Vehicle:
    2017 TRD Pro Tundra DC Cement
    1 of 255
    You just reminded me that I need to do this to my trailers. I've been putting it off for too long now. I know better. :frusty:
     
  10. May 12, 2018 at 7:36 PM
    #10
    gosolo

    gosolo “The .com stands for communist”, Dale Gribble

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    Member:
    #2064
    Messages:
    2,684
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ray
    Central AZ
    Vehicle:
    2015 DC Super Fine Super White Pro
    2"CB shackles, bushings and 1 shim, lockerdown console vault, rear folding seat back mod, snugtop shell with opening side windows, 46g fuel tank, SDHQ sliders and hidden winch, Decked Drawers, Icon leaf spring packs and got rid of the interior chrome
    Nice post my friend. Hopefully this gives confidence and understanding to folks that need and want to do stuff themselves!
     
  11. May 12, 2018 at 11:20 PM
    #11
    landphil

    landphil Running on empty

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2016
    Member:
    #4814
    Messages:
    797
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Phil
    BC, Canada
    Vehicle:
    2008 Silver DoubleCab Tundra TRD 5.7L
    Those two, and trusting someone when they tell you they recently serviced the bearings. All three are killer.

    Great thread Chris,

    The only things I can think of to add:
    - check the lever the brake magnet attaches to for free movement on the pivot.

    - check your brake magnets before reinstalling the drum (manual application with brake controller, and make sure it grabs hold of a wrench or anthing iron.) It sure pisses a guy off when the brake doesn’t work because of a faulty magnet after it’s all together.

    - for anyone in areas where salt is used, remove the star wheel adjuster from the brake shoes, disassemble it, wire brush the threads if needed, and apply a light coat of anti-sieze to the threads and moving points.
     
    ColoradoTJ [OP] and Watt maker like this.
  12. May 15, 2018 at 9:02 PM
    #12
    Watt maker

    Watt maker Keepin' the lights on!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2017
    Member:
    #8415
    Messages:
    1,470
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ronald
    Vehicle:
    2017 TRD Pro Tundra DC Cement
    1 of 255
    @ColoradoTJ inspired me so today I pulled the hubs off my utility trailer, cleaned and repacked the bearings. I’ve been meaning to do this since I bought this trailer used more than 4 years ago but I’ve just been putting it off. The rear axle looked like it had been serviced before, the brakes looked good and the bearings were packed decent and the grease didn’t look very old. The front axle was a different story, the bearings didn’t have much grease and looked like some water had made its way in. Luckily, I didn’t have to replace any bearings, just the seals. There was also some slight discoloration on the front axle where you could tell it had been a little hot before.

    Going to put about 300 miles on it tomorrow and I definitely don’t want any issues.
     
  13. May 15, 2018 at 9:09 PM
    #13
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ [OP] #WAISTBAND

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2016
    Member:
    #2766
    Messages:
    11,266
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Chris
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    2016 GMC Summit White
    Husky products, 28% tint on windows.
    Excellent choice. It really sucks doing this maintenance on the side of the road, from what I’ve heard.
     
    pamtnman likes this.
  14. May 15, 2018 at 9:11 PM
    #14
    Watt maker

    Watt maker Keepin' the lights on!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2017
    Member:
    #8415
    Messages:
    1,470
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ronald
    Vehicle:
    2017 TRD Pro Tundra DC Cement
    1 of 255
    No it does, I’ve been there a couple times.
     
    ColoradoTJ [OP] likes this.

Products Discussed in

To Top