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Replacement rotors and pads

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Musashi66, May 22, 2019.

  1. May 22, 2019 at 3:34 PM
    #1
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    My front brakes squeal like a stuck pig - there is not better way of explaining it. They don't always squeal, but when they do, it is very, very loud. Pads are in good shape, but the rotors are original, and knowing my dad, I don't think they were ever machined before.

    So, I'm thinking about replacing the rotors and pads. It is something I can tackle at home in a few hours, but I am not sure what kit to buy.

    1A auto has the complete kit with two rotors and pads for $90 - has anyone used it, and is it any good?

    I've seen the PowerStop Z36 kit for $200, but I am fairy sure I don't have any interest in drilled and slotted rotors. I have no clue if I have 13WL or S13WE calipers - is this something I can find by removing the wheel, is it just right on the caliper?

    I can just buy some Bosch rotors for $80 for a pair, and then pick some good pads, is this a good option?

    I can also go OEM for around $200 for both rotors and brake pads. When I first got the truck, I needed a pad replacement at 33k miles with OEM stuff.

    I don't tow, I rarely go off-road - the truck is mostly used a few times per week to transport 3 dogs to a dog park. It might get more use starting next April, but currently it sees maybe 200 miles per month.

    What's my best option here? TIA!
     
  2. May 22, 2019 at 3:57 PM
    #2
    Festerw

    Festerw New Member

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    I had Centric rotors and ceramic pads put on at my last state inspection. Fine for everyday driving as long as your rear brakes are adjusted properly.

    I've started using ceramic since I hate brake dust.
     
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  3. May 22, 2019 at 4:04 PM
    #3
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Crawl under the front and I think you can read the side of the calipers with a flash light shined sideways to highlight the imprint.

    Mine are WE ‘weak’ calipers, but they stop well since new rotors/pads (brand?) install last year. Mine were warped since 2003.
     
    Musashi66[OP] likes this.
  4. May 22, 2019 at 4:31 PM
    #4
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    Thanks, I'll try to do so once the truck is back from the mechanic. Is it possible that you, the keeper of the answers regarding 1st gen trucks, doesn't have input on the brand of rotors and pads?? :)
     
  5. May 22, 2019 at 4:35 PM
    #5
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    Any idea on which Centric model you used? They sell for $27ea for base and $64ea for Premium models. Did you use their pads as well?
     
  6. May 22, 2019 at 4:51 PM
    #6
    Festerw

    Festerw New Member

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  7. May 22, 2019 at 5:52 PM
    #7
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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  8. May 22, 2019 at 6:02 PM
    #8
    Festerw

    Festerw New Member

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    Nope. They've been on for 6 months now, no problems daily commuting, towing, or hauling.

    I've used Centric for the last 5 years or so with no issues.
     
    Musashi66[QUOTED][OP] likes this.
  9. May 22, 2019 at 9:54 PM
    #9
    marbleville

    marbleville Agent Provocateur

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    Tires and brake parts have always been an area where I purchase premium; it goes back to my Harley days, and riding the thin rail of the two wheeler where such parts are critical to survival.:violent: Centric used to have a good reputation, but it has taken a hit of late from the rumors I've heard, yet can't produce. And I like the drilled and slotted rotors for heat dissipation, the bane of brakes, though I can't point any fingers at supportive facts - it's a gut thing. I have been a fan of high end Power Stop rotors that are drilled and slotted for dust and heat dissipation with less glazing of the rotor and pad surfaces. And I like softer pads that wear quickly but stop better, IMHO.:pray:
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
    Musashi66[OP] likes this.
  10. May 22, 2019 at 10:09 PM
    #10
    SoCalPaul

    SoCalPaul New Member

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  11. May 23, 2019 at 4:38 AM
    #11
    bmf4069

    bmf4069 Yup, that's car parts in a dishwasher

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    Never, never, NEVER use centric parts.

    20190215_192001.jpg


    20190215_201350.jpg

    Brand new shoes that were missing the locator pin. POS. If you want a good DD kit for the front RA has a 13wl kit with calipers for $260 including a $68 core charge. It's what I went with.
     
  12. May 23, 2019 at 5:35 AM
    #12
    TX-TRD1stGEN

    TX-TRD1stGEN I'm not taking a knee

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    I have the powerstop kit in the original post and it had been great for 32,000 miles. Still lots of pad left and the rotors still look great!
     
  13. May 23, 2019 at 6:45 AM
    #13
    00TundraZ

    00TundraZ New Member

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    I have the Z36 kit and upgraded to the 13WL kit. I have been happy with it. I didn't need drilled and slotted rotors, however with their comparable price and such I decided to go for it. I have been happy with them. They come with good instructions on how to properly 'bed' your pads/rotors. Follow that to a 'T' and you should have a great experience with them.

    The number is stamped on the back of the caliper, so the side facing towards the truck. I think for me to get a good look at it I had to jack up the truck and look. look for '13' and then some letters after it :D
     
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  14. May 23, 2019 at 7:22 AM
    #14
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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  15. May 23, 2019 at 7:35 AM
    #15
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    I've spent too much money on this truck as it is, so no caliper upgrades for me. I am fine with the braking performance, as long as they don't warp it's all good. As I thought, PowerStop option is getting a lot of votes, but I am still on the fence with slotted and drilled rotors in a cheap kit.
     
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  16. May 23, 2019 at 8:06 AM
    #16
    00TundraZ

    00TundraZ New Member

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    Totally understand. I replaced my calipers because once I got in there to do the rotors I found out half of my caliper was seized up. So instead of messing with rebuilds or whatever I just bought the whole kit.

    Good luck in your search! I hope whatever you end up with gives you many years of life!
     
    Musashi66[QUOTED][OP] likes this.
  17. May 23, 2019 at 8:11 AM
    #17
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol ABS light OG

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    What has to be done for this upgrade? Just cutting the dust shield?
     
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  18. May 23, 2019 at 8:19 AM
    #18
    00TundraZ

    00TundraZ New Member

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    Yes sir! Bolts right up to the factory mounts.
     
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  19. May 23, 2019 at 5:07 PM
    #19
    Aerindel

    Aerindel New Member

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    The issue is that they DO warp. Or at least that is what people say.

    I'm in the same boat though. Don't want to buy new calipers but I have warped rotors and this is the second set in as many years.

    Just do some research. Drilled and slotted rotors are a result of the good idea fairy.
     
  20. May 23, 2019 at 5:14 PM
    #20
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    I don’t have a problem with drilled and slotted on a $5000 Porsche GT3RS setup (probably even more knowing Porsche). But general consensus everywhere I’ve seen is that drilled rotors on a cheap set is a recipe for failure. $170 for two rotors and set of pads qualifies as cheap.
     
  21. May 23, 2019 at 5:17 PM
    #21
    Aerindel

    Aerindel New Member

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    I guess it depends on where you hang out. The general consensus on the car sites I hang out on is that drilled and slotted is only for looks and makes your brakes slightly worse if anything.... but people like the way it looks and have come to expect it on performance cars....so when other people see it on high end cars they think they need it on their normal car.....when the truth is it was just a 'good idea' someone had a long time ago that actually has no application at this point.
     
  22. May 23, 2019 at 5:31 PM
    #22
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    If you’re replying to me, I said the same thing.
     
  23. May 23, 2019 at 6:39 PM
    #23
    marbleville

    marbleville Agent Provocateur

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    I spent a little time working as an auto shop technician, I guess you would call it now. Anyhow, in the time I worked there I clearly noticed that the rotors with the holes and slots showed less heat glazing than standard rotors. That tells me they did in fact dissipate the heat better, and the reason they are my rotors of choice.:curls:
     
  24. May 23, 2019 at 8:33 PM
    #24
    Aerindel

    Aerindel New Member

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    Ironic since nether drilling or slotting is supposed to dissipate heat better. Slotting is supposed to 'cut' the pads to remove glazing and keep the surface fresh, drilling is supposed to allow gases given off by old style brake pad material to vent instead of building up under the pads and pushing them away from the rotors. Neither are needed or effective with modern brakes.....they do however reduce the mass of the brake disc, and its surface area and thus (slightly) decrease the amount of heat it can take, but the effect is small enough that most people won't notice worse braking.
     
  25. May 23, 2019 at 8:37 PM
    #25
    SoCalPaul

    SoCalPaul New Member

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    We stopped using drilled rotors on our vintage race cars. They cause cracking in the rotors.
     
  26. May 23, 2019 at 8:43 PM
    #26
    Aerindel

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  27. May 23, 2019 at 9:23 PM
    #27
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    That’s pretty much what I’ve been seeing regarding drilled rotors for everything but the very high end stuff. That’s why I’m reluctant to go drilled on a $170 kit.
     
  28. May 24, 2019 at 12:03 AM
    #28
    marbleville

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    Nice article with truth as they see it. I, on the other hand, am old school and tend to change beliefs stubbornly when I see value in the old ways. My experience runs counter to the article when talking about heat dissipation. I used to spend a great deal of time crawlin' and haulin' in the mountains where the slotted rotors were far more effective at reducing the heat from prolonged braking on the downhill runs. After one too many close calls due to overheated brakes, I switched over to the drilled rotors and seriously improved the mountain braking. For me they work, and I'm not about to change without some serious incident proving their shortcoming over solid rotors.:burnrubber:
     
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  29. May 24, 2019 at 2:56 AM
    #29
    usmchawk

    usmchawk New Member

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    I'm keen on PowerStop rotors and pads. I have them on my Acura TL and Highlander, and have also put them on my sister's Rav4. I go to a local mechanic that used to be a Toyota Master Mechanic before he started his own shop. Last time I saw him, he told me that the drilled and slotted rotors for the Tundra is not a good option as they have a high rate of failure. While I don't yet need brakes (8K miles so far on OEM), when I do I'll stick with the premium PowerStop (non-slotted and non-drilled) full kit. They are well made, all the parts, clips and grease is included and they have done exceedingly well on my Acura and Highlander.
     
  30. May 24, 2019 at 9:14 AM
    #30
    Musashi66

    Musashi66 [OP] New Member

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    I think that’s what’s I’ll fo as well. Under $100 on rock auto. If it doesn’t work well, I’ll go back to oem rotors next time. These have served me well over 134k miles.
     
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