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My Tundra Eats Up Rotors For Breakfast

Discussion in 'General Tundra Discussion' started by Nootherids, Sep 13, 2020.

  1. Sep 13, 2020 at 9:14 AM
    #1
    Nootherids

    Nootherids [OP] New Member

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    Am I alone in this? 2013 Tundra, and new rotors and pads last maybe 3-5K miles before they start pulsating the steering wheel everytime I brake under enough speed. The brakes stop fine, the pads usually have plenty of enough life left. And every time I change both the braking and drive go back to brand new, nice and smooth.

    I've used OEM replacements before. But now I bought the Autozone Duralast Gold ones so I can replace them more regularly with the 3-year Warranty.

    So does anybody else have this problem? Is there a chance there is something wrong with my truck? Is there anything I can do?
     
  2. Sep 13, 2020 at 9:18 AM
    #2
    Danman34

    Danman34 New Member

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    Sounds like you have a caliper issue. Piston sticking most likely. What you’re experiencing is not normal.
     
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  3. Sep 13, 2020 at 9:20 AM
    #3
    AZTundra

    AZTundra No Longer a New Member

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    Either a stuck piston in the caliper or possibly not following the proper bedding procedure would be my $0.02.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2020 at 9:41 AM
    #4
    Nootherids

    Nootherids [OP] New Member

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    I was apparently wrong in the impression that the Stuck Caliper was a problem that could be identified by not being able to push the pads back into the caliper when changing. I was told that the only way to fix would be to replace the caliper. So what would the recommended solutions be in order? I.E. Should I use the brake bleeding kit rather than just keeping never disconnecting the lines to begin with...should I open up and reassemble the caliper...should I just get new calipers...etc? Note: I have never disconnected the brake fluid line at all, I just open the bleed valve then top off the reservoir after each wheel to not introduce air into the lines at all, and the brakes don't feel squishy so I don't know if air in the lines would be a likely culprit. But I listen to those that know more than I. Also note: Truck has about 110k miles, but as expected, still runs like a dream. Except for the pulsating brakes.
     
  5. Sep 13, 2020 at 9:45 AM
    #5
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    The next time you install new rotors, thoroughly wire brush the hub fit area to remove all corrosion. When installing the wheels, torque your wheel nuts in 2-3 steps using a star pattern. Check your owner manual for the torque value.
     
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  6. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:15 AM
    #6
    bleach

    bleach Resident WISEGUY

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    My brakes pulsate really bad after going down hill. I live in a hilly area and I drive about 1-1/2 mile going down hill every morning. I have to keep it 3rd so the brakes don't get over-worked. None of my other vehicles have this issue. I haven't inspected the front brakes or rotors thoroughly but they aren't that old. They're fine otherwise.
     
  7. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:20 AM
    #7
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    Do you have your old rotors? Put one or 2 at a time back on and see if the issue comes back. Like both fronts or both rears to narrow it down. You could also get a thermal temp reader and see if any are hotter than the rest. You could also try ebc pads. They supposedly help with “warped” rotors and smooth them back out.

    My 18 passenger rear was sticking. I got new pins and replaced them with a lot of brake lubricant and haven’t had the issue since.

    Have you bled the brakes? Good flow at each wheel? Brake fluid good?
     
  8. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:21 AM
    #8
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    My stock ones did that. Every time I did a lot of breaking down hills it would shake bad but would be normal again once they cooled down.
     
  9. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:23 AM
    #9
    bleach

    bleach Resident WISEGUY

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    Exactly the same here. Once I'm on level ground the brakes calm down fairly quick.
     
  10. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:26 AM
    #10
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ O'Keefe Music Foundation Staff Member

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    Use a premium rotor like Centric and a good brake pad. The box store rotors are not the best quality.

    I would suggest a caliper rebuild kit (~25.00) or troubleshoot which caliper is dragging. I would purchase a thermal temperature gun. Drive around for a bit. Stop and check what rotor(s) are hot. Start there.

    My factory rotors on my 2012 CM that I towed with a lot lasted over 55K miles.
     
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  11. Sep 13, 2020 at 11:53 AM
    #11
    deptrai

    deptrai New Member

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  12. Sep 13, 2020 at 12:10 PM
    #12
    Trident

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    My OEM rotors and pads work fine. A caveat.....I don't tow much. You can rebuild your calipers with seal/boot kits from Toyota.
     
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  13. Sep 13, 2020 at 1:46 PM
    #13
    dittothat

    dittothat New Member

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    Some things to think about: Buy a quality rotor, preferably slotted and drilled to keep them cool. Avoid heating up the rotors by braking and then hitting slush puddles if possible. As other have said, clean up the hub before applying the new rotor. Put your rotor on, tighten down with lugs and use a dial indicator to check if they’re true; purchase shims and adjust accordingly. Check your calipers to make sure none are stuck. Some of this is overkill but I can guarantee if you do all of the above you’ll be wearing through your rotors before they warp
     
  14. Sep 13, 2020 at 2:30 PM
    #14
    blackdemon_tt

    blackdemon_tt New Member

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    You may want to replace your guide pins on the calipers as they are probably making constant contact with the rotor, therefore overheating it and warping it... Are your pads wearing evenly?? I would start here, and if it persists, then replacing the calipers.
     
  15. Sep 13, 2020 at 3:45 PM
    #15
    blanchard7684

    blanchard7684 New Member

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    When replacing rotors or brakes get a temp gun and check rotors. Should be within 20-30 degrees of each other side to side.

    may help figure out which caliper is sticking.
     
  16. Sep 13, 2020 at 8:14 PM
    #16
    BlueDream

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    Lug Nuts Not torqued correctly = warped rotors. Kids at tire shops blow em on with air guns.
     
  17. Sep 13, 2020 at 10:25 PM
    #17
    ZPMAN

    ZPMAN 2nd place is the 1st looser

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    No offense but I hope you are driving with one foot instead of two.
     
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  18. Sep 14, 2020 at 6:53 AM
    #18
    bleach

    bleach Resident WISEGUY

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    Well how else can you eat and drive? ;)

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Sep 14, 2020 at 9:04 AM
    #19
    runCMD

    runCMD BAMF Nerd

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    Best advice right here. I also notice you are running bigger tires. I found that once I upgraded to 35s I started having the wobble after heavy usage. I upgraded to Power Stop Extreme Truck and Tow (drilled/slotted) and problems went away. Also definitely torque your lug nuts properly.
     
  20. Sep 14, 2020 at 9:28 AM
    #20
    frichco228

    frichco228 Valued Member

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    Based on the many threads here about pulsing brakes it seems clear that front brakes on at least 3rd Gen Tundras do have some issues and weaknesses. My 2016 has some pulse as well, most notable when braking on a downhill grade. Had the pulse since I purchased the truck used back in January with only 33k miles. I am now about to hit 40k miles. Still does it a bit at times.

    One thing I did when I first got the truck was an "Italian brake job"- I basically rebed the brakes by making several firm stops from speed down to about 5mph. Not stopping is key, just down to about 5mph and then accelerate and another firm stop. Do that 5-10 times like you would do to set brand new brakes. It helps clean up any crud or residue on the rotors and pads and can often help with pulsing and smooth the feel of brake operation. In my case, it did help a bit.

    So I feel your pain. Mine is not yet bad enough to go through and replace rotors but I will definitely be upgrading to better rotors and pads when it is time.
     
  21. Sep 19, 2020 at 11:31 AM
    #21
    Jsena

    Jsena Trend setter, not a follower!!

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    Anyone know the steps to remove the Rear Rotor 2017
     
  22. Sep 19, 2020 at 11:38 AM
    #22
    bleach

    bleach Resident WISEGUY

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    I did this once on a Honda Civic we once owned. I got about 8K miles out of a set of their pads instead of 15K like I usually did with OEM pads. Luckily I was able to get a refund from AZ.
     
  23. Sep 19, 2020 at 2:18 PM
    #23
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    Just unbolt the caliper and gently hammer it off. The lug nuts hold it on, but obviously can’t remove it if the caliper is in the way. Takes about 15 min including removing your tire and raising the truck.
     
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  24. Sep 23, 2020 at 8:25 PM
    #24
    SuperWhite20

    SuperWhite20 New Member

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    Your parking brake shoes are inside the hat. Might need to back off the shoes if the rear rotors are difficult to remove.
     
  25. Sep 25, 2020 at 12:20 PM
    #25
    irloyal

    irloyal New Member

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    Never had a pulsing problem on any vehicle that didn't turn out to be a rotor warp or BAD TIRES. Sometimes rotating tire will solve it since there can be a bad match on balance. I had an 85 Mustang GT that was very particular about tires on the front. They were all spin balanced, and I took em-back thinking that the tire guy screwed up. Since they were brand new tires, the tire guy said it happens sometimes, and rotated the tires one at a time around the car. On the third try the pulse went away. Didn't touch the rotors or rebalance the tires, just found the sweet spot. The crazy thing is these were good potenza's and each wheel weighed the same (factory stock). Never had a problem with the next set I bought so.....
     
  26. Sep 25, 2020 at 12:56 PM
    #26
    Randy Morton

    Randy Morton Life takes its toll, please have exact change.

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    I just had the brakes done on my 2012 and the rotors didn't even need to be turned, and that's at 80,000 miles. Are you sure the parking brake is fully disengaging? I've also seen rotors warp because the driver slams on the parking brake and tight as possible when the rotors are hot. If there's a little drag heating up the rotor, the parking brake can warp it just enough to be aggravating.
     
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