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Mountain Hunting Gear

Discussion in 'Guns & Hunting' started by Stroke250, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. Jan 10, 2019 at 7:20 PM
    #31
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ Professional Cat Herding Expert Staff Member

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    The wolves are beautiful animals for sure. Destructive...and ranchers/hunters hate them more than anything else.
     
    Stroke250 [OP] likes this.
  2. Jan 10, 2019 at 7:22 PM
    #32
    zcarpenter92

    zcarpenter92 Yotas, Coronas and 'Merica

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    Will be following this thread, have hunted deer out here on the plains but want to get into elk and other mountain game. My coworker is a big fan of Sitka and KUIU gear himself.
     
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  3. Jan 10, 2019 at 7:27 PM
    #33
    War Machine

    War Machine Premium Elite Member

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    I only opened this to see if you guys really hunted mountains. You’re not, so good day.
     
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  4. Jan 10, 2019 at 7:27 PM
    #34
    Stroke250

    Stroke250 [OP] New Member

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    Heck yeah! Kuiu gets my vote from a covering all needs basis.

    Check out the Sixsite stuff! Top of the line as well! They are continuing to add gear to their offerings.
     
  5. Jan 10, 2019 at 8:05 PM
    #35
    zcarpenter92

    zcarpenter92 Yotas, Coronas and 'Merica

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    It all looks like high quality stuff, not sure if the pattern of the SixSite matches up to Colorado as well as some of the other ones I’ve seen. I’d think the Natural Gear original pattern or even RealTree is a better fit here.
     
    Stroke250 [OP] likes this.
  6. Jan 10, 2019 at 8:07 PM
    #36
    duece292

    duece292 Pennsylvania Hillbilly Deluxe

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    I've been drop camp hunting for elk, in Colorado since 2004. I hunt 3rd rifle season so my gear is kind of centered around colder weather. This is some of what I've found that works well for me. I have several pieces of light weight, breathable clothing from Sitka and Cabelas but my go to is wool. IMO, merino wool can't be beat. It'll keep you warm even when it's soaked, it's available in lighter weights, it's naturally antimicrobial and scent proof and it's 100 percent silent. Tall boots with a stiff shank. Mountainous travel requires boots that give you alot of support. Steep hillsides and rocky terrain will twist an ankle really quick. I prefer a 10 or 11 inch, 4 to 600 gram leather boot like Kenetrek or Meindl. A good pair of gaiters is also a must. I prefer Outdoor Research. They'll keep your pant legs and boots from getting wet, muddy, full of snow and shredded. A neck gaiter. It's small, light, easily stuffed in a pocket and indespensible when the temp drops. Good gloves. I prefer leather gloves. A couple of flashlights and a headlamp for when you need to be hands free. A GPS, a waterproof paper topo map of your hunting area and a compass. I love my GPS but there may come a time when it doesn't work and sometimes it's just easier to navigate with a map and compass. A side note, my maglights, Gerber Carnivore headlamp and Garmin GPS all run on AA's. I only use lithium ion batteries and only need one size. I also use a small Goal Zero solar panel for charging a camera or cellphone. A good backpack. Frame pack or day pack, find one with a supportive waist belt. Keeping the weight on your hips will save your back. Two good, sharp knives, a sharpener and a folding saw. I carry an old buck folding knife and a skeletonized caping knife and a Clawhorn carbide sharpener. Nothing dulls a knife quicker than elk hair. A water filter. I use a Sawyer Mini. There are alot of filters out there, some better than others, some smaller than others. Staying hydrated is important but never trust the water in that beautiful, gin clear, little mountain stream. Giardia is not your friend! Survival gear is dependent on how far and long you're going but should be an important part of your pack. I carry some waterproof matches, fire starter material (duct tape works great), a lighter, paracord, an emergency space blanket, a small plastic poncho and a few energy bars. I carry other stuff as well but you at least want the basics if you get stuck spending the night in the woods. Game bags. 350 inches of bone is great but the meat is where it's at. Game bags will keep dirt and bugs off of all that wonderful protein. A handgun. Something that you can shoot accurately. In places with high numbers of cats and bears, like the Bob in Idaho, a gunshot is like ringing the dinner bell and you don't want to be caught unarmed, working on your elk, by a hungry griz. I carry a Ruger SP101 .357.
    That's just some of my gear. Yours will depend on alot of factors. Time of year, where and how far you go, how long you go for, if you go alone or with others. One of the MOST IMPORTANT things and it was mentioned before is to make sure someone knows exactly where you're going, how long you'll be gone, who you're with, where you parked, etc. Accidents happen, people get lost, the weather takes a turn for the worse, what ever the case, someone should know where to start looking.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2019 at 8:37 PM
    #37
    duece292

    duece292 Pennsylvania Hillbilly Deluxe

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    One other important thing in your elk arsenal should be anything that helps to keep you clean and scent free. Soap, spray, wipes, baking soda. Use them all and use them alot. An elks sense of smell is 10 times that of a whitetail. They will smell you and they will leave the area. Usually quickly and quietly, long before you see them. And unlike a deer that goes a hundred yards and stops, elk go ALOT farther before they stop. Anything that helps you stay clean is a must. I use Dead Down Wind and Wildlife Research products and use baking soda in a storage bag for my clothes, in my boots and to brush my teeth with.
    Cleanliness is next to elkliness
     
  8. Jan 11, 2019 at 5:55 AM
    #38
    Stroke250

    Stroke250 [OP] New Member

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    Thanks Greg! That was a lot info but all very informative and useful!!
     
  9. Jan 11, 2019 at 6:16 AM
    #39
    Stroke250

    Stroke250 [OP] New Member

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    The pattern is for sure different but I like different. Haha Kuiu has some unique pattern as well.
     
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  10. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:11 PM
    #40
    PMG

    PMG New Member

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    No, we've got wolves here. Savages too, but they're in politics mainly.
     
  11. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:40 PM
    #41
    Uhhhh....

    Uhhhh.... New Member

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    Don't know if you've ever watched Randy Newberg before, but he's awesome. Used to have a great show called On Your Own Adventures. He's a huge advocate of using our land - public lands - to the fullest. He lives in Montana & hunts all over. Check him out on YouTube - tons of hunting videos - and it's not just about the kill shot, which is what I love about his shows. He explains and teaches thoroughly - all from planning the hunt, to tactics while hunting, to skinning/quartering/packing it out. Beginning to end. Here's a video of his gear for elk hunting & elk camp: https://youtu.be/Wr_QcASb1Z0

    I've been watching him quite a bit lately cause I'll hopefully be finally fulfilling a childhood dream of mine & moving out to Colorado in the next year or two (in Virginia, originally PA). Ever since I started getting Field & Stream magazines in middle school and saw the amazing beauty of Colorado, I've wanted to be there (visited a couple times). Rabbit hole...

    Randy Newberg and Steve Rinella (Meat Eater show) are my two fav to watch, mainly cause it's not all about the kill. It's just as much, if not more, about what goes into it - the preparation, the execution of the plan, and the immense satisfaction (and cooking!) afterwards. Above vid is a great start for gear ideas - he's been elk hunting for going on 3 decades I believe.
     
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  12. Jan 11, 2019 at 12:59 PM
    #42
    Stroke250

    Stroke250 [OP] New Member

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    I have been watching both of them as late!
     
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  13. Jan 11, 2019 at 1:20 PM
    #43
    zcarpenter92

    zcarpenter92 Yotas, Coronas and 'Merica

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    Meat Eater is a favorite of mine, Rinella does an excellent job of showing all things involved in hunting big game. Haven't watched any of the cooking episodes yet, but I have no doubt they're excellent. Its downright awesome having a good hunting show on Netflix.
     
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  14. Jan 17, 2019 at 5:58 AM
    #44
    Stroke250

    Stroke250 [OP] New Member

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    So what about packs? It’s too bad my Osprey hiking pack is not setup for hunting so I’ll probably have to add another. Mystery Ranch? Eberlestock? Stone Glacier? Anyone with experience with any of these?
     
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