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Loose Rotors

Discussion in 'Other Toyota Vehicles' started by BTB2013Sequoia, Jun 29, 2020.

  1. Jun 29, 2020 at 7:11 PM
    #1
    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Hi Tundra Nation,

    I have a 2013 Sequoia (Tundra Chassis)my passenger rear roter slips and clicks when I start from a stop. It appears the holes in the rotor are about an 1/16” larger then the lugs and the gap is just enough to make a click as the lugs contact the edge of the hole and propel the rotor around. I did replace the rotors recently but used OEM Toyota Rotors. Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. Jun 29, 2020 at 7:16 PM
    #2
    BIGUGLY

    BIGUGLY I the SheepDog. I have the capacity for Violence.

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    Is it possible the studs have been worn down due to it slipping and its not the rotors?
     
  3. Jun 29, 2020 at 7:18 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Great thought, the lugs still seem to have full thread on them, don’t appear to be warn.
     
  4. Jun 29, 2020 at 7:47 PM
    #4
    landphil

    landphil Socially distant and prone to wandering.

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    If your wheel nuts are torqued correctly, the rotors aren’t moving against the axleshaft. It’s very normal that the holes in a rotor are larger than the studs.

    The noise you’re hearing is probably the brake pads shifting back and forth in the caliper bracket.
     
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  5. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:05 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Thanks for the advice, I visually confirmed the noise today with the vehicle on jack stands and the rear wheels off, when my son put the vehicle in gear, forward then reverse, with the break on, I could see the lugs shift back and forth against the roter holes and make a clicking noise, granted the lugs were not tight at that point but the clicking sound was identical. I could repeat my test with the lugs nuts on without the tire on and see if the lugs still move back and forth. I’ll also check the break pads when I’m in there.
     
  6. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:16 PM
    #6
    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    If the wheels are torqued correctly, and you have the correct lug nuts for the wheels, then it is just about impossible for the rotors to move. When the lug nuts are tightened, they compress the wheel, and rotor against the hub assembly, and nothing should move
     
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  7. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:22 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    I totally agree, that’s why I’m so confused. :monocle:
    Hoping someone out there has run across this.
    :fingerscrossed:
    Thanks everyone!
     
  8. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:25 PM
    #8
    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    As an earlier post suggested, the most likely cause is the brake pads are loose in the caliper, and are shifting back and forth. Have the brakes been done recently? It is not uncommon for someone to forget to install the small spring clips that are supposed to keep the pads from shifting.
     
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  9. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:26 PM
    #9
    Black@Blue19

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    ^^^^Lugs/axle worn???
     
  10. Jun 29, 2020 at 8:29 PM
    #10
    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    If the lugs were worn, then the wheel would also be loose. Another thought, are they the original wheels? If the wheels were replaced, and the center hub of the wheel is too small, then it would not fit the hub correctly, and this could allow the wheel to appear tight, but it isn't compressed against the rotor properly.
     
  11. Jun 29, 2020 at 9:19 PM
    #11
    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    It still has the original wheels and lug nuts. I replaced the breaks when I replaced the roter, I installed the spring clips with the pads but will pull them apart again and verify.
     
  12. Jun 29, 2020 at 10:05 PM
    #12
    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    I suppose you could try putting vehicle on jackstands again, remove the rear wheels, using large flat washers to take up the extra space, tighten the lug nuts until they are tight against rotor. At this point, the rotor should not move on hub. If the hub/rotor moves as one, and you still hear the noise, there are only two possibilities, the brake pads are moving in the caliper, or you have a problem with how the parking brakes were installed/adjusted.
     
  13. Jun 29, 2020 at 10:37 PM
    #13
    FWD Tundra

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    Have you owned this rig since new?
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  14. Jun 29, 2020 at 11:23 PM
    #14
    TFT

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    Do you have the old rotors? Could you measure the thickness of the old vs the new rotor? I believe the rotor slides over the lugs, and is compressed by the lug nuts. If the new rotor is thinner where the wheel should be compressed with lug nuts, it could be loose. The lug nuts might be bottoming out, leaving the wheel loose.

    Good luck.
     
  15. Jun 30, 2020 at 2:20 AM
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    FWD Tundra

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    Somebody may have at one time put the wrong lug nuts on that wheel. As TFT said it may be bottoming out and not tightening up enough to keep the rotor tight.
     
  16. Jun 30, 2020 at 7:17 AM
    #16
    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Awww the parking break! I did tighten the break line recently because it seemed loose. I had adjusted the parking break when I replaced the main breaks with the star nuts but the parking break did not hold the vehicle back when I put it in gear and let off the break so I took some slack out of the cable under the drivers seat. Now the p break works good, what is the proper way to adjust the p break? Did I screw it up somehow?
     
  17. Jun 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM
    #17
    TechWrench

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    Yes, there is a Toyota procedure for properly adjusting the parking brake system. It is a bit too long and complicated to present here. But, the first place to start is properly adjusting the parking brake shoe system inside the rear Rotors. That I can explain fairly easily. Your making an adjustment to the cable, (I am assuming you did this inside the center console), may complicate the proper adjustment at the rear wheels, but here goes.

    Jack the rear up, and support rear axle on jack stands. Remove rear wheels. This next part is assuming the parking brake components inside the rotor are properly installed and working correctly. There is supposed to be a rubber plug in a hole in the face of the rotor, outside the arc of the lug bolt holes. You have to remove this plug, and rotate the disc so that hole is in approximately the 6 o'clock position. With the adjustment hole in this position, you should be able to reach the star wheel adjuster with a narrow straight blade screw driver. At this point you should use at least two lug nuts with spacers to snug the rotor against the hub so it won't wobble when turned. Using the screw driver, turn the teeth on the star wheel up one at a time until the rotor will no longer rotate. Once the rotor won't turn, back off on the adjuster about 8 teeth (clicks). The rotor should turn freely. Check the parking brake pedal inside cab. It should lock the parking brakes without bottoming out. If it does bottom out without fully engaging the parking brake shoes, then the cable adjustment needs to be done. Considering this is a parking brake system, and not an Emergency braking system, if properly adjusted, it is designed to hold the vehicle from moving when on level ground with the gearshift in the drive position and at idle. It is not designed to hold the vehicle on a steep incline. When I adjust my system, I tend to only back off the star wheel adjuster about 6 clicks (I like to have the brakes grab a bit sooner) But the important thing is that the rotor will turn freely, without significant drag, or you will wear out the shoes too quickly. Once you have the adjustment done to your satisfaction, then reinstall the rubber plug in the adjustment hole, remove the lug nuts locking the rotor to the hub, reinstall the wheels and torque the lugs to the correct setting for your wheels.

    Again, assuming the parking brake shoe system is installed correctly and functions as it is designed, you should be done.
     
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  18. Jun 30, 2020 at 4:24 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Thanks so much for your detailed response!!!

    I found this video on adjusting the breaks, if seems consistent with your explanation, thought I’d share it if it helps anyone else.
    https://youtu.be/p19-geSIkq4

    I took the whole assembly apart again today, adjusted the break, reinstalled the break pads and visually checked everything I could think of For any signs of trouble.

    The break pad shims and metal clips were all installed and looked good.

    upload_2020-6-30_17-17-49.jpg

    upload_2020-6-30_17-18-31.jpg

    I reassembled the wheel and tightened the lugs without the wheel on and I agree the click is not from the rotor moving against the lugs, but unfortunately it is still clicking.

    If the click is not from the rotor or the breaks any other idea what else would cause it?

    Thanks again for you time.
     
  19. Jun 30, 2020 at 4:40 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Hi Everyone!

    Yesterday I posted that I had a click in my rear passenger side tire area. I thought the rotor was loose but based on some great reply’s and advice, I did some investigation today and ruled that out, I also confirmed that the parking break was adjusted correctly and the clips and shims were installed in the break pads.

    Has anyone experienced a similar noise? Any advice would be appreciated.

    Brett
     
  20. Jun 30, 2020 at 5:14 PM
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    Tundra234

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    Any way of getting a video or audio clip?
     
  21. Jun 30, 2020 at 6:06 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

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  22. Jun 30, 2020 at 7:19 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

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  23. Jun 30, 2020 at 7:51 PM
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    Rotaryphoneuser

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    Damn...i have no idea. That would drive me nuts. I hope someone here knows.
     
  24. Jun 30, 2020 at 8:49 PM
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    BTB2013Sequoia

    BTB2013Sequoia [OP] New Member

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    Me too!!! Thanks
     
  25. Jun 30, 2020 at 8:50 PM
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    TTund16

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    I have bought parts and specifically brake parts from auto stores that didn't fit well and had issues ... I would make sure the parts meet the spec.

    I have also bought parts from dealer and never had any issues. they are more expensive but the quality control is better I think.

    I have a post about brake parts from AutoZone in another thread. it was Duralast Rear brakes for an older car and each side had a different problem. One side was Chinese made and the other side was made in Mexico and both were Duralast Gold but one side didn't fit correctly and the other side fit but had another issue. I had to exchange one side and was able to fix the issue on the other side. The 2 sides were NOT built to the same spec. ... I had bought the front ones from dealer several years prior to that and it was a perfect fit but a little more expensive.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  26. Jun 30, 2020 at 8:55 PM
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    landphil

    landphil Socially distant and prone to wandering.

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    What I can’t tell from the video is the location the sound is coming from, so if you’re 100% sure it is from one or both brakes areas, then this might not make sense.

    But I’d give the the driveshaft a good shake and check the u-joints and slip spline for any play. Do this with the trans in neutral, or the rear axle on stands with the parking brake released so there isn’t tension on the driveshaft. If the u-joints are greaseable then lube ‘em up too.

    You could also firmly apply the parking brake, and shift from D to R and back without stepping on the brake pedal, and see if the clicking is still present.
     
  27. Jun 30, 2020 at 9:07 PM
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    empty_lord

    empty_lord They see me rollin'

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    Looks like your pads are missing the little spring clip things on the ears. They should be installed on the bottom of the pad. They put a little pressure on the pad onto the other side of the holder to keep them from slapping around... ideally. Not all the time, sometimes some pads just click around


    I believe sequoias have them. Most Toyota’s do. Been a while since I’ve done rears on a sequoia
     
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  28. Jun 30, 2020 at 9:12 PM
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    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    OK, after listening to the video, and watching it, I am also pretty sure the noise is not coming from the brakes. It looks like the rear wheels are not moving at all when you shift from drive to reverse and back, which would petty much eliminate the brake pads. From the video, it looks like the noise occurs as the drive shaft changes rotation. This would lead my to suggest you look closely at the u-joints, the bolts securing the driveshaft flanges to the differential and rear of transfer case, and the slip joint in the rear driveshaft.

    What I might suggest is using a length of hose as a listening device to try to pinpoint exactly where the noise is coming from. If you have them, or can get a set, I would also suggest you put the rear of the vehicle up on a set of ramps. This would allow extra clearance under the vehicle, while still keeping the rear wheels from moving while shifting gears. Just be careful.
     
  29. Jun 30, 2020 at 9:15 PM
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    TechWrench

    TechWrench New Member

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    From what I can see the caliper has the spring shims in place both above and below the pads. If you are referring to the wire springs, I believe they are only on the front brake calipers that use pins to hold the pads in place.
     
  30. Jun 30, 2020 at 9:19 PM
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    empty_lord

    empty_lord They see me rollin'

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    The little squealers for the pads. I can’t think of a technical name for em

    They come with the OEM shim kit
     
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