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Brake issue

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by 270Fan, Aug 8, 2020.

  1. Aug 8, 2020 at 2:48 PM
    #1
    270Fan

    270Fan [OP] New Member

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    2004 Silver Tundra 4x4 DC
    Today I took my Tundra DC up to Frazier mountain - it's 8k elevation at the top. Long, winding, rocky road coming down. I was riding the brakes trying to stay out of some ruts. Truck was nearly empty except for the 4 fat guys riding in it.

    By the time I got to the bottom of the mountain my pedal was going to the floor with virtually no resistance. I had downshifted it into Low and was able to get the truck stopped by using the parking brake. Brakes smelled like they were burning. After letting the truck sit for awhile the pedal came back. By the time I was on the highway (about a mile later I had a firm pedal).

    The brake fluid looks dirty. My suspicion is that I boiled the fluid. Guy I bought the truck from a month ago gave me his file of receipts of all work done which included a brake job about 8,000 miles ago. Anything else to consider?

    I was planning to do a fluid flush on it last week but injured my elbow and I'm not able to wrench on it. Plan to take it into a shop but don't want to get boned on the deal. Any insights are appreciated.
     
  2. Aug 8, 2020 at 3:07 PM
    #2
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Hand Protectors
    Glad you made it safely. Couple of things:

    1)Your calipers may be old and nasty.

    2) Your brake fluid change is based on age and not miles as it attracts water.

    3) You could very well have boiled your fluid. DOT3 is our spec and is widely used. I suggest using Bosch 5.1 as it is El Fluido Suprémõ.

    4) Our original brake lines are old and nasty and soften with heat. Suggest Stainless Braided hoses.

    5) Your pads/shoes may be el cheapos.

    Lots of factors listed here, but I can speak from experience on all these above items. You can see all the pics on my build page 4 or 5? when I achieved Brake Nirvana.

    Specs on Brake Fluid Boiling Points. Do NOT USE DOT5(five). You DO want DOT5.1(five point one). Bosch!

    upload_2020-8-8_18-2-7.jpg

    upload_2020-8-8_18-7-28.jpg
     
    bassman417, 270Fan [OP] and N84434 like this.
  3. Aug 8, 2020 at 3:13 PM
    #3
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    NY
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    I just drove down mt Washington in nh today. It goes from 6600 ft down to about 1600 ft. Had to ride my brakes too cause the person in front kept hitting theirs and wouldn’t pull over to let cars by. At the bottom mine worked, but barely and it was hard to stop. I got out and tested them and they were all 500-600F. I replaced mine with dot 5 already so I think my fluid is good, but I’m going to replace my pads when I get home.

    Only other thing I’m worried is that I over heated and damaged a wheel bearing. But I drove for awhile to cool them and it all seems ok.

    If I were you, I’d inspect the pads and flush the fluid.
     
    270Fan [OP] likes this.
  4. Aug 8, 2020 at 4:16 PM
    #4
    RR60

    RR60 New Member

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    2003 SR5 Tundra long bed
    Hi,

    I recently spent some time looking and could not find any stainless hoses for the rear except for a 2wd model.
    Any suggestions
    Thanks
     
  5. Aug 8, 2020 at 4:43 PM
    #5
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Hand Protectors
    Sure thing. Not sure if the prices changed as these are the ones I ordered back in January.



    upload_2020-8-8_19-42-10.jpg

    upload_2020-8-8_19-42-54.jpg
     
    270Fan [OP] and YardBird like this.
  6. Aug 8, 2020 at 6:34 PM
    #6
    evilrb

    evilrb New Member

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  7. Aug 8, 2020 at 7:05 PM
    #7
    270Fan

    270Fan [OP] New Member

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    2004 Silver Tundra 4x4 DC
    Thanks a million, I appreciate it. Talked to the guy I bought the truck from, he said he never flushed the brakes just did brake jobs. I'm going to take it into a shop and have them do a brake fluid flush and see if they notice anything that causes them concern. On Thursday I'm leaving for 2 weeks for an archery hunt and I need to rest my elbow as much as possible. When I get back I will swap parts - may do the full brake upgrade. Really appreciate your input.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2020 at 6:10 AM
    #8
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    ‘Somewhere’... a State of Mind
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    Hand Protectors
    Sure thing. When I started my journey on the brakes I did an initial flush and saw black gunk in the old fluid. I waited a week and did another flush and the same. I started reading some and found these calipers need rebuilding after so many years. I decided to just buy new ones which were slightly larger.

    Glad I did because rebuilding the old ones would have been futile. They were nasty.

    Found info on the Bosch Fluid and then next I said I may as well rebuild the rear cylinders and do the stainless hoses. I went down a good rabbit hole on this one.

    Circling back to my point, I ended up flushing the system about 4 times in total. Each time junk was still coming out albeit a little less until the final one. Thats when I put in the 5.1 fluid. It costs more so did not want to sacrifice it. Before putting on any new calipers on I’d really flush everything out of the system a few times. The load sensing brake valve traps crud, too.

    Sounds like you having the garage do a flush now is a good start. You can do another once you get well before installing the new components.
     
    270Fan [OP] likes this.
  9. Aug 9, 2020 at 8:25 PM
    #9
    fighthedude

    fighthedude New Member

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    Where you headed? Good luck
     
    270Fan [OP] likes this.
  10. Aug 10, 2020 at 8:05 PM
    #10
    270Fan

    270Fan [OP] New Member

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    2004 Silver Tundra 4x4 DC
    Update - took truck into the shop to get the brakes flushed. They said the fluid was terrible and the previous brake job was done with cheap brake pads so I held my nose and paid them to do a brake job. I looked at the pads and they were completely glazed and had a couple cracks. I was planning to do all this stuff myself when I returned from vacation so it stings a little but at least it's done and I have a good pedal.

    The shop I went to has a reputation for doing excellent work but also "finding" other things that need to be done. They are not cheap and I won't be going back. I was going to get them to do my timing belt and water pump (that's above my pay grade) but they quoted me $424.48 to replace my spark plugs, $897.28 to replace my rack & pinion (it's got a small leak), $74.00 for "A/C filter replacement" and $166.95 for coolant exchange. If anybody knows of a good shop near the San Fernando Valley where I can get the timing belt and related done I'd love to hear of them.

    Thanks to all for the insights, I appreciate it. Now it's off to NorCal for archery season.
     
  11. Aug 10, 2020 at 8:12 PM
    #11
    8MINT8

    8MINT8 #NotBetty

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    You can adjust the rear prop valve for more pressure or bias. It helps the front not do most of the stopping power.
     
  12. Aug 10, 2020 at 8:41 PM
    #12
    fighthedude

    fighthedude New Member

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    Good luck. You headed to B zone?
     
  13. Aug 10, 2020 at 10:18 PM
    #13
    270Fan

    270Fan [OP] New Member

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    Heading to A-20. Opener is Saturday.
     

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