1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Transfer over your build thread from a different forum to this one
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Dash cam - Genius DVR-FHD590 - Installation and Review

Discussion in 'Audio & Video' started by Netmonkey, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. Apr 29, 2017 at 1:04 PM
    #1
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2016
    Member:
    #2971
    Messages:
    774
    Gender:
    Male
    Georgetown, TX
    Vehicle:
    2016 Texas Edition, 5.7, CM, MGM
    5100's @ 1.57, 295 55 20 nitto ridge grapplers, texas edition wheels (20x9 +50mm), TRD dual exhaust, TRD rear sway bar
    when I had my Tacoma, I installed 2 of these cameras in it. one front facing and one rear facing. since I bought my Tundra, I had been meaning to install the cameras again, but I never got around to it. well, a recent near miss (or near hit :)) encouraged me to get the front facing camera installed.

    I reviewed this camera on the Tacoma world forum, so you can read the complete review of the camera and software there:
    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/dash-cam-genius-dvr-fhd590-installation-and-review.308400/

    when I bought these cameras, they were about $100 a piece. now, they are $35 each. for that price, I highly recommend this camera:
    https://www.amazon.com/Genius-DVR-F...id=1385520745&sr=8-1&keywords=genius+dash+cam


    so, on to the install. in the 3rd gen, the internal fuse box is located above the drivers side kick panel and next to the emergency brake pedal. you do not have to remove the kick panel to access the fuse box, but it is still a pain to work around. it is a tight space and you have to lay on your side/back to reach it. actually replacing fuses would be annoying and would probably require a fuse puller tool.
    lift the tab on the end of the fuse box cover and it will pop off.
    [​IMG]

    on my model, there were several vacant fuse slots. this one happened to be switched with the ignition.
    [​IMG]

    on the fuse box cover, this slot is below the washer fuse.
    [​IMG]

    the tundra uses the same small ATM fuses as the Tacoma. so, I reused the 12-volt accessory outlet and the fuse tap from my Tacoma install.
    [​IMG]

    I wired the fuse tap and a ground to the 12-volt accessory outlet using disconnects.
    [​IMG]

    i inserted the fuse tap into the empty slot. the camera draws about 1.5 amps, so I added a 2 amp fuse. with the fuse tap, the fuse box cover wont be able to be reattached to the fuse box. no real harm though :)
    [​IMG]

    the 10mm bolt holding the fuse box works as a ground.
    [​IMG]

    the accessory outlet is ready for the power cable that came with the camera.
    [​IMG]

    the next step is to route the power cable from the outlet to the camera. I chose to go up through the dash, up the pillar, and across the head liner. the 10mm bolt on the pillar trim can be accessed under the airbag logo cover. this cover can be pried open with a small screw driver. you have to be very careful to not scratch or mar the trim.
    [​IMG]

    pull the pillar trim piece towards the center of the truck until this clip pops out.
    [​IMG]

    then pull the pillar trim piece up to so that the plastic tabs come up and out of the clips in the dash.
    [​IMG]

    these are the clips in the dash where the plastic pillar tabs are inserted into.
    [​IMG]

    this would also be a good time to replace the pillar trim with the one with a grab handle:
    https://www.tundras.com/threads/for-those-with-no-driver-side-interior-grip-handle.4433/#post-65922

    passing the power cable through the dash was a pain. I didn't have any wire coat hangers so I had to make use of some rubber tubing. with the power cable routed through the dash, I inserted it into the accessory outlet.
    [​IMG]

    I bundled up the excess cable and taped any exposed metal from the disconnects and the accessory outlet.
    [​IMG]

    the whole wire bundle tucked behind and above the kick panel and below the fuse box.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I was able to tuck the power wire up the pillar, into the headliner, and down the rear view mirror. the camera hangs just below rear view mirror, but it is not obtrusive.
    yay, it still works after all these years :)
    [​IMG]

    the suction cup and brackets for the camera hide behind the rear view mirror.
    [​IMG]

    on my Tacoma, the included power cable barely reached from the fuse box to the rear window of the truck. on the Tundra, I know the power cable will be too short. I would have to splice into the power cable. easy enough, I guess. however, I am not sure were I would mount a rear camera to. maybe to the rear head rest posts? the rear window is out since it rolls down. I would have to fabricate some sort of bracket. but that's another project.

    thanks for looking :)
     
    AxelsHumanDad, Bob, iHacker and 5 others like this.
  2. Sep 15, 2018 at 6:37 PM
    #2
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    I've been using this post for my own dash cam install. Strangely, after I bought the required fuse taps and fuses (hard-wiring for parking mode using a Vicovation Vico Power Plus), I popped open my fuse box cover to discover that the 2018s (not sure of any others) use ATM-LP fuses and not the ATMs shown above.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] and parallax like this.
  3. Sep 15, 2018 at 7:53 PM
    #3
    blue16

    blue16 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Member:
    #6237
    Messages:
    2,838
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    steve
    Mesa AZ
    Vehicle:
    2016 tundra
    Nice write up. I have been thinking about adding one.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] and parallax like this.
  4. Sep 15, 2018 at 10:55 PM
    #4
    SR5TRDTUNDRA

    SR5TRDTUNDRA El Pickup Azul

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2016
    Member:
    #2519
    Messages:
    10,351
    Gender:
    Male
    Alberta, Canada
    Vehicle:
    Blue 2015 Tundra SR5 Trd off road crewmax 4x4
    Awesome job! :thumbsup:
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  5. Sep 16, 2018 at 1:00 AM
    #5
    parallax

    parallax Professional Zamboni stunt driver

    Joined:
    May 27, 2018
    Member:
    #15644
    Messages:
    83
    Oregon
    Vehicle:
    2018 White Tundra Crewmax SR5 5.7 TRD 4x4
    Dash camera
    Thank you for taking the time to do this,, alot of good info..
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  6. Sep 17, 2018 at 11:33 AM
    #6
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    Hardwire installation completed this weekend. I'll take pics and post in the near future.
     
    Netmonkey [OP] likes this.
  7. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:27 AM
    #7
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    Hi all. As promised, I took pictures of my dash cam hardwire install and will do my best to describe each step.

    First, the interior fuse box on my 2018 SR5 is not the same as the OP's. As stated previously, mine uses ATM-LP fuses and not the ATMs as shown above.


     
  8. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:34 AM
    #8
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    Also, I am fortunate enough to have plenty of open slots to use.

    My dash cam is a Viofo A119 V2. I chose to get it with the GPS mount and circular polarizing filter (CPL). The GPS mount is sticky-mounted (not suction mounted) to the windshield just left of the rearview mirror where I have full access to buttons and it doesn't interfere with mirror movement or the light sensor on the back of the mirror.

    The wiring goes to the GPS mount. The dash cam itself can easily disconnect from the GPS mount so there is no need to disconnect anything when I decide to remove the camera (for example, to download any recordings onto my computer inside).

     
  9. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:39 AM
    #9
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    I tucked the wiring from the GPS above the into the headliner and ran it over to the front left pillar.


    Then, instead of taking the pillar cover off, I just tucked the wiring into the top of the pillar cover and over to the door gasket.

     
  10. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:41 AM
    #10
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    Then, out the other side and down the door gasket (which very easily and very securely holds the wiring).


    From there, it simply goes under the dash to the fuse box.

     
  11. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:46 AM
    #11
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    To provide power control, I am using a Vicovation Vico Power Plus. I could have picked up the standard hardwiring kit for the Viofo dash cam, but the VPP allows me to set all of the cutoff parameters, such as when the battery voltage gets to a certain point, when temperatures get to a certain high/low, or after a certain amount of time. It also has a manual bypass so I can turn it on or off. So, for example, when I'm at home and don't need to have parking mode enabled, I just flip the switch on the VPP and the dash cam shuts off when the engine is turned off.

    I placed the VPP at my right by my right leg where I can see it easily and access the bypass switch without any trouble. It is also nicely out of the way.


     
  12. Sep 22, 2018 at 9:54 AM
    #12
    Freak Show

    Freak Show New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Member:
    #19134
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Wayne
    Vehicle:
    2018 Silver Sky Metallic 5.7L SR5 4x4 TRD Double Cab
    Since the VPP is a "smart" sensor, with the ability to bypass constant power mode, I needed two fuses: one for constant power, and one for acc power only, so the VPP could identify when it was receiving power form the battery directly and when it was receiving power from the acc fuse. As stated earlier, I have several open fuse slots, so this was easy. I picked up two ATM-LP fuse taps, and ran them into two open fuse slots (one contant power, and one acc power only). My biggest challenge through this install was trying to find low-amp ATM-LP fuses. I finally settled on 7.5 amp fuses since the VPP comes with in-line 2 amp fuses, which should blow first if there's a problem.

    The VPP has three connections to the vehicle; one battery power line, one acc power line, and one ground. I verified a good ground with the bolt to the fuse box and then made all my connections, grounding to the fuse box bolt as the OP had done.

    The VPP also has a connection to the dash cam, via a female 12V connector. Since the Viofo comes with a male 12V connector to plug into available 12V outlets, the connection was an easy deal. I then taped up all the excess cable, taped the male and female 12V connections together, and tucked the connection up under the dash. Easy peasy!

     
  13. Nov 2, 2018 at 6:57 AM
    #13
    wwolvverine

    wwolvverine New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2018
    Member:
    #18644
    Messages:
    40
    Gender:
    Male
    2018 Tundra 1794
    OBD cables are available now, so you don't have to do the add a fuse thing to fuse box. Yes it is safe to plug into OBD.
     
    JoshuaA likes this.
  14. Nov 2, 2018 at 7:48 AM
    #14
    Netmonkey

    Netmonkey [OP] Don't be a Dumbass

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2016
    Member:
    #2971
    Messages:
    774
    Gender:
    Male
    Georgetown, TX
    Vehicle:
    2016 Texas Edition, 5.7, CM, MGM
    5100's @ 1.57, 295 55 20 nitto ridge grapplers, texas edition wheels (20x9 +50mm), TRD dual exhaust, TRD rear sway bar
    what is the max amp draw that you can put on the OBD port?
     
  15. Nov 2, 2018 at 8:54 AM
    #15
    TundraLuv

    TundraLuv New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Member:
    #15870
    Messages:
    184
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Kent
    IA
    Vehicle:
    2018 Midnight Black Metallic Limited Crewmax
    How would that even work? Are you splicing the OBD wires? Posi-tap? I've got a splitter for the OBD.
     
  16. Nov 2, 2018 at 5:07 PM
    #16
    wwolvverine

    wwolvverine New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2018
    Member:
    #18644
    Messages:
    40
    Gender:
    Male
    2018 Tundra 1794
    Don't know the amp draw of OBD, you just buy the OBD adapter cable and plug it in, no splicing. OBD goes thru fuse box first so no harm to computer. I have seen OBD cables come with VanTrue Dash Cams free, a lot of Uber and Lyft drivers use them.
     

Products Discussed in

To Top