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The ALMOST Free AutoHeadlight Upgrade Thread

Discussion in '2nd Gen Tundras (2007-2013)' started by mudrunner88, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. Jan 17, 2021 at 7:41 AM
    #1
    mudrunner88

    mudrunner88 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2021
    Member:
    #57324
    Messages:
    14
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2011 Black Tundra SR5
    None Yet Just Got Her
    Over the years I have learned that engineers that work for car manufacturers create one part number with much functionality and then limit it somehow for base model cars. They then put a different inexpensive piece in, or clip a piece of plastic etc which allows functionality of all it's features for high end use and then charge more for a different part number.

    Is this unethical? As an engineer, I would say no. I would call it smart and helping your company produce net profit. But knowing this secret, you can sometimes find features in your car you didn't know you had ;)

    TOOLS / ITEMS REQUIRED FOR MOD: Dremel w/grinding bit (one that looks like a drill bit), Scribe, Small Flat Heads, Small Philips, Torques bits to remove air bag, 19mm (I believe) to remove center nut from steering wheel. Some nice crimpers (I will leave a photo and link), 3 strands of 24-AWG (green, black, and Orange) some early models show grey instead of orange in schematics. You will also have to go on E-Bay and pick up a generic light sensor for about $8-$14, and read the attached PDF for some pins to order, and a plug for the sensor end.

    Credit: I do not recall where I found the attached PDF. It gives clear precise photos and instructions for pinout of the wiring, etc so I won't repeat that hear. Just give it a once over and that will be the last step of the guide. I give thanks to this author and take no credit, just adding too.

    Preface: Unhook your battery! I will assume everyone reading this thread already is familiar with know how to pull the airbag, and combo switch off of the steering column. If not there are tons of threads here already, no need for me to :deadhorse: (Beat a dead horse) on that.

    1) Once your combo switch is remove bring it to a work bench area. On the turn signal/headlight side near the center you will find two tiny philips head screws. Go ahead and remove those.

    2) Once remove, carefully use your small flat head to gently pry the cover off the small box. Look for small clips and take your time. The inner part near the steering column area will pop off on it's own, also there are no moving parts exposed so pry away but be gentle.

    1.jpg

    3) Here is an inside view once the cover is off. We want to pay particular attention to the contacts on the right side of this photo below. The 4 in a row operate parking lights and headlights. The two lonely ones at the bottom are actually limited by a plastic knob, those leads go to the green wire, and black wire shown in the schematic of the attached PDF

    2.jpg

    4) Here is another shot of the whole cover off pointing at the two contacts you should familiarize yourself with.

    4.jpg

    5) EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY!!! I took the next cover off my switch to show everybody how this works. I DO NOT SUGGEST THIS, it took about 1/2 hr to safely remove the cover without breaking it!
    What you see now is 3 contacts that are allowed to slide back and forth when you twist the headlight knob. We want to pay attention to the two left contacts. We want them to hit the ones that are on the cover in the photo above to close the circuit.

    5.jpg

    6) Here is how far the slider is limited from the factory, notice the space below it where I placed the screwdriver. The point of this mod is to allow the slider contacts to be able to travel this entire distance.

    6.jpg

    7) Here is my Headlight switch with fogs. You can see I had my headlights turned on all the way, but if I were able to go to where the screwdriver points (just a little past headlights) I would be in AUTO-Mode.

    7.jpg

    8) Let the fun begin. :curls: If you followed along you should have only removed one outer cover. Now reach down with a scribe and pull up the clip in the photo. While doing this pull OUT on the head light knob to remove it.

    8.jpg

    9) Sliding out assembly with the rod

    9.jpg

    10) Separate the rod from the tip of the knob, pay attention to orientation here so you can put it back together correct.

    10.jpg

    11) Here you can see some raised pieces inside the knob. I'm pointing to the parts that limit our travel. In the background you can see a little white nub sticking out. There are two of those on the stalk and that is what produces the click as you turn the knob.

    Start by taking your dremel and removing about 1/3 to almost 1/2 but no more than that of the limiter where I'm pointing. Remember this is a 2011 Tundra SR5 model with fog lights and the autos are ABOVE the headlight area. Other switches may be different so proceed with caution, I'm not responsible if you ruin your expensive switch!

    11.jpg

    12) HOLD ON TO THAT DREMEL! It will try to fly away and bite the center of the knob!!!
    When done it looks like this. You can see little dimples where the white nubs sit as you turn the knob. Go ahead and flatten out a dimple in the middle of both parts that you ground off so it's below the surface (see bottom area for clarity). Now use a scribe to pick out all the fines from grinding, this is important or else your switch will feel crunchy. I added a little di-electric grease, I'm sure you can use white lithium, etc because the nubs had some on it when taken apart.

    12.jpg

    13) Reverse installation as required. If it won't 'click' in place use your scribe to hold the part that drives the slider. Pull out on the scribe while you push in on the knob until it clicks in place. Now check your travel, you should have full motion and it should feel good.
    Put the cover back on until it snaps in place, put two philips screws back on. Install back on the truck/car.

    13.jpg

    14) Read the PDF and follow the directions for installing the sun sensor and wiring.

    sensor.jpg
    Here are the crimpers that I use on everything now days. Well worth the price! They can crimp factory Toyota pins, etc. which you can source from Japan and many other places. Got mine on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0045CUMLQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    astroCrimpers.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
    joonbug, YotaFan05 and 70m4h4wk like this.
  2. Jan 19, 2021 at 4:14 PM
    #2
    Dalandshark

    Dalandshark Infected with 5G

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2020
    Member:
    #43002
    Messages:
    628
    Gender:
    Male
    Northwest
    Vehicle:
    2007 Tundra SR5 5.7 Longbed
    Eibach Level LIft
    Pretty cool, thanks for the info. I just leave my headlight switch on and let them turn on and off with the vehicle. Much safer to drive with headlights on all the time.
     
    mudrunner88 [OP] likes this.
  3. Jan 20, 2021 at 4:54 AM
    #3
    mudrunner88

    mudrunner88 [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2021
    Member:
    #57324
    Messages:
    14
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2011 Black Tundra SR5
    None Yet Just Got Her
    I agree, but during some long summer days it can seem pointless sometimes. But you are right, you just Never Know.
     
  4. Jan 21, 2021 at 4:30 AM
    #4
    Cruiserpilot

    Cruiserpilot New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2020
    Member:
    #55579
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    202
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    Male
    Vehicle:
    2007 RCLB
    So you are wanting DRL? Daytime Running Lights?
     

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