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Lug Nut Stud

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by WhitmanTundra, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:02 AM
    #1
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    Alexis
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    Hey guys, I have a two part question

    Part 1: Is there any difference, in the process, not the part, between replacing a FRONT lug nut stud versus a REAR lug nut stud?

    I have been looking up YouTube videos and mechanic forums, and every example is done on a rear hub assembly. I assume that with the parking brake and such that performing a lug nut stud replacement on a front assembly should be easier? But I can't seem to validate this assumption.
    Can anyone here tell me if there is a difference?

    Part 2: I know I have seen posts on here from a Toyota parts dealer. Does anyone know how to get a hold of him? Ideally I'd like to replace my studs with Toyota parts if possible. If not, I can order from NAPA, but I have tried very hard to keep all original parts on the truck.
    I don't have any reason for trying to keep all Toyota branded parts when replacing stuff, but I just have.

    Thank you
     
  2. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:06 AM
    #2
    osidepunker

    osidepunker OsidePunker

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    I replaced the fronts. Its pretty easy. Hammer out the old and spin the rotor to the largest opening in the dust shield; you'll still have to bend it a little.

    then press in the new one using your preferred method. I chose to use a nut to pull it through but the correct way is to disassemble the hub and press in the new stud with a hydraulic press.
     
  3. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:09 AM
    #3
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    Did you just replace one of your fronts?
    Or while you where down there working on one of them did you just replace all 5 to prevent having to replace anymore?

    I don't have a hydraulic press, so I would be using the "nut over the stud and ratcheting down to pull through" method
     
  4. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:12 AM
    #4
    osidepunker

    osidepunker OsidePunker

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    I replaced all ten for the front. I didnt bother doing the rear because I have wheel spacers in the rear.

    Get several grade 8 open faced nuts and use a washer between the nut and the hub face so you dont booger up the hub.

    Pay close attention to the stud because you need to make sure it is truly pulled through all the way.

    Be careful not to strip the nut or stud because then you will have to extract and start over haha
     
    15whtrd and Pinay like this.
  5. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:16 AM
    #5
    Mcoop

    Mcoop Throbbing Member

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    @Roman is your Toyota parts guru. He can hook you up with the lug studs. Just send him a PM.
     
    15whtrd, Roman and WhitmanTundra [OP] like this.
  6. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:17 AM
    #6
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    Thank you so very much.
    This seems pretty straight forward.
    I greatly appreciate the tips and tricks.

    Since you had such luck - did you find that one particular brand or manufacture of lug studs are better than another?
     
    osidepunker likes this.
  7. Feb 19, 2020 at 8:19 AM
    #7
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    THANK YOU!
     
  8. Feb 19, 2020 at 9:12 AM
    #8
    osidepunker

    osidepunker OsidePunker

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    I switched my stud size to 9/16-18 so I used Dorman studs
     
    WhitmanTundra [OP] likes this.
  9. Feb 19, 2020 at 9:44 AM
    #9
    blackoutt

    blackoutt YEAH BUDDY!

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    ^^^ This. Use a couple thick washers and grease them and the threads up, they should be easy to draw in without creating too much heat in the threads that way or killing your ratchet arm (no offense). Then clean the grease back off, lug nut torques are spec'd dry.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
    osidepunker likes this.
  10. Feb 19, 2020 at 9:59 AM
    #10
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    To be clear: grease the 2 washers and the threads of the stud?
    Will grease from the washer which is touching the hub assembly, get grease into the hold the stud is coming into?
    I assume it'd be best to NOT grease where the stud is going so it is not easily removed?

    Is a copper based lubricant sufficient to use for this?
    Or would a silicone paste be better?

    I use both for when I change my brakes and such, but each has a different application.
     
  11. Feb 19, 2020 at 10:13 AM
    #11
    blackoutt

    blackoutt YEAH BUDDY!

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    Put the stud through the hole, dab of grease between the two flat washers over the stud (so they spin easy on each other), dab of grease on the threads in the open nut you're using to draw the stud through so that it's threads stay slippery/cool. You don't want grease in the hole the stud is coming through, that knurled press fit should stay dry. I just use the standard tacky red grease that's in my grease gun but I think any lube will work, you're going to wash it off anyway.
     
  12. Feb 19, 2020 at 10:16 AM
    #12
    WhitmanTundra

    WhitmanTundra [OP] New Member

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    This is tremendously helpful.
    Thank you!
     
  13. Feb 19, 2020 at 10:25 AM
    #13
    osidepunker

    osidepunker OsidePunker

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    and by the way, grease or oil on the stud or nut will not affect it. As long as you torque fasteners properly, they will stay tight even with lubricant.
     
    WhitmanTundra [OP] and 15whtrd like this.
  14. Feb 19, 2020 at 1:00 PM
    #14
    blackoutt

    blackoutt YEAH BUDDY!

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    Caution, lubed fasteners will be preloaded more when tightened to same torque. This could cause future stud failures. Lug nuts torques are spec'd dry.

    https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/torque-lubrication-effects-d_1693.html
     
    WhitmanTundra [OP] likes this.
  15. Feb 22, 2020 at 1:41 PM
    #15
    Spaceiscool

    Spaceiscool Something something.. danger zone?

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    Thats awesome to hear. I lost a stud today on the front driver side. Started to feel a slight vibration, pulled over and noticed my missing lugnut. Some of the lugnuts were loose. Yikes!
     
  16. Jun 15, 2021 at 1:06 PM
    #16
    flyingJC

    flyingJC New Member

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    Lisle 22800 Wheel Stud Installer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000ETUD22/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_88NFVHS929M87E20B5ED

    This helped me tremendously - slip it over the bolt, use air wrench to draw bolt head flush using old lug nut, done!

    whatever you do, do NOT just tighten lug nut against the hub without washers or bolts. Unless you want to have to cut both bolt and cross threaded lug nut off using an angle grinder and an air chisel. In that case, by all means, be my guest!

    To get the old bolts out, put an old lug nut on, smack with hammer. This mushrooms the end of the lug nut, and not the bolt.

    o’reilleys sells both wheel studs and lug nuts.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2021

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