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PCV Valve Replacement Instructions-4.7L

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by FirstGenVol, Jan 14, 2019.

  1. Jan 14, 2019 at 9:00 AM
    #1
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol [OP] New Member

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    I thought this might help people in the future. While there is a decent amount of chatter on this subject, I couldn't find actual video or instructions for the 4.7L V8. Nothing useful anyways. While this write up is specific to the 4.7L 2UZFE engine, the process should be very similar to other Toyota engines.

    For most, this should be an easy job but I actually ran into some trouble. I'm not as mechanically inclined as many here so I apologize in advance if I don't always use the correct terminology but the pictures should help. I'd like to thank @Professional Hand Model for his help as I was working on this.

    ***I'm not a mechanic and won't be held liable if you break something. Do this at your own risk.

    Tools Needed:

    I want to go ahead and state that if you're not capable or prepared to remove the vale cover then I would recommend using caution on this job. I'll explain why below.

    Step 1- remove the clamp holding the line in place with a pair of pliers. After you slide that back you can gently tug on the rubber line and it should pop right off. There is a rubber boot that sits on top of the PCV. Expect this to be in poor shape and "shedding" pieces.

    2-to give yourself more working space, disconnect the spark plug wires from the nearest ignition coil. I've found it's easiest to gently pry on the clip with a flat head screwdriver. Just be careful. There is a bundle of electrical cords running horizontally(see arrow below) that was really in my way, but can't easily be moved. You'll have to work around that as well as the cords coming out of that blue clip. Be careful when working here as there were a few times I nearly hit the wires coming out of that blue clip with my screwdriver.

    upload_2019-1-14_11-26-15.jpg



    3- Once you have everything out of the way see if you can remove the PCV with some minor to moderate pulling. In my case, I pulled with all I had and it wouldn't budge. After 17 years it appeared to be baked in place. I was actually getting nervous that I might break it off.

    4-If it appears to be stuck grab some vice grips and clamp them on the base(black part) of the PCV. Using a bit of side to side, but mostly upward force try to pull it out. I had to use a good bit of force even with the vice grips but it finally popped out.

    upload_2019-1-14_11-59-49.jpg

    5-Once the old PCV is out, use a flashlight to inspect the old grommet. Mine was nasty. At this point, use your best judgement as to whether you want to keep the original or replace it. I found one video on the 5.7L where the guy left the old grommet. I had already slightly damaged the old one as I tried to remove it so I decided to proceed with pulling it out and this is where things can go south. There really isn't a great process for this part. You simply have to get out the old grommet using a mix of cussing, prayers and redneck ingenuity. In my case the old one wouldn't come out easily so I used both a flat head screwdriver to pry and needle nose pliers to pull. It came out in pieces and naturally, gravity wants to pull them into the hole. Folks recommended using a vacuum to suck out anything that falls in the hole but even my shop vac wasn't helping.

    The circled piece is the one that fell down in the hole. I was able to retrieve it using some needle nose pliers. It came very close to being sucked into the abyss and the pucker factor was intense.

    upload_2019-1-14_11-39-34.jpg

    6-If you made it this far, take a deep breath. Once you have the old grommet removed shine your flashlight into the hole and make sure there isn't anything that needs to be dug out. Go ahead and clean the hole thoroughly before installing the new grommet. This should simply push into place

    7- Now it's time to insert the new PCV. This actually required a lot more force than I was expecting. The replacement grommet was tight. Eventually it will slide into place. Go ahead and slide the foam cover over the rubber line and insert that back onto the end of the PCV. You'll feel it pop into place. From there, put the metal clamp back into place.

    8-reconnect anything you disconnected. Most likely it will just be the wires for the ignition coil.

    I think I covered everything. If anyone has any questions or thinks I missed something please let me know.

    I will add that it's probably a good idea to replace this part for any older Tundra as my PCV valve was NASTY.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  2. Jan 14, 2019 at 9:05 AM
    #2
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ jberry813fanclub.com Staff Member

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    Nice work.
     
  3. Jan 14, 2019 at 9:07 AM
    #3
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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    Nice write up. Thanks for the credits. I disagree with one thing... Lager instead of IPA. Carry on.

    Feels good to accomplish a job like after having it pucker your cheeks a bit. Where is bmf4069?
     
    speedtre, Darkness and ColoradoTJ like this.
  4. Jan 14, 2019 at 10:09 AM
    #4
    Festerw

    Festerw New Member

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    This is interesting, I did the one on my 04 and it's threaded Toyota #12204-50030.

    Nice part is no grommet to worry about but it's a pain to get a wrench on.

    [​IMG]
     
    Casper421 likes this.
  5. Jan 14, 2019 at 10:12 AM
    #5
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol [OP] New Member

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    That is very interesting. Thanks for sharing. I wonder why they switched it. I think I would have preferred the threaded version.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2019 at 12:06 PM
    #6
    Casper421

    Casper421 Adventure in a 1st gen

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    Same here.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2019 at 2:22 PM
    #7
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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    The grommet allows for quick inspection 10 seconds max. now that its lubed up.
     
  8. Jan 16, 2019 at 6:16 AM
    #8
    Darkness

    Darkness New Member

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    Nice writing, love seeing beer in the tools and supplies section.
     
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  9. Jan 16, 2019 at 3:12 PM
    #9
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ jberry813fanclub.com Staff Member

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    Moved to Sticky.
     
  10. Jan 16, 2019 at 3:18 PM
    #10
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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  11. Jan 16, 2019 at 4:20 PM
    #11
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ jberry813fanclub.com Staff Member

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    This will be very helpful for future use for sure. Well done gentlemen. :thumbsup:
     
  12. Jan 17, 2019 at 8:36 PM
    #12
    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    Nice write up, I need to do mine fore sure. Hoping I can keep using the old grommet
     
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  13. Jan 19, 2019 at 10:42 AM
    #13
    because_wumbo-truck

    because_wumbo-truck TTC #036

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  14. Jan 24, 2019 at 6:26 PM
    #14
    markshoreline

    markshoreline New Member

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    Eric what year is your truck and what years we’re the threaded ones, if you know,,,?
     
  15. Jan 24, 2019 at 6:39 PM
    #15
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol [OP] New Member

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    Mine is an 02. I can't say whether or not they went threaded in 03 but for sure in 04 based on previous responses.
     
  16. Jan 25, 2019 at 5:12 AM
    #16
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol [OP] New Member

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    Since replacing my PCV and cleaning my MAF sensor I'm getting a full MPG more. 15.8 combined city/highway. And that's since adding the camper shell which I thought would bring it down.

    I actually thought it was a coincidence but multiple fill ups have had the same result. In the past I always got 14.8MPG.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
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  17. Mar 25, 2019 at 5:57 PM
    #17
    JSM

    JSM New Member

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    My 03 is threaded too. I just had my rear main seal done and I was going to put a new one in at the dealership because they wanted $80 to do it. I thought before I do it there let me test it. Hooked a price of 3/8 hose to it and sucked gently. Still works. Did the swap at home. Part cost me $12 at another dealership. Didn’t want to risk another seal if the PCV was clogged for some reason.

    I know the service reps make a commission but do they get commission on the parts too? The dealership where I had the work done quoted me $20 but I was able to get it for $12 at another?
     
  18. Apr 5, 2019 at 10:40 PM
    #18
    Aerindel

    Aerindel New Member

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    Just did this.....of course the rubber rim ripped off and the gromit body fell down the hole! pucker factor!



    Luckily, I was able to fish it out before it fell all the way down into the valves. I was not in a mood to take off a valve cover tonight.

    Thanks for the write up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2019
  19. Apr 12, 2019 at 7:12 AM
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    JSM

    JSM New Member

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    For what it's worth, it took longer for me to find the 22mm wrench to remove it then the actual replacement. The threaded variety is very, very simple.
     
  20. Jul 7, 2019 at 2:43 PM
    #20
    Tundra2001

    Tundra2001 2001 Tundra SR5

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    The deteriorated grommet issue on mine. Part of the grommet DID fall inside the valve cover. Fortunately, there is metal pan, for lack of a better term, that runs the length of the valve cover between the valve rockers and the the actual inside top of the valve cover. I researched this when I had my "oh sh**t" moment and confirmed it when replacing the valve cover gaskets later. I still could not access inside the metal pan area to remove the deteriorated 1/2 grommet. I figure if I can't force my way into this small, hollow area to get it out, it isn't going to work it's way out and into the valve train.
     
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  21. Jul 7, 2019 at 2:53 PM
    #21
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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    A vacuum works pretty good. In my case, I turned the cover upside down and shook it till it lined up and grabbed it with some needle nose.

    How’d your PCV look? Mine was gunked. The cover chamber slightly gunky.
     
  22. Jul 7, 2019 at 4:09 PM
    #22
    Tundra2001

    Tundra2001 2001 Tundra SR5

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    My valve train and valve cover were very clean. The cover had the usual burnt discoloration but no built up gunk. The pcv was okay. I have seen worse in 60's - 70's era cars.
     
  23. Jul 7, 2019 at 4:18 PM
    #23
    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    So your going to run it with the grommet sitting on the metal cover? That’s good to know because this has been the number one reason I haven’t changed mine yet because I’m afraid of it falling in and having to pull VC.
     
  24. Jul 7, 2019 at 4:49 PM
    #24
    Tundra2001

    Tundra2001 2001 Tundra SR5

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    I am. Short of spending potentially hours shaking the valve cover upside down to get the grommet to land just right in the hole, so that I can try to remove said grommet with the valve cover still upside down, I don't see that happening. If you can see your valve cover off, you will see the thin metal pan I am talking about. Old valve covers were completely hollow all the way to the top and the oil literally splashed against the underside of the valve cover top that you see from the outside of the engine. Not so with these valve covers. I am 99% sure that the valve cover grommet stuck between the valve cover shell that we see from the outside and the metal pan that I have attempted to describe will not make its way to the valve train area. A sigh of relief from me when I saw this. It may actually take a new valve cover to be 100% sure the old grommet isn't going anywhere.
     
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  25. Jul 7, 2019 at 5:37 PM
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    Filthyphil

    Filthyphil New Member

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    I’ve only pulled valve covers on a 5.9 dodge a 7.3 ford and a 2.7 Tacoma and all those are hollow. Had no idea about the Tundra valve covers that’s good info.
     
  26. Jul 9, 2019 at 11:15 AM
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    bmf4069

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    20190126_150839.jpg
     
  27. Jul 9, 2019 at 1:17 PM
    #27
    Tundra2001

    Tundra2001 2001 Tundra SR5

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    Do you agree with my assessment? As I recall, the space areas on the sides of the pans are not easy access either. I am guessing they are designed to allow blow-by vapors and gases from the crankcase to reach the PCV and that is about it. Very little room for much else.
     
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  28. Jul 19, 2019 at 6:31 AM
    #28
    Mjwaldron

    Mjwaldron New Member

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    On my 03 it is in fact the threaded version. Actually just did this yesterday and noticed the threads are very flat on the aftermarket PCV valve and kind of difficult to thread in. It was the same story with the factory part, tough to thread out. I only screwed in about 4 threads from the top, hopefully that’s ok? I can’t imagine much pressure? I believe the factory one was threaded in 3 from the top. Has anyone else experienced this? Thanks!
     
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  29. Jul 24, 2019 at 9:52 AM
    #29
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model Fred Brookes

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    You confirm your threads are identical on both before install? Metric and standard threads are a little different.
     
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  30. Jul 24, 2019 at 10:09 AM
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    Mjwaldron

    Mjwaldron New Member

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    They looked identical to the naked eye, but I didn’t actually check them against each other.
     
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