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Suggestions on a front leveling kit and tires for 2006 Tundra DC

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Jkrew619, Sep 16, 2021.

  1. Sep 16, 2021 at 7:47 PM
    #1
    Jkrew619

    Jkrew619 [OP] New Member

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    Needing on your suggestions to which front leveling kit is the best for my 2006 Tundra DC. Just want to level with the stock rear height.
    Also, just put on a 4 Runner limited 20 inch wheels and what tire size is the best for it? I like the aggressive look.thanks for the input!

    925C270F-1FF2-44B6-A198-6A230F45F19E.jpg
     
  2. Sep 16, 2021 at 11:48 PM
    #2
    NickB_01TRD

    NickB_01TRD You don't need less cars, just more driveway.

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    Theres lots of good info on the site. Take a look around at others posts as well.
    Hit the search button upper right. Click more. Under search in forums disselect "all forums" and select 1st gen. Then under "order by" change it to relevance. (On mobile at least not sure about PC) and search away.
    Others may chime in with specifics but there are threads on here that cover your topics in a similar way.
    I'm not usually a fan of those wheels on these trucks but I don't think they look too bad on yours.
     
  3. Sep 17, 2021 at 12:22 AM
    #3
    jerryallday

    jerryallday New Member

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    Spacer lift or Bilstein 5100 for the front depending on your budget. Start there and hit YouTube.

    I have a pair of spacers you can have if you want to go that route. Just pay for shipping.
    I never used them

    Wheels
    in my opinion 16 or 17 inch look best

    tires
    I think A/T tires look aggressive, anything equal or greater than 32.5 inch will rub so be ready to hammer away.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2021
  4. Sep 17, 2021 at 1:57 PM
    #4
    Riverdale21

    Riverdale21 Speed seeker

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    Dirt Deeds injectors, Addco rear sway, AEM dry flow air filter, last ever set of Stan's Try-Y headers, Borla full custom exhaust, front level, wheel spacers, and lots of electronics.
    Bought these on Amazon. Levelled my truck out nicely, front same height as the rear.

    Supreme Suspensions - 2" Front Leveling Kit for Toyota Tundra Front Aircraft Billet Aluminum Strut Spacers 2WD 4WD (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00J4XD4U2?_encoding=UTF8

    For tire size there are plenty of threads on here. Seems to be more about width being an issue with rubbing. I think most guys stay within 265 width on stock sized offset wheels. Not sure what the offset on your 20's are but the 2016 17" Taco rims I run I used 1.25" wheel spacers to bring them out flush to the fender flares.
     
  5. Sep 18, 2021 at 3:23 PM
    #5
    2006Tundra

    2006Tundra New Member

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    How much do you want to spend?
     
  6. Sep 18, 2021 at 7:28 PM
    #6
    KarmaKannon

    KarmaKannon Master of None

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    Be ready to mess with the cv boots if you lift the front. That means either new clamps or new boots or maybe a diff drop. Clamps and diff drop are easy. New boots suck to do.

    I did a 2" on mine and immediately had to do new clamps on the boots because it wasn't holding the boot with the steeper angle. I ended up doing the diff drop. Not sure if the drop was really needed, but it helps cv angles.
     
    FrenchToasty likes this.
  7. Sep 18, 2021 at 7:30 PM
    #7
    FrenchToasty

    FrenchToasty Desert rat, 6 lug enthusiast

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    I probably could have gotten away with new clamps when mine started slinging grease, but I went ahead and rebooted the oems while I had aftermarket in the truck, now I’ve got trail spares, not that I’d ever want to change a CV on a trail…..
     
  8. Sep 18, 2021 at 7:34 PM
    #8
    KarmaKannon

    KarmaKannon Master of None

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    About a year ago I was practiced enough do a cv boot on the side of a mountain. Now I've messed with too many things to remember the tricks. In reality, the boots aren't all that bad. It's messy and I hate the clamps/tool, but it's much better than removing a shaft from the CV axle assy.

    Likely these boots are going to be almost 20 years old. Planning for replacement is a good idea if it's been sitting at stock height that whole time. I think I didn't do mine because I knew I'd be getting into the shafts sooner or later anyway.
     
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  9. Sep 19, 2021 at 3:19 AM
    #9
    Jcross0304

    Jcross0304 New Member

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    What kind of aftermarket boots? Mine is slinging grease since I lifted the front.

    Which diff drop did you go with? Any vibration afterwards?
     
  10. Sep 19, 2021 at 7:32 AM
    #10
    KarmaKannon

    KarmaKannon Master of None

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    Don't recall which brand. It was about the cheapest one I could find. They all looked the same. No vibrations until I just lifted the back end some yesterday. Dif drops shouldn't give you any vibes.
     
  11. Sep 19, 2021 at 7:33 AM
    #11
    FrenchToasty

    FrenchToasty Desert rat, 6 lug enthusiast

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    The dealer sells a boot kit that comes with grease and clamps, but it’s a royal pain, I’d try to get new clamps on first and see if it stops
     
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  12. Sep 19, 2021 at 11:45 AM
    #12
    Jcross0304

    Jcross0304 New Member

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    Alright thanks. What did you use to lift the rear? I used 1" blocks that have 1 degree of taper to help with the drive shaft angle. I ordered the kit from low range off-road. I believe wheeler's has them also. Only place I could find the tapered blocks.

    https://lowrangeoffroad.com/2005-toyota-tacoma-1-cnc-block-and-oem-metric-style-u-bolt-kit.html
     
  13. Sep 19, 2021 at 11:47 AM
    #13
    Jcross0304

    Jcross0304 New Member

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    How hard is it to remove the clamps? Any special tools to put the new clamp on? I'm assuming once you remove the clamp you could slide the boot back to put more grease in there?
     
  14. Sep 19, 2021 at 11:50 AM
    #14
    FrenchToasty

    FrenchToasty Desert rat, 6 lug enthusiast

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    The oem clamps are one time use that require a special tool to tighten the new one, you can find worm drive clamps with a rounded edge(to prevent cutting into the boot) and clamp them again that way. And yes you could squish some more grease in
     
  15. Sep 19, 2021 at 12:02 PM
    #15
    KarmaKannon

    KarmaKannon Master of None

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    I purchased a fairly fresh set of new leaf springs with the mini pack that replaces the overload spring and then I added two thinner leaves to replace the smallest factory leaf left after the mini pack was added. I tried that combo and gained about 1" and then I added the overload spring to gain another 1" about. I'd guess I'm about 2-3" taller than stock in the back, which is plenty big for my taste with the 35" tires. Here's a picture. It might explain some of what I rambled.

    I might be cutting the overload down though. It almost rests on the rivet that holds the retainer U plate deal at ride height. Not sure I'll like that, but it did ride nice when I tried it yesterday.

    PXL_20210918_020447310~2.jpg
     
  16. Sep 19, 2021 at 12:16 PM
    #16
    Jcross0304

    Jcross0304 New Member

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    That's a lot taller then I did. I did install the Firestone airbags to use when I'm towing I leave them at 15 lbs. when not in use and it seemed to lift the rear just a tad. You probably need to put a spacer in between your carrier bearing to get rid of the vibration. @Outbound used some flat washers to drop it to help trouble shoot it. Not sure how many he added but I believe he said it fixed his vibration issue. Curious what he is going to use for a permanent solution.
     
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  17. Sep 19, 2021 at 12:20 PM
    #17
    Outbound

    Outbound SSEM #2.5, Token AmeriCanadian

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    I used about 3/4" of washers, so 6 or 7 iirc. Next days off I'm going to cut some flat bar to size, drill holes and install them. That said, I read on some other forums that people have just ben leaving washers in there without any problems. It's probably fize 95% of the vibration. I could maybe go a bit lower but they I'd have to install new bolts.
     
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  18. Sep 19, 2021 at 12:41 PM
    #18
    KarmaKannon

    KarmaKannon Master of None

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    I was going to try some washers today sometime and then cut some spacers from .25" steel at work this week. It didn't seem bad, but it was a difference when I went up that last 1".
     
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