1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

lug nuts

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by tank, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. Apr 30, 2015 at 7:09 PM
    #1
    tank

    tank [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Member:
    #1243
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2006 Tundra
    Tonneau, hard shell, 4.6 l engine
    Take my word for it, six lug studs with nuts sheared off at the thread bases at 55 mph and watching your tire bounce away ranks right up there with hearing bullets hit a wall next to you and explosions lifting you off the ground. I suggest you always check your own torque. I asked a service dept. manager what it should be and he told me 83 lbs, then a week later he told me 86 lbs, a tire dealership tech told me 97, then a tech at another location for the same company told me 85, and you guys told me 85. My lug holes show ovaling of three holes that form a tightening "triangle" as if they were not tightened properly.

    Don't trust your life with a stranger when it comes to running gear. I also had a tech argue with me that he had fixed my brakes correctly, then two weeks later I pressured the service manager to drive it and I got agreement and a repair done then. You wouldn't hand a loaded gun to a stranger, would you?

    Pictures of my old '06? Not worth it. It is still my "old reliable" but it has seen some rough wear and use in the weather and mountains of Montana.
     
  2. Apr 30, 2015 at 8:47 PM
    #2
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2014
    Member:
    #6
    Messages:
    10,869
    Gender:
    Male
    Colorado
    Welcome!

    Times like this is why I'm happy I have a personal friend who is a Toyota tech where I know he will do everything 100% and do what's listed in his procedures.
     
  3. Apr 30, 2015 at 9:27 PM
    #3
    Wynnded

    Wynnded Wait, what?

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2014
    Member:
    #379
    Messages:
    617
    Gender:
    Male
    Rockies
    Vehicle:
    2011 RCSB 5.7L AWD Tundra
    OEM Upgrades
    Agreed. After I have my tires balanced, I drive the one mile home on surface roads and retorque them myself loosening them first and beginning from scratch. I guess I could do it at the tire shop, but typically forget my torque wrench. :eek:
    Also, my owners manual says that the alloys are tightened to 97 lb-ft.
     
  4. May 1, 2015 at 9:48 AM
    #4
    dan0229

    dan0229 New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2015
    Member:
    #1250
    Messages:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dan
    Lawrenceville GA
    Vehicle:
    2015 black TRD 4x4
    Can you ask your tech friend if the service advisor was correct that starting off and hearing a "clunk" at 15mph is normal? The ABS?
     
  5. May 1, 2015 at 6:46 PM
    #5
    tank

    tank [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Member:
    #1243
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2006 Tundra
    Tonneau, hard shell, 4.6 l engine
    The only clunk I hear from my 06 is when I go into or out of 4 wheel while moving at various speeds. A clunk involving an ABS? No, I only hear whines when it is working.
     
  6. May 1, 2015 at 6:55 PM
    #6
    tank

    tank [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Member:
    #1243
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2006 Tundra
    Tonneau, hard shell, 4.6 l engine
     
  7. May 1, 2015 at 7:03 PM
    #7
    Mike

    Mike Tread lightly.

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Member:
    #87
    Messages:
    2,560
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    south carolina
    Vehicle:
    2003 tundra sr5 4x4 stepside....
    yep bank account is running low from it..
    Sounds like he used a air gun to tighten them up... if he did final torque with the gun not a wrench, then I would say you have a 50/50 chance that the studs are over stressed ( too much torque and racheting down by the gun) Studs dont take much to over stress them there is a reason for that.

    I was a shop owner and saw a tech doing that I would fire him on the spot.
     
  8. May 1, 2015 at 9:41 PM
    #8
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Member:
    #38
    Messages:
    8,834
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brian
    Broomfield, CO
    Vehicle:
    2012 Rock Warrior 5.7L 4X4
    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    100 lb-ft is what i have always done on every vehicle i have owned. Never had and issue and has always left me with peace of mind.

    Do it yourself if you want it done to your expectations.
     
  9. May 2, 2015 at 5:17 PM
    #9
    tank

    tank [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Member:
    #1243
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2006 Tundra
    Tonneau, hard shell, 4.6 l engine
    Thanks, Mike. I have seen Les Schwab techs use the air wrenches to tighten them, then use a torque wrench to check it. of course, if it is already at 100+, then your wrench will "crack" at a lower level where you set it, for instance 85. Les Schwab is not alone. I have seen nearly every tech change tires and do it that way. They shouldn't be allowed to get near a lug nut except to remove it. The old issue of time is money and if it takes less time, we make more money!
     
  10. May 2, 2015 at 5:26 PM
    #10
    tank

    tank [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2015
    Member:
    #1243
    Messages:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2006 Tundra
    Tonneau, hard shell, 4.6 l engine
    Viper, normally I would agree with you, but not in this case. I paid good money to have a supposedly trained auto tech do a job and it was not done correctly. As for doing it myself in these instances, your logic would apply to surgery. Would you just take a local anesthetic and do your own heart stent, appendix removal, or heart transplant. If you are interested in doing it right, then you should do it yourself. However, I doubt that you, like me, have any surgical training and I sure don't have the tools for surgery, so how am I obligated to have to come behind incompetent techs and do it myself, other than my own safety, of course. Give me an m-60 tank and I could do maintenance on it, but I was trained for that, and in 22 years I never had a tank that was mine develop a mechanical problem due to my negligence. That is the issue here, I am not trained, and in any case, I did not ask the idiots to rotate my tires and overstress the lug bolts. I am 67, and have never lost a tire, lug nut, nor had my brakes fail as I have had with this firm in Helena, so why should I expect anything different now when it never happened before? I was just trying to give everyone a heads up on what could result in death or serious injury.
     
  11. May 3, 2015 at 10:05 PM
    #11
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Member:
    #38
    Messages:
    8,834
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brian
    Broomfield, CO
    Vehicle:
    2012 Rock Warrior 5.7L 4X4
    Some Mods :) See build thread for details
    Oh I def agree. There are people that shouldn't be mechanics that get hired by a shop (unknowingly I hope) that cut corners risking your safety for a paycheck.
     
To Top