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tire load rating in comparison to ride quality

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by tat2ude39, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. Apr 1, 2015 at 9:51 PM
    #1
    tat2ude39

    tat2ude39 [OP] MYota

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    A topic here I could use a little advice on and the effects of high and low end load ratings and how it correlates to ride quality and handling...
     
  2. Apr 1, 2015 at 10:58 PM
    #2
    bobeast

    bobeast really old member

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    Higher load rating will have a higher recommended tire pressure and a lower ride quality. As in most things, you need to find the sweet spot for your intended use. Getting tires with a load rating beyond what your truck is rated for, sacrifices ride quality for no reason. Conversely, using under-rated tires would sacrifice, load handling/tow or off-road capability but would improve the ride quality.

    Is there a particular problem you are trying to solve?
     
  3. Apr 1, 2015 at 11:15 PM
    #3
    tat2ude39

    tat2ude39 [OP] MYota

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    My stock Mich LTX M/S2 are rarted at 2365lbs., 30-33psi. I noticed the Cooper S/T Maxx I want are rated at 4080lbs with a max of 80psi. It seems that most of the LT rated "off-road" tires are higher which I guess is expected. Maybe I'm just reading to much into this...? I don't do any hauling yet... maybe a Razor or 4 wheeler in the future, but I do take it off road frequently. Being my first truck, just not sure what to expect with a heavier setup. I do feel the stock setup doesn't hold well cornering, so a little stiffer is better?
     
  4. Apr 2, 2015 at 8:38 AM
    #4
    BPRescue

    BPRescue New Member

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    The tires Toyota puts on is a balance between comfort and performance, though they are quite "conservative" on performance outside of how well they handle on pavement. So, where they work great for the city, you really start to see limitations off road including their ability to stay alive in modes terrain such as rocks.

    I think the question here is will you tow quite a bit, and or plan to use this off road beyond the washboard dirt roads? If you do, there are much better tires out there for both, and when you go with a more aggressive off road tire, the load rating often increases, so you limit yourself by staying with the same load rating Toyota provides.

    I have owned BFG AT's on all of my vehicles and where it increase the load rating, it also provides a stronger tire with clearly better performance off road and towing. I keep air pressure closer to the minimum for regular driving for comfort or off road conditions, but will pump it up when towing. With the Toyota tires, there is no need to upgrade just for standard towing, and selecting a tire with an extreme load rating is overkill.
     
  5. Apr 3, 2015 at 12:46 AM
    #5
    Rkcruza

    Rkcruza New Member

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    Depending on what you do with the truck will influence what type of tire you use. On my first gen Tundra I swapped out the crappy stock tires for BFG AT's at about 9k miles. The ones I got were C rated LT's. Stiffer Ride but it is a work truck and weighs in close to 6k all the time. When I was getting close to 100k on the truck I checked and they wanted about $1200 for a set of 265/70/17 BFG AT's...decided to shop. Ended up buying 265/70/17 BFG Rugged Terrain's in a P rated tire like came stock on the truck. I was amazed at how much better the truck rode (comfort wise) and was surprised to find the new tires worked better in the snow than the AT's. I run the P tires at 35psi due to the constant load I carry and have had zero issues with them. If I'm towing the FJ40 I simply bump the rears up close to max and have not really noticed any difference when towing. When running the lower normal pressure they are a bit more squishy on the twisties, but it is a truck, not sports car. The only real advantage with the LT's is the "stronger sidewall" if you are doing a lot of rock crawling and such (I've eaten many an LT sidewall on the 40 and they are BFG MT's). With the P type tires you get smoother ride, way less unsprung weight so better suspension handling, better gas mileage etc. With the LT's you get stiffer tires way over rated for most 1/2 tons, but they come in much more aggressive styles and sizes. Below is a chart that gives the ratings for most P & LT tire sizes up to 20 inch wheels...take a read and decide what you need. I dug this up as I was looking to find what "safe" pressure I could run the BFG AT's that came on my Taco Pro as the factory stickered 46psi made it ride like a brick.
     

    Attached Files:

    tat2ude39 likes this.
  6. Apr 3, 2015 at 1:03 PM
    #6
    chphilo

    chphilo New Member

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    I have Nitto Trail Grappler in 295/70/18. It's a little stiffer but actually rides pretty good. Hums a little too, but not too bad (apparently it's one of the quietest MTs). If you go off road, I would think having extra protection could only help.
     
    Sean266 likes this.
  7. Apr 3, 2015 at 4:54 PM
    #7
    tat2ude39

    tat2ude39 [OP] MYota

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    Thanks for all your comments, those who chimmed in! :cheers:
     
  8. Apr 3, 2015 at 9:53 PM
    #8
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

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    How do these hold up in snow? I just got mine on the other day.
     
  9. Apr 3, 2015 at 11:03 PM
    #9
    chphilo

    chphilo New Member

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    Congratulations. You will love these tires in snow.
     
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  10. Apr 4, 2015 at 10:13 PM
    #10
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    Sean you got Terra not Trail

    This is a good thread btw.
     
  11. Apr 5, 2015 at 9:30 PM
    #11
    Rkcruza

    Rkcruza New Member

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    As a note. When I said I put on the 265/70/17 P rated Rugged Terrains like came on the truck I was referring to the P rating of the tire...the BFG Rugged Terrains are not to be confused with the BFG Rugged Trail Tires that were OE stock tires, they were crappy tires, I really like the Rugged Terrains.
     
  12. Apr 12, 2015 at 3:56 AM
    #12
    tat2ude39

    tat2ude39 [OP] MYota

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    Is your truck lifted? if so, what? I'm looking to get some wheels and tires, same size and offset as you. Was wondering with my slight pro lift if I'll encounter any rubbing due to offset. I am getting a new front bumper and body mounts cut.
     
  13. Apr 12, 2015 at 12:36 PM
    #13
    chphilo

    chphilo New Member

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    I have OME 614 kit (3 & 1/2 inch lift in the front. I know that there are some Pro owners who installed 295/70/18 without an issue.
     
  14. Apr 12, 2015 at 4:09 PM
    #14
    tat2ude39

    tat2ude39 [OP] MYota

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    Yep, but all have used stock wheels. I haven't seen anyone yet with stock PRO going with different offset wheels.
     
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