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Point me in right direction: Tundra for cross-country travel

Discussion in 'General Tundra Discussion' started by crhawkeye, Apr 18, 2020.

  1. Apr 18, 2020 at 4:37 PM
    #1
    crhawkeye

    crhawkeye [OP] New Member

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    Looking to buy used, probably max at 22k. Between 2010-2017. Help point me in the right direction on what to buy. First time truck buyer. Need this to be a work-horse.

    What it needs to be good at
    - Lots of highway miles cross country traveling.
    - Gravel and dirt roads storm chasing in spring.
    - Most of the time with 400 to 1500lb in the bed when not storm chasing. (popup camper or topper I can sleep in)
    - Some off-roading on mountain or desert trails. (think nasty rocky mountain 14er trails or unforgiving territory like Death Valley)
    -- trail example: https://www.14ers.com/php14ers/trailheadsview.php?thparm=sj01
    - Possibly some lighter towing down the road. Think camper < 6000lbs

    Questions
    1) What trim should I focus on? (know I want 4x4 and double cab)
    2) Would an off-road suspension package be problematic if I were to have 1500lb in the bed?
    3) How much for suspension/lift with good performance if I do it myself? (or is this advisable if I'm mostly on-road traveling -- I do like the look of slightly lifted and leveled)
    4) What v8 should I focus on: 5.7 or 4.6?
    5) Any tips on used Tundras in this time frame?
    6) If the vehicle doesn't have a tow package -- how much can I tow, and how much to equip the vehicle to tow cost wise?

    I've settled on the Tundra because I need the capabilities of a full sized truck and want the reliability the Tundra possesses.

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2020
  2. Apr 18, 2020 at 4:57 PM
    #2
    831Tun

    831Tun heartless Bastrd

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    Warren
    Santa Cruz
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    '16 CM limited
    TC long travel. Deaver 420 SU leaf packs.
    One of the very few issues with the Tundra is the rear leaf packs tend to go flat quickly when there's weight like what you're describing over prolonged periods. So, plan on upgrading the leaf pack and talk to someone like Jeff at Deaver springs, Valley Spring in AZ. Don't waste time/ money with expansion packs/ add a leaf. You may need air bags??? I dunno
    5.7 for sooo many reasons.
    trim level doesn't matter, it's entirely personal preference.
    Most 2nd and 3rd gen Tundra's come stock with a tow package. I dunno of one that doesn't,,,,,, I could be wrong????
     
    joonbug, smslavin and crhawkeye[OP] like this.
  3. Apr 18, 2020 at 4:58 PM
    #3
    Trooper2

    Trooper2 Premium Lone Star Member / SSEM #13

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    JR
    Houston, TX (Suburban South)
    Vehicle:
    2007 Tundra 5.7 L Double Cab TRD 2WD
    TSS 20's with Cooper ATP ll's, N Fab 3 Step Nerf Bars,, Pioneer AVIC-8100NEX, Masters Tailgate Replacement Latch with Camera, 1" Maxtrac Shackles, LED Interiors/Brake/Reverse/Cargo/Fog Bulbs, Fumoto Drain Valve, Toyota Aluminium Oil Filter Housing, TRD Shift Knob, Courtesy Door Projector LEDs with Toyota Emblem, Console Tray and Lower Divider.
    Welcome from TX! lots of questions there.

    2007-2013 same body, 2014 - current are same. No reason not to consider a lower mileage or good shape 07 -09. All have same drive trains.
    Some 4.7's in 07-08 models. 5.7 mostly recommended, more HP. A few 1,000,000 mile 4.6's documented.
    Max payload is actually only like 1100 lbs. Do some research.
    A few models to chose from, SR5 may be lowest with 4x4 and towing.
    Suspension lifts are recommended, starting about $1500.00, will need front end alignment.

    Good Luck!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2020
    crhawkeye[OP] likes this.
  4. Apr 19, 2020 at 6:10 AM
    #4
    Cpl_Punishment

    Cpl_Punishment Young men never die.

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    Rosy
    Alberta, Canada
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    2020 MGM SR5 CM 4X4
    Boost Auto mirrors, RSB, Leer Legend canopy, Line-X bed liner
    Lower trims should have slightly higher payload due to fewer features.

    5.7 for sure.
     
    WFD473 likes this.
  5. Apr 19, 2020 at 8:23 AM
    #5
    TacomaLC

    TacomaLC New Member

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    T-town
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    2020 Tundra Voodoo 2000 Tundra LTD Red (rest in pieces)
    Here's a good breakdown on model years (it covers features by year and known issues):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Tundra

    Basically the truck is largely unchanged since the 2007 model year. A refresh came in 2014. Biggest options besides cab/bed configurations were engine size (4.6 v8 and 5.7 v8--and a 4liter v6 ---does that even count?) and fuel tank capacity (26 vs 38 gallon). I guess trailer brake controller came later and might be something you want. I would go as new as possible. Only major issue I've read about is a cam tower seal leak. Lots written on this forum. Not sure how common this is. I believe it's more of a major nuisance but can be costly to repair. They hold their value. But new ones can be had pretty reasonably. Mark downs are in the $3000-$6000 plus whatever Toyota is offering (another $3000 isn't rare) Good luck.

    Edit: as far as load capacity the 2020 GVWR is 7000#. Base weight is 5530 to 5670 (dbl cab 4x4 and crewmax 4x4 respectively) so that give you a load capacity of 1470-to- 1330 minus driver/passengers weight.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2020
    Cpl_Punishment likes this.
  6. Apr 19, 2020 at 12:45 PM
    #6
    crhawkeye

    crhawkeye [OP] New Member

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  7. Apr 19, 2020 at 1:52 PM
    #7
    Trooper2

    Trooper2 Premium Lone Star Member / SSEM #13

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    Houston, TX (Suburban South)
    Vehicle:
    2007 Tundra 5.7 L Double Cab TRD 2WD
    TSS 20's with Cooper ATP ll's, N Fab 3 Step Nerf Bars,, Pioneer AVIC-8100NEX, Masters Tailgate Replacement Latch with Camera, 1" Maxtrac Shackles, LED Interiors/Brake/Reverse/Cargo/Fog Bulbs, Fumoto Drain Valve, Toyota Aluminium Oil Filter Housing, TRD Shift Knob, Courtesy Door Projector LEDs with Toyota Emblem, Console Tray and Lower Divider.
  8. Apr 19, 2020 at 2:03 PM
    #8
    JLS in WA

    JLS in WA New Member

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    Somewhere in the basalt rocks with my dogs
    Vehicle:
    2008 White DC Limited 4x4
    Drahthaar Transport Unit
    Damn. That's a low miles truck. I agree, check KBB, NADA, and Carfax for values. I paid 18k for a 2008 4x4 Limited DC that had 84k miles on it. It came with a topper and TRD wheels. I think this is probably a very fair price.
     
    crhawkeye[OP] likes this.
  9. Apr 19, 2020 at 2:44 PM
    #9
    Trooper2

    Trooper2 Premium Lone Star Member / SSEM #13

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    Houston, TX (Suburban South)
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    2007 Tundra 5.7 L Double Cab TRD 2WD
    TSS 20's with Cooper ATP ll's, N Fab 3 Step Nerf Bars,, Pioneer AVIC-8100NEX, Masters Tailgate Replacement Latch with Camera, 1" Maxtrac Shackles, LED Interiors/Brake/Reverse/Cargo/Fog Bulbs, Fumoto Drain Valve, Toyota Aluminium Oil Filter Housing, TRD Shift Knob, Courtesy Door Projector LEDs with Toyota Emblem, Console Tray and Lower Divider.
  10. Apr 19, 2020 at 4:23 PM
    #10
    art64

    art64 New Member

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    4x4 is a must. You don't want to be a sitting duck when storm chasing. If you can find a Tundra with large gas tank that will be a plus. Suspension: for 3 inch lift with 600 lb/inch springs will do unless you're planning on driving it like a trophy truck. King or Fox shocks with adjusters. Since you'll be spending a lot of time on the road and off road, adjusters will help you tailor the suspension stiffness/softness for different terrains and driving style. Also, your load varies from light to really heavy, you can stiffen the shocks for more damping when hauling heavy loads. Makes a more stable truck. Air bags in rear so you can adjust the level of the truck with various load weights. If you change to 35 inch tires, highly recommend to re-gear to 5.29. It'll help a lot on acceleration and overall drivability. And mpg as well. D or E rated tires. See if you can find a DCLB. Almost $10k worth of mods here. Do not buy a Tundra with no tow package. The gearing maybe different. Not worth the expense of retrofit.
     
    crhawkeye[OP] likes this.
  11. Apr 21, 2020 at 6:22 PM
    #11
    crhawkeye

    crhawkeye [OP] New Member

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    Thanks for all the advice.

    So if I'm interested in lifting and leveling a bit -- would that necessarily mean a new suspension on an already off-road suspension package?

    Trying to figure out if there is any point in buying an off-road package vehicle if I'm going to mod it.

    Thanks
     
  12. Apr 21, 2020 at 6:49 PM
    #12
    Trooper2

    Trooper2 Premium Lone Star Member / SSEM #13

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    Houston, TX (Suburban South)
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    2007 Tundra 5.7 L Double Cab TRD 2WD
    TSS 20's with Cooper ATP ll's, N Fab 3 Step Nerf Bars,, Pioneer AVIC-8100NEX, Masters Tailgate Replacement Latch with Camera, 1" Maxtrac Shackles, LED Interiors/Brake/Reverse/Cargo/Fog Bulbs, Fumoto Drain Valve, Toyota Aluminium Oil Filter Housing, TRD Shift Knob, Courtesy Door Projector LEDs with Toyota Emblem, Console Tray and Lower Divider.
    I believe the only difference in suspensions on various models are the shocks, they all have the same ground clearance, shocks being the only difference. The Pro models have a 2 in lift and upgraded shocks. Your price range excludes a Pro.
    A Level like a 3 & 1 is more affordable and quite common which is done with spacers in front and blocks or shackles in rear. The ride is compromised a little, and probably not ideal for any serious offloading. I believe a 4-6 in lift requires more work to, driveshafts, steering, and new UCAs up front. maybe more.
     
    crhawkeye[OP] likes this.
  13. Apr 21, 2020 at 7:08 PM
    #13
    crhawkeye

    crhawkeye [OP] New Member

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    Part of it is vanity -- I don't like the nose down look so much. Some of it is physical clearance. Some of the rocky mountain trails I have been on have big ass rocks. I'm fine crawling over them slowly, but I like to know I'm going to be able to get over a large protruding object without damaging my vehicle.
     

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