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Speed Bleeders Gen III

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014+)' started by Sunfish, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Feb 13, 2020 at 8:08 AM
    #1
    Sunfish

    Sunfish [OP] New Member

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    My 17 Limited is approaching 40K and not having a great deal of faith in my selling dealer I'm interested in a set of speed bleeders so I could change the brake fluid out without introducing air into the system. The application charts I looked at only go up to 2006. Anybody know the part numbers or a brand that I can order or pick up locally?
     
  2. Feb 14, 2020 at 8:26 AM
    #2
    CreekDweller

    CreekDweller New Member

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    If you cannot find the right size speed bleeders, an alternative is to purchase a hand operated vacuum brake bleeder, if you don't already have one. They are not expensive.

    If you aren't familiar with a vacuum brake bleeder - you attach the clear plastic tubing (from the vacuum kit) over the caliper bleed screw, then pump up the vacuum in the collection cup using the hand pump. Next, open the bleed screw slowly until the old fluid begins to flow into the cup. You will have to keep an eye on the level of brake fluid in the master cylinder and replenish it with fresh brake fluid as the old fluid is vacuumed out. It's even easier if you have speed bleeders, but the process is so simple that you might not even miss having them.
     
    15whtrd and Tundyfundy like this.
  3. Feb 14, 2020 at 8:43 AM
    #3
    BecauseRacecar

    BecauseRacecar New Member

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    I'd suggest using a Motive power bleeder. You pressurize the brake fluid reservoir, then just crack the bleeders and it'll push fluid out. Very low chance of getting air in the system, as you can close the bleeder and go inspect the reservoir's level at any time.
     
  4. Feb 14, 2020 at 1:53 PM
    #4
    triharder

    triharder New Member

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    Call or email speed bleeders they have the correct size. I have an 2010 and verified the size. Some people have had trouble with them or don't like them. They are not useful if you drain past the reservoir to bleed the systems from empty. But, i've had success with them on an operating system. Makes it a one person job.

    Somebody once mentioned the vacuum pump idea to me and i agreed, but if you think about it your sucking air into the brakes to bleed them. (ideally this doesn't happen but could). I like the pressure bleeding or the speed bleeders. I'd also recommend the stainless steel ones.

    Hope that helps.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2020 at 2:04 PM
    #5
    Joe333x

    Joe333x Member

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    I have a mighty vac and it worked great on my motorcycle. You're not sucking air into the lines, you are sucking out the old fluid and then sucking in the new fluid, you create a vacuum.

    Why do you want to change your brake fluid at 40k are you having braking issues?
     
  6. Feb 14, 2020 at 2:12 PM
    #6
    triharder

    triharder New Member

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    Your supposed to do this every 2 years or less.

    thanks for clarifying the vacuum process. And yes, lots of people use the handpump to pull the fluid outta the lines in hopes that is also pulls the air.
    Its a great tool.

    I use speedbleeders on my the motorcycles too (once the line has volume in it, such as upgrading the lines you'd want to push fluid with the non-speed bleeder first. I do have the handpump and have used it before. I just don't like pulling as opposed to pushing. (just personal preference I guess).

    May not be the best direction for some but it works well for me replacing the fluids yearly on the bikes and every 2 years on the truck.
     
  7. Feb 14, 2020 at 2:17 PM
    #7
    Joe333x

    Joe333x Member

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    Source?
     
  8. Feb 14, 2020 at 2:25 PM
    #8
    triharder

    triharder New Member

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    15whtrd likes this.
  9. Feb 14, 2020 at 3:06 PM
    #9
    CreekDweller

    CreekDweller New Member

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    Except for synthetic brake fluid, all brake fluid is hydroscopic, which means it absorbs water. In this case, moisture from the air that seeps past the brake caliper piston seals when you apply the brakes. If you are in a humid or wet area, you may have to bleed brakes as often as annually. If you are in a dry area, not so often. Generally, the brake fluid becomes cloudy when contaminated by moisture and you want to bleed the old fluid out as soon as you can to avoid corrosion in the brake system. There is no risk of introducing air into your brakes by vacuum bleeding unless when you are bleeding you allow the fluid level in the brake reservoir to fall to the level of the brake lines at the bottom. Just check the level as you are bleeding and pour fresh fluid in as the old stuff is vacuumed out.
     
  10. Feb 14, 2020 at 3:25 PM
    #10
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    Regular brake fluid changes is common knowledge even if Toyota doesn't offer any maintenance recommendations. You can argue about the necessity or frequency, but if you ignore brake fluid change, it will eventually to bite you hard if you keep your Toyota a long time.

    This is a succinct description of standard practice and the reasons why it's required:

    "As brake fluid ages, it absorbs moisture, which lowers its boiling point and raises its freezing point and causes increased corrosion of the brake system components. Automotive experts agree that brake fluid should be changed regularly as a part of normal routine service. Not all manufacturers mention brake fluid in their scheduled maintenance recommendations, those that do, recommend fresh brake fluid approximately every 2 years or 24,000 miles up to every 3 years or 36,000 miles."
    https://allaboutautomotive.com/blog/how-often-should-i-have-my-brake-fluid-serviced/

    My 2017 owner manual offers this cryptic warning, if not maintenance recommendations:

    "
    Brake fluid can absorb moisture from the air...Excess moisture in the brake fluid can cause a dangerous loss of braking efficiency. Use only newly opened brake fluid."

    Leaking calipers and loss of brake fluid will usually qualify as a "dangerous loss of braking efficiency".

    Rebuilt brake calipers and master cylinders for classic car restoration have to be "sleeved" with stainless steel tubing and honed to finish bore dimension because there are no new castings available. The original bores are pitted beyond usefulness. Pitted bores will lead to leaking piston seals, and/or torn/worn piston seals. With ABS control valves, regular fluid change is even more important to prevent rust scale and sludge damage to a very expensive component.
     
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  11. Feb 15, 2020 at 7:30 AM
    #11
    Sunfish

    Sunfish [OP] New Member

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    I have a Mightyvac but thought the speedbleeder would be better in the long run. What’s happening when I leave the garage is the left rear caliper? Is popping when it turns loose. Not sure if it’s sticking or has air or what. It does it every time when letting the brake off to pull away at fast idle
     
  12. Feb 15, 2020 at 7:56 AM
    #12
    Joe333x

    Joe333x Member

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    Does it only happen when you first drive away? Sounds like what you might be experiencing is the same thing every Tundra owner does. It concerned me until I search Tundra popping sound and realized it's not just me. Apparently it's the truck testing it's ABS. It does it every time I drive away.
     
  13. Feb 15, 2020 at 8:00 AM
    #13
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    I also have a MityVac but never use it for brake bleeding. I had too many experiences where I could never get the air out of the system. I discovered the vacuum was pulling air back into the caliper through the clearance in the loosened bleeder threads...I was spinning my wheels forever. I went back to standard two person bleeding to get a hard pedal.

    On a wheel where there is "popping when it turns loose", it's unlikely to be a sticking caliper imo. Maybe hearing the noise in person would change my mind. If you have sticking piston(s) in a caliper, you can try freeing it up with movement, but you will probably have to replace the caliper. Doubtful that it's air in the system in any event. If you have air in the system, you'll clearly have a "spongy pedal". I would inspect first for pads sticking to the rotor (wet conditions, infrequent use), e-brake adjustment, etc.
     
  14. Feb 15, 2020 at 8:22 AM
    #14
    Sunfish

    Sunfish [OP] New Member

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    I hear it when letting off the brake. If it’s a self check it’s consistent and it only does it when leaving the garage. I don’t notice it after that even when leaving for home in the evening
     
  15. Feb 15, 2020 at 8:27 AM
    #15
    Joe333x

    Joe333x Member

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    I notice it myself even when leaving for work, pretty much anytime that the truck has sat for awhile, search Tundra ABS self check and you'll see you're not alone. I was considered about it myself considering its brand new but after reading all the threads about it and the fact that it only happens when first driving away and then never again I stopped worrying about it. In one of the threads someone posted a pic of the owners manual where it describes it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020 at 10:39 AM
  16. Feb 15, 2020 at 9:55 AM
    #16
    Sunfish

    Sunfish [OP] New Member

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    Yes, I searched and found it. And I quote after the engine is started and the vehicle first begins to move. Having an understanding of the noises is something I'm always going to want to do. I'm still going to get some speedbleeders and change the fluid out. May look into a synthetic Thanks To all for helping me
     
  17. Feb 15, 2020 at 1:11 PM
    #17
    JohnLakeman

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    Many owners have said the ABS check occurs simultaneously with automatic door locking at about 12 mph. I've never heard mine, but I've heard the doors locking.

    Don't worry about switching over to a synthetic brake fluid...all brake fluids with a DOT rating are synthetic. Your Tundra takes DOT3. When brake fluid is advertised as being synthetic, it's true, but it's also marketing. In the US, hydraulic brake fluid has always been synthetic.

    DOT 5 silicone-based brake fluid is synthetic and non-hygroscopic (doesn't absorb water) but is also incompatible with, and can not be mixed with DOT3 and DOT4 fluids. It also can not be used in ABS brake systems.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020 at 1:23 PM
  18. Feb 15, 2020 at 1:22 PM
    #18
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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    NAPA helped me get the right speed bleeders for my 2002. You should call your local store. I paid about $15 each speed bleeder.

    Also, my year Tundra is spec’d DOT3. I’ve upgraded to Bosch DOT5.1 which is considered an upgrade. Higher boiling temps (wet and dry). Compatible with DOT3/4

    Extended service life compared to DOT3/4/5.1

    Lower viscosity, too. A little more expensive, but worth it.

    Germans make good stuff.

    upload_2020-2-15_16-21-47.jpg
     

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