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Power Steering Rack damage caused by 6 inch lift?

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014+)' started by GSXR1Kstang, Jan 8, 2016.

  1. Jan 8, 2016 at 9:08 AM
    #1
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    So far, just a Westin Bull Bar and custom made Flowmaster exhaust.
    For Third Gen (Maybe 2nd Gen also) Tundra owners:

    I've been doing plenty of research of 6 inch lifts, mainly to prevent premature wear to other components. While I'm not sure on which OEM parts need to be replaced to prevent wear to minor parts, I was told something interesting by at the local Toyota dealer.

    One of the workers advised against getting anything above a 3-4 inch lift. According to him, the lifts (combined with heavier wheels), cause the power steering rack to bend. He claimed that they constantly have lifted Tundra's coming in with steering rack problems caused by the 4+ inch lifts. He also "claims" (although I smell BS on this one), that the motor has to be pulled out just to replace the steering rack

    Has anyone had this problem or know anything about it?
     
  2. Jan 8, 2016 at 10:02 AM
    #2
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

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    I replied to ur other post, but anything up to 4" of lift is usually the safest.
     
    GSXR1Kstang likes this.
  3. Jan 8, 2016 at 10:13 AM
    #3
    PlatPro

    PlatPro New Member

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    The rack is of a car design. Yes they build it up for truck use but it is still a car design. Long term I would stay under 4" and 35" is really pushing the components at that angle. Most daily driver/ long term owners go with a 3/1 slight lift and level kit for best long run performance.
     
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  4. Jan 8, 2016 at 2:40 PM
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    equin

    equin New Member

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    Looking underneath, I'm wondering if you could just unbolt the engine mount and carefully lift the engine a bit to get the rack out.

    As far as lifts go, I think a control-arm type lift that uses spacers, coilovers or a combination thereof, that's more than 3" places the suspension and steering geometry at too high of an angle. I think that may be where the rack damage is coming from, especially when adding the weight of bigger and heavier tires. I can see ball joints and CV axles prematurely wearing with increased angles also.

    I'm wondering if a bracket-type lift, where drop-down brackets are used, would still cause steering rack damage. I'm only vaguely familiar with those, never having installed one, so I don't know. I do know they retain for the most part the suspension and CV axle angles. I don't know if they retain the tie rod angles, though, but maybe they do? If so, then I guess the bigger and heavier tires from such a lift may still place added stress on the steering rack, but at least the angles would be at or near the stock geometry.
     
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  5. Jan 9, 2016 at 4:54 PM
    #5
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    Yea, I know you replied. I just wanted to ask the question in the proper section. Thanks!!
     
  6. Jan 9, 2016 at 4:56 PM
    #6
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    I did not know that fact about the steering rack being of a car design. That must be one of the reasons for the steering being so smooth.

    Isn't there anyone out there that sells aftermarket racks that are beefed up?? My wife had a Chrysler 300 that was constantly having rack issues due to poor design. I bought an aftermarket rack and never had another problem with it.

    So you think that 35" would be too big of a tire?
     
  7. Jan 9, 2016 at 5:04 PM
    #7
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    So far, just a Westin Bull Bar and custom made Flowmaster exhaust.
    I know a lot of guys use drop brackets on 6 inch lifts, but none of them have Tundras.

    The closest I have to first hand knowledge of Tundras with 6" lifts is the dealer. My local dealer was selling lifted Tundras (brand new) and sending them to a place called Keystone Styling, located near Harrisburg, PA. That place was using Rough Country kits, and all the trucks that they did ended up being shit. Again, I wonder if it was them not installing the kits right or using Rough Country kits to begin with. Or maybe a combo of both. But I do know the trucks they were doing were coming back with rack problems.
     
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  8. Jan 10, 2016 at 8:37 AM
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    equin

    equin New Member

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    I've seen the drop-bracket lifts on 1st gen Tacomas, but not on any Tundras yet. Although they do retain the stock suspension geometry, I don't remember if that also applied to the tie rod ends and steering rack. Although these lifts do allow more room for bigger tires, they don't necessarily provide more ground clearance since the brackets supporting the suspension were lowered correspondingly, despite the bigger tires.

    I'm not familiar with the Rough Country lifts, and I don't think you can use a combination of spacers and coil overs alone to achieve 6" of lift up front by pushing down on the control arms. To achieve lift that way, you have to use available down travel, and there's only so much of it. Plus, you'll also risk breaking ball joints and CV axles if 4wd. But I could be wrong about that due to my unfamiliarity with the Tundra Rouch Country lift.
     
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  9. Jan 10, 2016 at 2:34 PM
    #9
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    So far, just a Westin Bull Bar and custom made Flowmaster exhaust.
    I've seen a lot of pictures here of 3rd Gen trucks with 6". I wonder how those guys are fairing?
     
  10. Jan 10, 2016 at 7:09 PM
    #10
    LOTSOFTOYS

    LOTSOFTOYS New Member

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    I can verify what that dealer told u. We've done quite a it of steering related repairs on trucks woth larger the 3 inch lifts. Racks, pumps... they strain alot with those larger lifts/tires. As for the rack replacement, yeah it's under the engine. Real pita to replace
     
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  11. Jan 10, 2016 at 7:27 PM
    #11
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    So far, just a Westin Bull Bar and custom made Flowmaster exhaust.
    Thats unfortunate!! :-( What would you suggest? No more than 3-4 inches? And even with only 3-4, would 35s be too heavy??
     
  12. Jan 11, 2016 at 7:14 AM
    #12
    LOTSOFTOYS

    LOTSOFTOYS New Member

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    3 to 4 inches and 35s correct. No bigger
     
  13. Jan 11, 2016 at 7:25 AM
    #13
    GSXR1Kstang

    GSXR1Kstang [OP] New Member

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    Ok, well thanks for the info! In spite of how disappointed I am in not being able to go with a 6, there are some plus sides to it. It's a lot easier to find a good 3-4 lift, and cheaper! And I won't have to worry about sacrificing ride quality and mpg!
     
  14. Jan 11, 2016 at 10:05 AM
    #14
    jberry813

    jberry813 The Mad Scientist

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    Taking tire size out of the equation, with drop bracket lifts you actually swap tie rods (driver's side to passenger and vice-versa) and then attach the tie rod to the top->down rather than bottom->up. Meaning there's actually less stress on the rack in terms of geometry than compared to a 3" coilover/spacer lift. Blaming the lift is easy since it's not a Toyota product.
     
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