1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Transfer over your build thread from a different forum to this one
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

pink / strawberry milkshake - can it happen with 3rd gen?

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014-2021)' started by TTund16, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. Apr 30, 2017 at 12:45 AM
    #1
    TTund16

    TTund16 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Member:
    #5798
    Messages:
    838
    Gender:
    Male
    @Krohsis or anyone else expert on this subject:

    do the transmission fluid lines run through the coolant radiator (lower part) like in some 4Runners or Tacomas? This is to use the coolant to "cool off" the trans fluid but over the years you may have a leak and may end up with trans fluid in coolant or visa versa hence the term pink milkshake and very costly repairs ... as a result in some 4Runners/Tacomas some recommend changing the radiator after 10 years.

    I have read that in Pre 2010? Tundras, the trans cooler is in front of the radiator and in 2011+ (or 2010+??) Tundra, the trans cooler relocated and is now on top of the radiator next to or on top of AC condenser ... are they (trans and coolant radiators) totally separate units?

    Next question is if the trans cooler (located on top of the radiator) is a totally a separate unit (i.e. no trans line runs within the coolant), then John @Krohsis mentioned something about the Tundra design for warming up the trans fluid with the coolant for example helpful in cold winters ... is this by putting the trans fluid line adjacent to coolant or do the trans fluid line run through the upper part of radiator ... you see my point and possibility of pink milkshake now due to the warm up!
     
  2. Apr 30, 2017 at 4:03 AM
    #2
    Krohsis

    Krohsis New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2016
    Member:
    #4617
    Messages:
    58
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    John
    Vehicle:
    2016 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax, 5.7L, Red
    The Gen 3 tundras have the coolant to trans fluid heat exchanger on the right side of the tranny where the thermostat for the tranny fluid is located. It is a round canister about 5 inches across. The stock trans cooler is in located in the upper part of the air conditioner condenser, maybe 7-8 passes. The tranny cooler is part of the condenser part as a whole, but obviously a separate system. You could have the same problem with rust through on the Gen 3s as others, but if you choose to replace the heat exchanger, it should be easier and cheaper than replacing an entire radiator.
     
  3. May 1, 2017 at 9:17 PM
    #3
    TTund16

    TTund16 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Member:
    #5798
    Messages:
    838
    Gender:
    Male
    correct me if i am wrong but the good news is that the heat exchanger is not as complex if I understand it correctly. Based on the pictures that I have seen, for example the transmission fluid line goes straight thru in a heat exchanger (submerged in coolant) as oppose to having 90 degrees bends when they are inside the radiator due to the design. The bends require gaskets/seals and those are the major failure points compared to straight through lines in heat exchanger and leaks due to rust which can be a common failure between the two designs ...
    I have seen pictures of inside the radiator with the seals leaking.
    in a heat exchanger, all the connections and any seals or gaskets seems to be outside the heat exchanger and easy to check for leaks. also as you mentioned, it is an easier and cheaper repair or replacement.

    Having said that lets assume
    1- you live in areas with milder winters (Not Alaska)
    2- you are not planning on selling the car
    3- if you do sell, you will remember to undo

    and now the million dollar question

    what is the argument against removing the heat exchanger and looping back the trans fluid and coolant lines (closing the loops).
    this should drop the trans fluid floor temp (relatively close to engine coolant temp) to whatever the pan or trans cooler temp is.
    I am just guessing that you can drop by at least 10-20F or maybe more!?
     
  4. May 2, 2017 at 5:46 AM
    #4
    Krohsis

    Krohsis New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2016
    Member:
    #4617
    Messages:
    58
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    John
    Vehicle:
    2016 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax, 5.7L, Red
    Yes! A man that gets it! I considered removing the coolant lines to the heat exchanger, but at this point have not. I do like what it does for the heating the trans fluid in the winter. Without it, the fluid likely would not warm up sufficiently in very cold temps. Also, without a flow diagram of the coolant system, just blocking it off may not be wise. Creating a loop that removes the exchanger would work, but putting a valve in there so you could easily open when you wanted coolant to flow through the exchanger would be my first choice. Now that I think I have adequate cooling I likely won't mess with this system.

    The heat exchanger has the transmission fluid lines coiled up in the the body of the exchanger. I'm not sure how many coils, but a guess would be 4-6. If you find a diagram, I would love to see it.

    Replacing the exchanger on high mileage or older rigs should be an easy job now. I would guess an hour or less. So that is a bonus, and maybe prevent the pink milkshake syndrome.
     
  5. May 2, 2017 at 6:30 AM
    #5
    kenomouth64

    kenomouth64 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Member:
    #5015
    Messages:
    863
    First Name:
    Tetrus
    Vehicle:
    2007 Toyota Tundra Sr5 4x4 (TRD Off Road) Crewmax 5.7L
    Hold the Line! If you are not holding the line, abandon your ship. Destruction is inevitable without more to hold the line!
    So would it be possible for a 2nd generation Tundra to have this problem?
     
  6. May 2, 2017 at 6:33 PM
    #6
    Krohsis

    Krohsis New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2016
    Member:
    #4617
    Messages:
    58
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    John
    Vehicle:
    2016 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax, 5.7L, Red
    Yes, if you have the AB60E or the AB60F also the AB760E and the AB760F trannies all have the same system. You can check the VIN sticker on the B pillar drivers side door to find out which tranny you have.
     
  7. May 2, 2017 at 8:16 PM
    #7
    TTund16

    TTund16 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Member:
    #5798
    Messages:
    838
    Gender:
    Male
    now don't go spending more money on your old 4Runner lol
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2018
  8. May 3, 2017 at 2:57 PM
    #8
    kenomouth64

    kenomouth64 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Member:
    #5015
    Messages:
    863
    First Name:
    Tetrus
    Vehicle:
    2007 Toyota Tundra Sr5 4x4 (TRD Off Road) Crewmax 5.7L
    Hold the Line! If you are not holding the line, abandon your ship. Destruction is inevitable without more to hold the line!
    I know, lol. I have not towed too much with the 4runner and I change the fluids on time every time, so I have not had that issue.

    As for the truck I thought it would not have that issue since it has a separate transmission fluid radiator. Do they not have a separate overflow? They should right?
     
  9. May 3, 2017 at 2:58 PM
    #9
    kenomouth64

    kenomouth64 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Member:
    #5015
    Messages:
    863
    First Name:
    Tetrus
    Vehicle:
    2007 Toyota Tundra Sr5 4x4 (TRD Off Road) Crewmax 5.7L
    Hold the Line! If you are not holding the line, abandon your ship. Destruction is inevitable without more to hold the line!
    I am thinking about trading it for a 1996 Toyota T100 4x4 with 320k miles.
     
  10. May 4, 2017 at 2:14 AM
    #10
    TTund16

    TTund16 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Member:
    #5798
    Messages:
    838
    Gender:
    Male
    my guess is that you were asking about the radiator pink milkshake issue in your original question and John answered yes to the possibility of the heat exchanger having the same issue ... since he had already answered no to the possibility of radiator pink milkshake issue.

    from what I understand, gen2 and gen3 both have separate trans coolers but in different locations (front vs. top), therefore no possibility of pink milkshake in either radiators.
    However, it sounds like gen2 and gen3 can have similar type heat exchanger (he listed some numbers ABxxxx) which could potentially have the "rust through" and milkshake issues.

    If you google pink or strawberry milkshake there is tons of stuff to read and worry about :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2018
    kenomouth64 likes this.
  11. May 4, 2017 at 9:12 AM
    #11
    kenomouth64

    kenomouth64 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Member:
    #5015
    Messages:
    863
    First Name:
    Tetrus
    Vehicle:
    2007 Toyota Tundra Sr5 4x4 (TRD Off Road) Crewmax 5.7L
    Hold the Line! If you are not holding the line, abandon your ship. Destruction is inevitable without more to hold the line!
    This is so me!
    I start googling potential issues with my stuff, the more I find the worse my worrying becomes, that is why I still keep my "old 4runner". 400k miles and still ticking...
     

Products Discussed in

To Top