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Adjusting rear drums.

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Pucks18, Feb 21, 2020.

  1. Feb 21, 2020 at 10:34 AM
    #1
    Pucks18

    Pucks18 [OP] Panic mode

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    Got a new truck, dont know if my rear drums are working at all. I'm assuming most likely not cause when i set my parking brake, it doesnt do anything at all. ( cable tightens but doesnt hold truck at all). So do i just spin the adjuster sprocket untill my rear wheels cant spin anymore (locked up, as my wheels will be jacked up off the ground). Then once they are locked up, un tighten it 2-3 clicks? Or should i adjust them to where i feel slightly more drag on the tire then just stop there? Thanks. I have no experience with adjusting drums.
     
  2. Feb 21, 2020 at 12:54 PM
    #2
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol The "Mangler"

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    Too many
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  3. Feb 21, 2020 at 1:13 PM
    #3
    PCJ

    PCJ New Member

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    The brake shoes should self adjust everytime that you use the parking brake so something is wrong. The first thing you need to do is remove the drums and check everything.
     
  4. Feb 21, 2020 at 1:55 PM
    #4
    Pucks18

    Pucks18 [OP] Panic mode

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    @PCJ Yea unfort my parking brake doesnt work, and im not too confident in removing my shoes, are u sure just cant adjust them without checking? Lol
     
  5. Feb 21, 2020 at 2:06 PM
    #5
    BubbaW

    BubbaW Saw it right off

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    You got folks here that can assist and then there's youtube !

    BigBoyBritches.jpg
     
  6. Feb 21, 2020 at 3:38 PM
    #6
    Bubbadog

    Bubbadog New Member

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    Maybe you can just jack up the rear end and adjust the rears till you feel a slight drag on the drums.

    You can take up any parking brake cable slack by adjusting the turnbuckle located inside of the frame rail just below the driver's door.
     
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  7. Feb 21, 2020 at 3:49 PM
    #7
    PCJ

    PCJ New Member

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    Yes, but how do you know that there are no broken springs, missing/broken parts, damaged brake shoes or misassembly by the previous owner.
     
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  8. Feb 22, 2020 at 1:53 AM
    #8
    Aerindel

    Aerindel New Member

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    Your rear brakes are self adjusting. The sprocket is just intended to back them off to remove the drums if the shoes have worn grooves into them and won't slide off. Although you can carefully manually adjust them this is not particularly easy to do, and should not ever be needed.

    However...

    This only works if your parking brake is properly adjusted so that there is no slack in the system. You must also make sure that the lever on your rear axle where the second cable comes off the primary is not rusted stuck, and that the bellcrank levers on the back of each brake drum are likewise not seized.

    It is a good idea to remove your rear drums and at least look at the mechanism. One poster here found that the short internal cables where not routed correctly on his truck for example. Removing your drums is not hard to do. You do not have to remove the shoes etc unless warn out or broken, rusted, etc.

    After checking nothing is rusted in place or missing etc, tighten the turnbuckle under the drivers side until the there is no slack at the bell cranks. The cable should feel tight to the touch but not hard (still able to be pushed up or down)

    Then apply the parking brake several times, pushing it as far in as possible. You should be able to hear a 'click' from the rear brake drums each time the self adjuster activates. Keep doing this until no further clicking sound can be heard. A properly adjusted parking brake will bottom out from excessive force before it bottoms out from lack of travel

    Rear brakes out of adjustment will effect your entire braking system as the front and rear brakes share hydraulic circuits so a rear brake out of adjustment will result in more pedal travel and a soft brake feeling in general.

    This system actually works very well when properly set up but many people do not understand it or fail to understand how important the parking brake is to the entire system working properly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2020
  9. Feb 22, 2020 at 5:32 AM
    #9
    Pucks18

    Pucks18 [OP] Panic mode

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    @Aerindel thank you. Yes it appears to me the actuator on the back of the wheel (the part the cable pulls) is seized
     
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  10. Feb 22, 2020 at 7:15 AM
    #10
    BubbaW

    BubbaW Saw it right off

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    @Pucks18 I would definitely consider jacking one side up with assistance if need be and remove the drum, throw up some good pics of the mechanisms and also of actuator on the back of the wheel.
    There are a number of very competent brake folks here as you well know....present company excluded !
     
  11. Feb 22, 2020 at 7:19 AM
    #11
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Total Rear drum rebuild at this age. Bite the bullet and getter dun. Its amazing how much better my truck brakes and the action on the parking lever is like new. I got to thinking the other day how important the parking/emergency really is as its a back up to failed hydraulics. My front brake hose was deteriorating and could have ruptured at any time and if there was no parking brake as back up then SOL. Here is the process:

    1) Dismantle drums.

    2) Rebuild or buy new cylinders.

    3) Install new shoes per FSM.

    4) Grease up all the spots per FSM and wire brush/paint any rust while in there. Replace/repair your frozen bellcrank lever.

    5) Put back everything per FSM.

    6) NOW you are ready to start adjusting cables per FSM starting in the rear cable area and then working your way up to the turnbuckle adjust (most likely) and eventually the foot brake area (if needed but probs not).

    That is my trial and error big picture process not described in the FSM which is only modular in their instructions. Basically, start at the drums and work your way out horizontally on the cable and then forward towards the turnbuckle . Make sure each adjustment at each module is proper before moving on in the process because you’ll never get it right!

    upload_2020-2-22_10-10-51.jpg

    upload_2020-2-22_10-11-13.jpg
     
  12. Feb 27, 2020 at 6:59 PM
    #12
    tmac58star

    tmac58star New Member

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    Rear drum brakes are a real treat to rebuild by yourself...NOT. Take photos of what you find after you pull the wheels and drums off. Do one side at a time so you have a frame of reference to look at on the other wheel. You will get dirty...wear old clothes, use plenty of Brak-Kleen and work in a spot where you can make a mess...it's messy work the first time around.
     
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  13. Feb 27, 2020 at 10:48 PM
    #13
    PCJ

    PCJ New Member

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    Drum brakes are actually pretty easy to work on but you want either a factory service manual that you know how to read and understand or someone who knows what they are doing help you and teach you.

    You don't want to rely on doing one side at a time to guide you because I have taken drum brakes apart with the shoe position mixed up, springs put on wrong, self adjusters put on the wrong side, etc. so you can't count on following what you see for reassembly.

    Also, having the proper brake tools to remove and install the springs is a big help.
     
  14. Feb 28, 2020 at 6:00 AM
    #14
    foxtrapper

    foxtrapper New Member

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    With a parking brake simply not working, rust on the parking brake mechanism is the first suspect.

    If the lever/pedal/shaft moves all the way with no action or resistance, a broken piece or wildly off adjustment are likely suspects, in that order.

    Lifting the entire rear, and taking the drums off both sides for visual reference (doing one side, while looking at the other to see where the bits and bobs go) was and still is a good practice. Though the handy smart phone camera and the internet has rendered it less important. All assume the visual is indeed assembled correctly.

    Be cautious with cheap aftermarket hardware kits. In order for the brakes to self adjust correctly some dimensions must be correct. Not all aftermarket kits have the right dimensions on the self adjuster parts. OEM Toyota is not cheap, but will have the right dimensions.

    To do drum brakes you really want the right tools. Trying to remove and install the springs with screwdrivers and pliers is.... frustrating, as well time consuming.

    If you open it up and find nothing looks worn, suspect the load adjuster valve under the bed of being slushed and blinding fluid flow to the rear brakes. It can be disassembled and cleaned, but simply replacing it is easier.
     
  15. Mar 13, 2021 at 7:06 AM
    #15
    BobTTundra

    BobTTundra New Member

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    I just did my rear brakes and it went swimmingly easy thanks to 'How To Automotive' video (below). I have done many drum brake services in the past and always dread it. Lots of fiddly parts, springs that are very tight and hard to get to release, etc. With the little tips in the video it was enjoyable and easy.

    My truck with 133k miles had never had the rear brakes done. The shoes wear eccentrically and at their most worn were just over half way down. I replaced them based on age - I have found many pads of this age with cracks or crumbling apart, I don't think chunks of pad material between the pad and drum would be a good thing. Also older shoes/pads are glazed and lose their braking effectiveness. $90 for OEM shoes, good for another 15 years!

    I also had a local brake shop turn the drums. They were glazed and grooved, now they look brand new.

    https://youtu.be/6wjT8Iz43zk
     
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  16. Mar 13, 2021 at 7:59 AM
    #16
    jimf909

    jimf909 Battery almost dead...

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    Do Tundra rear brakes also adjust when applying the brakes (abruptly) while in driving in reverse? I've had experience with older domestic and VW cars that do this.
     
  17. Mar 13, 2021 at 8:00 AM
    #17
    BobTTundra

    BobTTundra New Member

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    They adjust when applying the parking brake
     
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  18. Mar 13, 2021 at 8:04 AM
    #18
    FrenchToasty

    FrenchToasty Desert rat

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    They’re SUPPOSED to, doesn’t always happen in the real world, recommend to adjust the rears every 5k or so
     
  19. Mar 13, 2021 at 8:40 AM
    #19
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Main thing is follow FSM in post #11.

    Also, since learning more in trial and error from another member here I discovered the Equalizer and Bushings are also a pivot point. Mine (Equalizer) was frozen. The bushings still pivoted. There are two pivots on this lever and one worked and the other ‘Equalizer’ was locked up, I wrongly assumed by design.

    A member posted about theirs when they broke their Bolt to the assembly and further discovery shows Plastic Bushings as guides inside. I went out and worked mine by Hand with penetrant an 3in1 Oil. Removed the bolt on the other lever and discovered worn out Plastic Bushings which canted the lever ever so slightly to throw off the Mojo.

    Recco you inspect and take measures here as it took my PB experience to the next level. Now both sides of the rear brakes ‘Equalize’ in ‘Adjustment’ rather than just the pass side pulling tight ignoring the driver side due to faulty bushings and seized lever. This is not in FSM. Not my truck or pic but you can see here as example. Order two new Bushings and replaced along with plenty of lube.

    upload_2021-3-13_11-39-52.jpg
     
  20. Mar 13, 2021 at 9:10 AM
    #20
    jimf909

    jimf909 Battery almost dead...

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    Thank for confirming this and nice write up above.

    I'm not sure if this internet "wisdom" is correct but here's a mention of the different adjustment systems. I was recalling the system described in the second paragraph.

    "If the starwheel is located just under the wheel cylinder, the auto adjustment is done by the parking brake. This closer to the top of the backing plate.

    If the starwheel is located at the base of the brakes and acts as the hinge point for the shoes, then the adjustment is done by backing up. Although the parking brake usually activates this action as well.
    "
     
  21. Mar 13, 2021 at 9:15 AM
    #21
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    According to FSM the PB is the ‘Automatic Adjustment Mechanism’.


    Thinking out loud, a good forceful stop while in Reverse might reset the Shoe Mojo a bit.
     
  22. Mar 13, 2021 at 10:47 AM
    #22
    jimf909

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    It sounds like the PB method is standard for many Asian cars. I grew up in the flat midwest where everyone drove domestic cars and 90% of those Chevy/Ford drivers may never have used the parking brake in the car's lifetime (I sure don't recall my mom or dad using it). The adjustment by braking in reverse method was a good design for those drivers.
     
  23. Mar 14, 2021 at 7:05 AM
    #23
    pop's

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  24. May 27, 2021 at 8:21 PM
    #24
    shootemintheface

    shootemintheface New Member

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    Is the equalizer suppose to pivot at one or two points?
     
  25. May 27, 2021 at 9:12 PM
    #25
    joseph_womack

    joseph_womack Don't Lose Sight

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    is this info only specific to 1st gens?
     
  26. May 27, 2021 at 10:17 PM
    #26
    assassin10000

    assassin10000 New Member

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    Nope. My 1st gen Tacoma is the same adjustment wise. Although it has a handle instead of pedal, as it is manual trans.

    Drum brakes are very very very similar.
     
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  27. May 28, 2021 at 6:03 AM
    #27
    Professional Hand Model

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    Yes 2 Points. One of my 2 points was locked keeping the Parking Brake from proper reset. The picture above is a double hinged mechanism. Didn’t realize the one point was a hinge as it looks welded/solid. Check your bushings for wear as those help keep the Equalizer Arm in line.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2021
  28. May 28, 2021 at 6:07 AM
    #28
    Professional Hand Model

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  29. May 28, 2021 at 7:18 PM
    #29
    lc69hunter

    lc69hunter New Member

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    This is a great thread. I have done the drum brakes on my FJ-40 and FJ-55 for years, but this is a good guide on the differences.
     
  30. May 28, 2021 at 8:45 PM
    #30
    shootemintheface

    shootemintheface New Member

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    This is what mine looks like. Are you saying that where the red arrow is pointing. That pivot point is suppose to be free moving? It's rusted frozen. I can feel the rubber inserts/guides that were referenced. If you look farther down in the pictures the Dorman replacement you can see lots of room between the gold mounting bolt and the bracket. Guess Dorman assumes you can reuse them... Mine still rotates freely at the silver part.

    1.jpg

    Here is the Dorman cable that I got. It did not come with the rubber bushings that are in the Toyota drawings. If you pretend the flash light is the rear axle and pivoted to the left towards the driver side. Wouldn't actually give slack to the rear driver wheel? It seems there is very little adjust for the driver side.
    3.jpg

    IMG_20210528_212041032.jpg IMG_20210528_212208208.jpg

    A video of someone's non rusted/frozen functioning equalizer would help.
     
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