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Brakes!

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014+)' started by Pupule Mike, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. Feb 10, 2020 at 10:17 AM
    #1
    Pupule Mike

    Pupule Mike [OP] New Member

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    Last month I was at the dealership, they told me I need brakes on all four corners, the quote was $350.00 per axle, so $700.00 for the whole truck, and maybe rotors if needed. Does this sound about right? Rotors were $175.00 ea.

    I spoke with an independent mechanic that specializes on Toyotas, he told the average Tundra usually wears out pads at 30K. Does this sound right? My Tundra has 74K on it now.
     
  2. Feb 10, 2020 at 10:21 AM
    #2
    BlueDream

    BlueDream New Member

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    Typical dealership rippoff.
     
    Tundyfundy and Pupule Mike [OP] like this.
  3. Feb 10, 2020 at 10:37 AM
    #3
    IBJC

    IBJC New Member

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    You can do it yourself for a third of that If you're mechanically inclined
     
    Tundyfundy and AlbertaBeef like this.
  4. Feb 10, 2020 at 10:41 AM
    #4
    TundraMcGov.

    TundraMcGov. Your friend. Your foe. Not yo Ho.

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    NO!!!
     
    Tundyfundy likes this.
  5. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:08 AM
    #5
    Sumo91

    Sumo91 New Member

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    If you are mechanically inclined at all I would suggest changing them yourself. I changed mine recently. $112 for the front and rear pads from the dealership, and the part that took the longest was removing and installing the wheels. The front pads only need some metal spring clips removed and 2 pins pulled out. Super easy
     
  6. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:11 AM
    #6
    Chucho

    Chucho New Member

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    Salem, OR
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    5100's all around. 275/70 DuraTrac
    I'm going on 80K miles and am still on original pads from the factory.
    I bought my truck new and everything is still good.
     
    Sumo91 likes this.
  7. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:18 AM
    #7
    RickC

    RickC NOT a new member

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    SCS Wheels, Line-X
    You can do them including rotors for about 100.00 a corner. I buy my parts from conicelli because they discount them and have never had an issue. 175.00 for the rotor is ridiculous. Here is a link to the parts and prices: https://parts.conicellitoyotaofcons...a--limited--5-7l-v8-flex/brakes--front-brakes

    If your truck doesn't vibrate or pulsate when braking, you more than likely don't need rotors which means only the pads need replacing. And if that is the case, then what Sumo91 said is exactly right. You don't even have to pull the caliper to replace the pads.

    Check out youtube but if you know which end of the wrench to hold, then you can replace the pads yourself. Not difficult at all.
     
    Tundra_361 and Sumo91 like this.
  8. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:36 AM
    #8
    gdiep

    gdiep New Member

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    If the OP is on the original rotors and pads at 74k, then he's done pretty well. My pads were toast at 47k and the rotors were getting pretty thin. I replaced my rotors and pads with a powerstop kit for about $400 all in. The job isn't too difficult unless the calipers are rusted on. Then you have to break out the heat. Doable DIY.
     
  9. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:41 AM
    #9
    Johnsonman

    Johnsonman New Member

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    LED headlamps/fogs; interior footlamps.
    I only find stealerships useful for Warranty work and OEM parts that I want, otherwise..... I DIM or find a mechanic I trust....
     
    AlbertaBeef likes this.
  10. Feb 10, 2020 at 12:48 PM
    #10
    Joe333x

    Joe333x New Member

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    Interesting, I've never replaced pads without taking the caliper off but I've also never replaced pads on a Tundra.
     
    Tundyfundy likes this.
  11. Feb 10, 2020 at 12:54 PM
    #11
    omgboost

    omgboost The Accountant

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    Watch YouTube videos. I changed all rotors to OE rotors and trd brake pads for about $500 in parts, shipped. Changed them all myself in a day, I’d say about 4 hours, taking my time and running into a small issue with one of the rear rotors and parking brake. After that was resolved, the other side was easy peasy.
     
  12. Feb 10, 2020 at 5:36 PM
    #12
    Crunch527

    Crunch527 Brute Force and Ignorance

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    Just did pads and rotors at 74K. Never had any vehicle brakes last that long. I tow too.
     
  13. Feb 10, 2020 at 6:15 PM
    #13
    RickC

    RickC NOT a new member

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    focal and Joe333x like this.
  14. Feb 10, 2020 at 7:02 PM
    #14
    AKJ78

    AKJ78 New Member

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    3/1.5 lift. TRD sway bar. Bakflip V1 cover. Fuel wheels w/BFG A/T.
    8880D3EB-EB93-427A-AF75-7E6AEF41B809.jpg

    This setup was $154 when I purchased 2 months ago. Hard to tell if they’re better than stock since stock were in bad shape when I replaced them. I will say braking is excellent. No complaints after 1500 miles so far. Took about 3 hours to do all 4. Very easy compared to other vehicles I’ve worked on.
     
  15. Feb 10, 2020 at 7:35 PM
    #15
    Tundra234

    Tundra234 New Member

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    I just did front and rear StopTech Sport slotted rotors (cryo treated for the front) and PosiQuiet ceramic pads. 600 miles so far and I'm happy with them. I ran Powerstops prior. No more vibrations.
     
    Tundyfundy likes this.
  16. Feb 10, 2020 at 8:37 PM
    #16
    Joe333x

    Joe333x New Member

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    Thanks for the video. Personally I think I'd just take the caliper off though. That looks like a great way to mar the rotors, you can see marks he left on them in that video. What I do is use large C clamp pliers to compress the old pads down with the caliper off. Plus that what I can apply some WD40 to the caliper bolts since I had one seize on in a car before due to the amount of salt corrosion we have here.
     
  17. Feb 10, 2020 at 9:07 PM
    #17
    ski

    ski New Member

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    Interesting. Conicelli is in the next town over from me. Didnt know they had an online parts store.
     
    RickC likes this.
  18. Feb 12, 2020 at 5:34 PM
    #18
    RickC

    RickC NOT a new member

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    Yep, been buying my 4runner parts from them for years and I just replaced the brakes on all 4 corners including rotors on my Camry just a few weeks ago. Great bunch to deal with regarding parts.
     
  19. Feb 12, 2020 at 5:38 PM
    #19
    RickC

    RickC NOT a new member

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    I agree. I have never done it this way and thought the same thing when I watched it. I was just showing that it can be done and probably with the right tools instead of using a screw driver, one could push the pistons back in without damaging the rotor. I have always removed them and used c clamps and one of the old brake pads.
     
    Joe333x likes this.
  20. Feb 12, 2020 at 7:41 PM
    #20
    kevine0001

    kevine0001 New Member

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    I'd also say even if you're NOT mechanically inclined, watch a youtube video and do it yourself. Get good pads, and if necessary, good rotors. Or jack it up on stands, take all four rotors to get them turned (about $10/rotor) and install new pads yourself. It's really easy. For basic pads, probably $75/pair (per axle). You can get really good pads for probably $100+ per axle. So under $250 and you're done. New rotors are probably $150 per axle. But you'd still save money.
     
  21. Feb 12, 2020 at 8:01 PM
    #21
    Winning8

    Winning8 New Member

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    I don't like turning rotors, it's easier to warp rotors after turning. I will do pad and rotor at the same time. it's a cheap insurance. You never know when you need to haul big load, and that's when that turn rotors get warp.
     
  22. Feb 13, 2020 at 8:15 AM
    #22
    kevine0001

    kevine0001 New Member

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    Winning, I agree that turning increases chances of warping since you are technically making the rotor thinner by removing a layer. But warping sometimes is due to pads that have uneven patches of friction material (cheap pads) that causes warping.

    I don't haul with my truck. It's basically for hunting and camping so I don't have concerns of pulling a heavy load, etc. Thus turning a rotor once for my type of driving I don't believe runs that much risk. However, I typically won't turn a rotor more than once before tossing. After that, then the risk of warping increases significantly.
     
  23. Feb 13, 2020 at 10:27 AM
    #23
    jdg1982

    jdg1982 New Member

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    I just bought rotors for all four corners and pads from Roman at Cool Springs Toyota for I around $472 shipped to me. My dealership tried to quote me almost $900, then tried to tell me it was because I truck is lifted... my Tundra is not lifted at all.
     
  24. Feb 13, 2020 at 1:28 PM
    #24
    Winning8

    Winning8 New Member

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    That’s not bad for brake job only 900 when parts almost 500 with beers... BMW is close to 2k.
     
  25. Feb 13, 2020 at 6:59 PM
    #25
    omgboost

    omgboost The Accountant

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    Having both a BMW and Toyota, BMW parts seem to be a bit cheaper and depending on who you order from, you get free shipping and lifetime warranty.
     

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