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2008 brake secret?

Discussion in '2nd Gen Tundras (2007-2013)' started by ChuckT17, Nov 11, 2015.

  1. Nov 11, 2015 at 12:32 PM
    #1
    ChuckT17

    ChuckT17 [OP] New Member

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    Is there a secret to getting good brakes on my '08 Tundra?

    At 120,000 miles I had the brakes redone, all 4 corners, new pads and turned down the rotors.
    Afterward I expected the brakes to be "like new" (ha!) - the brake pedal was soft, mushy and pulsed.
    Took it back had them drain, refill with fresh, and bleed.
    Still soft, mushy and pulsing.
    Took it back.
    They turned the front rotors again ("you wife must have had the Towing control set wrong").
    Still soft, mushy and pulsed.
    Took it to a different shop. Had them replace Front (only) rotors and pads.
    Better but still soft and mushy.
    So ... before I do anything else is there a secret sauce to Tundra brakes?
    OEM fluid?
    Bleeding the system at a hidden fitting?

    Any help?
    cvt
     
  2. Nov 11, 2015 at 12:40 PM
    #2
    Sean266

    Sean266 #ThinBlueLine Staff Member

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  3. Nov 11, 2015 at 12:48 PM
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    LOTSOFTOYS

    LOTSOFTOYS New Member

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    Sounds like the shop that turned the rotors did a Shitty job because it still pulsed. Then rotors were replaced and pulsing went away. Oem pads?
     
  4. Nov 11, 2015 at 12:52 PM
    #4
    TruckLife900

    TruckLife900 All Eyez On Me

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    Also sounds like a crappy brake bleed job...
     
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  5. Nov 11, 2015 at 7:35 PM
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    bobeast

    bobeast really old member

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    I'd replace the rotors. Not all rotors can be successfully turned and it isn't really that expensive to change them. 2nd, Go not back to this mechanic. They should never let it out of their hands with soft/mushy brake pedal.
     
  6. Nov 11, 2015 at 8:48 PM
    #6
    MotoTundra

    MotoTundra Adrenaline Addict

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    I'm no brake expert, but when it's time for brakes I always go with new pads and new rotors. I go with a quality pad like Hawk or something similar. It seems that a lot of places sell brake pads with a lifetime warranty, which in my opinion means the compound of the pad has to be really hard. What ends up happening is the pads don't wear but the rotors wear and warp as a result of the crappy pads.
    If your driving style (heavy foot or towing) or conditions (long steep declines) are heating your brakes too.much, maybe try slotted/cross drilled rotors on the front to stay a bit cooler?
    Like you said, if your brakes feel mushy the brake fluid probably needs to be bled. If it was done maybe it was done incorrectly.
     
    matluth likes this.
  7. Nov 12, 2015 at 6:33 AM
    #7
    matluth

    matluth Fish On!

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    I went the same route. New rotors and pads all the way around.
     
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  8. Nov 12, 2015 at 7:48 AM
    #8
    15whtrd

    15whtrd New Member

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    How about the brake hoses. Sounds like a good time to change them out for some braided hoses. That can cause some sponginess too.
     
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  9. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:04 AM
    #9
    Sefferston

    Sefferston #35sandlongtravel

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    Steel braided will reduce some squishyness, but if the lines aren't bled correctly then the squishyness will be there. You can use a brake bleed kit, but personally, I like doing the old fashion way of press press hold. Takes 2 people but always worked for me.

    Start furthest away from the MC, then work your way towards it. Do that twice while making sure the MC is constantly filled, should be good to go after that.
     
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  10. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:18 AM
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    TruckLife900

    TruckLife900 All Eyez On Me

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    ^^^^^^^Exactly :thumbsup:

    I like to alternate brake fluid colors (ATE blue then amber/gold) between bleeds - that way I know when I've pushed all the old fluid completely thru. Problem is blue isn't being sold in the US anymore :confused:.
     
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  11. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:39 AM
    #11
    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    How often are you bleeding your brakes?
     
  12. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:47 AM
    #12
    jberry813

    jberry813 The Mad Scientist

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    What?
    I guess if your truck only lives for 5 years. I bleed mine every 2 years. Moisture will get in the brake system no matter what and deteriorates fluid, especially dot4. Spirited driving (and braking) exacerbates the problem.
     
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  13. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:48 AM
    #13
    15whtrd

    15whtrd New Member

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    I think you're supposed to do it every 2-3 years. I flush my brake fluid every time I change the pads on my vehicles.
     
  14. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:53 AM
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    csuviper

    csuviper Moderator Staff Member

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    Lol. I deleted that extra part before you posted. I see recommendations are between 2 and 3 years for various manufacturers. I have only done a full brake fluid change once in all the vehicles i have owned. Guess i never had each of them more than 4-5 years anyway. I will have to add this to the maintenance schedule then. I will go for every 2-3 years depending on feel of the brake system.

    http://www.aa1car.com/library/bfluid.htm
     
  15. Nov 12, 2015 at 10:59 AM
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    TruckLife900

    TruckLife900 All Eyez On Me

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    I always do a fresh bleed before any track days. If you ever do any track day activities tech inspection will check your fluid among another things... boiling brake fluid is a bad day. :boom:
     
  16. Nov 12, 2015 at 11:24 AM
    #16
    LOTSOFTOYS

    LOTSOFTOYS New Member

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    In a dry ass climate like ours, the brake fluid stays decent for quite some time. I rarely flush vehicle unless the system was comprimized some how. Normally a bleed does just fine.

    Most do not drive as "spirited" as jberry....
     
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  17. Nov 19, 2016 at 9:43 AM
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    ChuckT17

    ChuckT17 [OP] New Member

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    Revisiting this topic.
    Firstly I can easily recall when "high performance" cars were recommended (this was in an owner's manual) to have their brake fluid drained, then the system flushed with alcohol (methyl?) and refilled and bled with fresh brake fluid every 2 yrs/36k miles. The alcohol would absorb any water and the flushing would purge contaminates.
    Secondly I have seen a discussion about brake system proportioning valve body that frankly said it was overlooked by most shops because the procedure was more involved than they cared to commit to and was an addtitional expense to the customer. I read that as hard to do properly and hard to justify.
    Well I think a complete drain, flush, and refill probably would accomplish what the alcohol flush was meant for.
    But what about that proportioning valve bleed (Toyota most likely has a more sophisticated name for the item) has anybody encountered, tried that?
    I'm still unimpressed by our Tundra's brakes (at 147k miles). When the truck was new they were noticeably better than they are now. And I've had the rotors replaced, shoes replaced, even the master cylinder replaced. They still (currently) feel more like a bucket of stiff Oatmeal than I believe they shoud.
    Opinions? Comments?
     
  18. Nov 19, 2016 at 10:31 AM
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    Leakypunt

    Leakypunt New Member

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    I also have 2015 Tundra with spongy brakes. Pads and rotors ingood condition as only 40k kms on the truck. Seems like air inside but no brake work has ever been done?? Any ideas??
     
  19. Nov 19, 2016 at 10:59 AM
    #19
    ChuckT17

    ChuckT17 [OP] New Member

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    Hey I'm in the same boat.
    Next thing left to change is the flex lines, 2 on front 4 in rear. Estimate $300.00.
    Blech!
    As I said _above? I've encountered several (3?) accounts that suggest that the proportioning valve needs to be bled and shops aren't doing it.
     
  20. Nov 19, 2016 at 4:16 PM
    #20
    Leakypunt

    Leakypunt New Member

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    Just read on another forum to bleed the air fromthe VSC assembly using techstream. Anyone tried that?
     
  21. Nov 19, 2016 at 5:40 PM
    #21
    ChuckT17

    ChuckT17 [OP] New Member

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    Can do that without special tools?
     
  22. Nov 20, 2016 at 6:28 AM
    #22
    cdkenne

    cdkenne Toyota Master Technician

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    I've done it. Air bleeding with the Techstream can be useful in determining if there was air in the lines to begin with. Depending on model, it can force a steady flow of fluid through the line. If you are using a clear bleeder hose then you can see if there is any air.
     
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