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4.6 Towing with no Tow Package

Discussion in 'Towing & Hauling' started by hudrock, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Nov 4, 2018 at 12:20 PM
    #1
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    Never towed a trailer so wanted to pick the brains of the smart guys on here. I searched around here a bit and found some answers and some more questions, I love these forums but sometimes to much infomation lol. I have a pretty basic 2018 4.6L Crewmax, no tow packing but has the standard tow hitch receiver with 4/7 pin connector and 3.91 gears.

    It’s just the me, the wife and a dog and have no wants/desire for a big trailer but would I have any issues towing a small camper as is? Looking at max weight of like 1500 -3000 lbs - like a Jayco Hummingbird or Little guy Trailer. I’m assuming It can since my model is rated for like 6,700 lbs but I know the devil is in the details. It could be my own ignorance but I didn’t think I would need a "tow package" for a little type travel trailer as its more for more for heavy duty towing with HD oil & transmission cooling - big trailers and boats, etc.. One thing I’m not certain on is the braking. Can the Tundra handle a little trailer as it or would that be one of the things I’m missing with out the tow package? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Nov 4, 2018 at 12:44 PM
    #2
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ I drink…and I know things. Staff Member

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    A metric buttload
    First find out if the camper you want to purchase has a braking axle.

    If yes:

    Brake controller, from the aftermarket world is best.

    Since you don’t have tow haul mode, you just became the computer. Shift into S mode and do the manual shifting yourself. I’m sure you will find yourself in 3-5 most days at freeway speeds depending on where you travel.

    Enjoy your new camper, truck, and travels.
     
  3. Nov 4, 2018 at 8:45 PM
    #3
    Trd307

    Trd307 New Member

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    Hook on to it and see what happens! If it says max is 6700 don't go over that. 3k pounds shouldn't bother your truck. Just make sure all your lights work and don't do major grades without practice!
     
  4. Nov 16, 2018 at 8:40 PM
    #4
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    Makes sense about the manual shifting. I was looking at something like the Tekonsha for the brake controller https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000P17NXQ
    Any opinions on tow hitches?
     
  5. Jan 9, 2019 at 2:57 PM
    #5
    Tracy Perry

    Tracy Perry New Member

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    The P-3 is one of the better controllers. I forgot to take mine out of the 4Runner we recently traded in on the Tundra and am kind of kicking myself in the butt for forgetting due to the issues that people are apparently having with the integrated controller.
     
  6. Apr 10, 2019 at 8:22 PM
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    Christmas

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    Question: Do you think if towing with 4.6 w/o tow package. A transmission cooler is good idea? I found some with thermostats to regulate temperature.
     
  7. Apr 11, 2019 at 5:23 AM
    #7
    JohnLakeman

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    With my 4.6L, I would expect no harm from occasional short-range, short duration local towing without a transmission cooler. I am thinking of adding a trailer brake controller regardless of duration just for the safety considerations.

    If you're planning to tow longer distances and durations at rated loads, I suspect you would be happier with a 5.7L, but I would definitely add a cooler to help the transmission as much as possible.
     
  8. Apr 11, 2019 at 8:24 PM
    #8
    salmonator

    salmonator New Member

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    Yep. Regardless 5.7 or 4.6, a trans cooler if towing decent weights is good idea.

    The 4.6 transmission isn’t immune to heat anymore than the 5.7 trans.
     
  9. Apr 11, 2019 at 8:38 PM
    #9
    Ironsights

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  10. Apr 11, 2019 at 8:51 PM
    #10
    KLLVMDCL

    KLLVMDCL New Member

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    the 4.6 is no slouch, if it makes you feel better i towed 1k with a 4 cyl Camry from CA to TX. 3k shouldnt be an issue for the 4.6, but as others have suggested a trailer brake is a good idea to avoid extra strain on the brakes. a tranny cooler would be ideal if you plan on towing up hill for hours at a time or long distances. im not a towing expert but its simple physics.
     
  11. Apr 11, 2019 at 9:47 PM
    #11
    salmonator

    salmonator New Member

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    Spent a month in Europe a couple summers ago. Rented an RV and drove it around to “camping” parks all over. Was shocked at the tow vehicles I saw. Like a BMW 323 coupe towing a trailer with two horses. Small 4 cyl econoboxes towing travel trailers. Common.

    The 4.6 is great. Don’t exceed the stated limits by a bunch, have working trailer brakes. And a trans cooler is a really good idea. And enjoy it.
     
  12. Jun 21, 2020 at 9:23 AM
    #12
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    Reviving an old thread here but I have been kicking around the idea of selling my current 4.6 Crewmax and grabbing a used 5.7 for towing package however due to the great resale value of Tundras and the great deal I received on current truck I'm having a hard time justifying the cost's. All that being said I'm planning on just upgrading my current truck. It's rated at 6,700ibs towing/1600lbs payload and I feel it should be plenty capable to handle a 20ft/3000lbs (R-pod size) travel trailer.

    I wanted to get your inputs on what mods you would add to the truck. Obviously a brake controller is a must but would better shocks help or anything else as well just let me know? Before all the 5.7 replies start coming in, I get it but would like inputs to the proposed question.....thanks for your time

    My Thoughts:
    - Brake Controller
    - TRD rear sway bar
    - Transmission Cooler
    - New Shocks?

    Also do you know if a dealer would install a brake controller or transmission cooler after market so not affect the warranty? I know almost all RV dealers will install the brake controller but sure if this would do anything to the warranty or if isn't a big deal.
     
  13. Jun 21, 2020 at 10:23 AM
    #13
    JohnLakeman

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    What model year Tundra? For 2017 and earlier MY, adding an aftermarket brake controller is easy plug-n-play. You can easily DIY providing an in-dash installation that's out of the way, and at your finger tips.

    For 2018+, adding a brake controller is a little more complicated, and you will need to be cautious that RV shops really know what needs to be done. There is a thread here specifically addressing installation of aftermarket brake controller on 2018+ Tundra. It's not hard, you just have to know where access the harness.

    Generally, dealers will not install a transmission cooler on a truck under warranty for sure, and maybe not at all. There has been discussion ad nauseam here about Toyota deleting the front air-to-fluid exchanger on 2019+ 5.7L Tundras in favor of the transmission warmer/cooler. Data coming in from towing owners is beginning to show that this will be reliability issue if you're towing heavy (near rating). I hardly ever tow, but did recently tow 3500 pounds for maybe 1.5 hours. Transmission fluid temp reached 230 degrees, and that's a concern to me.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2020
  14. Jun 21, 2020 at 11:29 AM
    #14
    Tundra234

    Tundra234 New Member

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    Alot of them
    Arent they the same transmission?
     
  15. Jun 21, 2020 at 11:35 AM
    #15
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    No.
    5.7L = AB60E/F
    4.6L = A760E/F
     
  16. Jun 21, 2020 at 11:43 AM
    #16
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    Appreciate the reply... yeah I have 2018 and know the thread your talking about. It was mostly the reason I was searching for the tow package, actually couldn't believe they removed that feature. While Im not mechanically incompetent it looked liked a lot more work than i wanted to take on and wondered if an RV dealer acutely knew any better, feel they say whatever. Also make sense about the warranty and trany cooler...didn't think of that really which the wife will not be down with lol
     
  17. Jun 21, 2020 at 11:44 AM
    #17
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    I think "mechanical" they are they same just one without transmission cooler?
     
  18. Jun 21, 2020 at 11:49 AM
    #18
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    Engines are the near identical except for displacement. Transmissions are totally different except for basic design principles.
     
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  19. Jun 21, 2020 at 2:38 PM
    #19
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    You can retrofit a transmission fluid cooler to your 2018 4.6L using stock 2010-2013 Tundra transmission cooler parts, but if you have a transmission problem, Toyota may void your warranty. I have confidence in the transmission's reliability, but not without cool fluid.

    My estimate on cost is approximately $400-$450, with about $275 in Toyota parts, another $175 in aftermarket transmission cooler, bulk ATF hose, and miscellaneous hardware. Eventually, I'll probably do the retrofit using Toyota parts from the transmission to radiator area, and then aftermarket cooler and bulk ATF hose to connect. This is the parts list I've put together for my retrofit. Some of the Toyota part numbers should be confirmed with @Roman:

    1 ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-thermostat-unit-3297134030
    Note: A760 transmission only. This thermostat replaces existing spacer plate, existing warmer is reinstalled to this thermostat.

    1ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-cooler-pipe-329070c040
    Note: This cooler pipe assembly for 2010-2013 4.6L. Should work for 2014+ (needs confirm). Bolts to side of engine two places.

    2ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-hinge-bolt-9008010400
    Note: Flange head bolts for cooler pipe assembly brackets to engine (needs confirm).

    1ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-inlet-hose-329410c040
    Note: Insulated connector hose from thermostat to cooler pipe assembly.

    1ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-outlet-hose-329420c050
    Note: Insulated connector hose from thermostat to cooler pipe assembly.

    2ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-ring-o-9030120012
    Note: New o-rings for existing warmer/cooler (needs confirm).

    8ea https://parts.toyotaofcoolsprings.com/oem-parts/toyota-inlet-hose-clamp-9046616004
    Note: Hose clamps for all 10mm Toyota hoses, and 3/8" id bulk ATF hoses to exchanger (needs confirm).

    Aftermarket parts:


    Edited to increase heat exchanger capacity, See Post #22 below:
    1ea https://www.holley.com/products/dri.../supercooler_transmission_coolers/parts/70273
    Note: B&M 70273 plate and fin heat exchanger, 15000 BTU, capacity (~19000 GCWR) should easily exceed Tundra tow rating.


    2ea https://www.holley.com/products/plu...adapters/npt_to_an_straight/parts/AT981668ERL Note: 1/2" MNPT X AN-6 male adapter for cooler connections, requires AN fitting below for hose connection.

    2ea https://www.holley.com/products/plu...per_stock_push_on_hose_ends/parts/AT709167ERL Note: Elbow adapter, AN-6 female to 3/8" id hose barb

    The AN fittings are pricey, but provide infinite flexibility for compact routing of the cooler connection hoses. If you want to use less expensive straight brass 1/2" MNPT to 3/8" hose barb fittings, that can be done, but positioning of the cooler horizontally along the grill opening will depend on bend radius of bulk ATF hose. I plan a vertical orientation on RH side of grille opening, inlet at the bottom, and outlet at the top. Horn will likely have to be relocated.

    If you prefer to eliminate the expense of cooler adapter fittings altogether, B&M also sells this kit with an exchanger of same dimensions (14400 BTU) with 11/32" id hose barb connections. Expect to heat the supplied 11/32" id hose in the kit with heat gun or hair dryer to stretch fit on Toyota cooler pipe assembly:

    https://www.holley.com/products/dri.../supercooler_transmission_coolers/parts/70264

    Edit: Here are diagrams of before and after transmission thermostat retrofit:

    2010-2013 4.6L Without ATF Cooler.jpg
    2010-2013 4.6L With ATF Cooler.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
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  20. Jun 21, 2020 at 5:24 PM
    #20
    hudrock

    hudrock [OP] New Member

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    Wow you far exceeded my abilities after about the second sentence lol... thanks I appreciate it

    I’m probably just going give in and buy a decent used 5.7, maybe try to get one with the bigger gas tank... seen a few around not terribly priced I just hate going through the process I suppose
     
  21. Jun 21, 2020 at 6:39 PM
    #21
    JohnLakeman

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    The retrofit is not as complicated as all this detail appears. My intent was to inform you, not intimidate you. Specification of required parts is tedious detail, but execution is not as complicated if you are a wrencher. Good luck with your decision.
     
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  22. Jun 24, 2020 at 1:29 PM
    #22
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

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    Based on information found in the following thread started by @Krohsis, I am thinking that if you are towing HEAVY, it will be better to spend a little more money up front for a bigger heat exchanger:

    https://www.tundras.com/threads/install-complete-on-additional-transmission-cooler.12385/

    For anyone reading this in the future, I suggest that @Krohsis field experience has demonstrated the following exchanger needed to cover the towing limits of your 4.6L Tundra:

    https://www.holley.com/products/dri.../supercooler_transmission_coolers/parts/70274
    Note: B&M 70274 plate and fin heat exchanger, 29200 BTU capacity. Other materials remain the same. @Krohsis installed this exchanger in series with an existing tow package cooler (5.7L) for towing heavy.
     

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