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Specific Brakes Servicing Question (2012 Tundra)

Discussion in 'General Tundra Discussion' started by DeckerDie, Oct 19, 2021.

  1. Oct 19, 2021 at 3:41 PM
    #1
    DeckerDie

    DeckerDie [OP] New Member

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    Cain
    Panama City Beach, Florida
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    2012 Tundra SR5
    Hey all, hope you guys are doing great! I’m about to service my brakes and have the following planned:
    (2012 Tundra SR5, 2x4, 4.6L)

    •Pads Replacement

    •Brake Fluid Flush (Full Exchange)

    •Replacing All 4 Brake Discs

    •General Cleaning of Calipers (not replacing, nor do I plan to remove the pistons and clean the reservoirs they’re seated in; just surface level with caution around the piston surfaces). Also replacing the rear caliper pins rubber hardware (Carlson 16005). I do plan on fully detaching the calipers (Only one off at a time) and bleeding once all 4 are reinstalled.

    My question is when should I actually swap the brake fluid in the procedure?

    Just flush it before ever disconnecting the fluid lines and avoiding everything but the bleeder valve; just getting it out of the way before touching a pin or piston? (Of coarse bleeding after all 4 calipers have been serviced)

    Should I reset all the calipers pistons first, then flush the fluid before pulling the calipers off? or is it better to just disconnect, reset the pistons while they’re disconnected and flush the fluid at the same time as bleeding?

    Should I do the whole brake job and bleeding procedure, drive for a little bit, then start the flushing procedure after it’s all cooled back down? (The current brake fluid is past it’s date by a couple of years if that’s important).


    Any info on the matter and just tips for servicing the 2nd Gen Tundras brakes are greatly appreciated. If this has already been covered or I’m posting in the wrong forums, please message.

    Thank you all, once again!
     
  2. Oct 19, 2021 at 3:45 PM
    #2
    snivilous

    snivilous Member

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    I would flush it after removing and reinstalling everything, since it'll mostly if not completely drain from removing the calipers to begin with. Pull calipers off, put brake line in a bucket and it'll drain, do whatever you plan to do with the calipers and rotors, reinstall. Repeat 4x. Brake system will be nearly fully drained by then, now flush any remaining fluid out then bleed as required.
     
  3. Oct 19, 2021 at 3:49 PM
    #3
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    I flushed after replacing all rotors and pads. It was easy to do during the bleeding. Just pump the pedal a bunch first with the bleeder open then start bleeding. It doesn’t take much. The rear was maybe in the 20s and front was less pumps. There’s not alot of fluid in the lines.
     
  4. Oct 19, 2021 at 3:53 PM
    #4
    DeckerDie

    DeckerDie [OP] New Member

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    Cain
    Panama City Beach, Florida
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    Thanks for the reassurance! I was thinking the fluid would all just fall out the calipers while cleaning them, but I head read in like ‘one’ place that some fluid would stay and it would be where the most compromised fluid is (don’t know if anyone would suggest pulling the pistons just to clean, pretty sure it has some special grease different from the regular silicone and metal on metal you’d use). Was leaning towards adding the new fluid and bleeding at the same time. Thanks again!
     
  5. Oct 19, 2021 at 3:59 PM
    #5
    DeckerDie

    DeckerDie [OP] New Member

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    Cain
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    Thanks for the response! Did you disconnect the calipers or were yours in good condition? I’m out in saltwaterville and already have cleaner and penetrating oil on the ready lol. Would you suggest pushing the pistons in while still connected as well? Thank you again for the feedback!
     
  6. Oct 20, 2021 at 4:02 AM
    #6
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    I live up north where we get a lot of snow and road salt. On my 2018, I replaced the rear calipers last year and fronts this year because they were rusted pretty bad and sticking. I could’ve probably cleaned them, but they aren’t that expensive. It is much easier to replace pads and get them to stay in place by taking the calipers off.
     
  7. Oct 20, 2021 at 4:33 AM
    #7
    timsp8

    timsp8 Member

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    I use this. It’s the same concept though. It’s supposed to have a one way valve in it.

    https://www.amazon.com/Allstar-Perf...t=&hvlocphy=9005231&hvtargid=pla-448887493813
     

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