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Considering DIY for leaks

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Moyota, Mar 2, 2024.

  1. Mar 2, 2024 at 12:12 AM
    #1
    Moyota

    Moyota [OP] New Member

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    So i do all of my regular maintenance and what not. Biggest thing ive gotten into was replacing idler pulley, tensioner pulley and serp belt ik its not much… Well the valve covers and oil pan have been leaking a bit of oil lately and i figure they need new gaskets. Watched a few videos of it. Want to do it myself to save a few bucks but im not too mechanically inclined thus i’m worried i’ll fuck something up. Any advice on how to get better on working on these things in general i feel like i could do it but im just too worried I’ll screw something up. Should i just go for it or would i be better of taking it to a shop. … definitely will be taking it to shop when it’s time for new timing belt the amount of tear down needed stressed me out just watching the video on youtube. Sorry for the rant.
     
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  2. Mar 2, 2024 at 5:33 AM
    #2
    gnatehack

    gnatehack New Member

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    Take your time (people have time, you just need to get motivated), be patient with yourself AND the truck and you’ll be golden.

    When, not if, the going gets rough for you remind yourself repeatedly you are saving hundreds of dollars. When, not if, you mess something up you for surely know who did it and make sure to learn from your mistakes.

    How do you get better at something like being your own mechanic? You practice. You make mistakes. You buy wrong parts and have to research the correct ones. You gain experience and intimate knowledge of your particular vehicle and what its foibles are. You try, you fail, you try again and you start succeeding more than you fail. You buy tools and end up being the guy/gal that all your friends look to when they have any sort of car question

    I was once in your shoes and I decided if the dudes on the internet can replace something, I sure as heck can too!! So can you if you get motivated. Gaskets are a good place to start, just do it!
     
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  3. Mar 2, 2024 at 5:41 AM
    #3
    CCE525

    CCE525 New Member

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    I would second Gnatehack. As long as you have time and room to do it it’s worth the money saved. Take plenty of photos, label and bag fasteners and be safe.
     
  4. Mar 2, 2024 at 6:07 AM
    #4
    Griff04

    Griff04 New Member

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    Good advice from CCE525 and Gnatehack. I’ve been doing industrial maintenance and working on my own vehicles for 40+ years, yes, I’m old fart. I always keep this in mind, “a man designed and built it”, so just “about” any man can work on it and fix it.

    A Factory Service Manual is your best friend and forums such as these can get you through just about anything. There’s a lot of knowledge on this forum that everyone is willing to share with you.

    One thing you want to remember and use religiously is sticking to your torque specs and using anti-seize compounds when applicable. Too many times I’ve read that someone snapped a bolt off by over tightening it, this is especially true when working on smaller bolts such as the valve covers and oil pans. Paying attention to detail and doing small things will take you a long way..wire brushing you rusty bolts before re-installing them, organizing everything while disassembling, just think it through.

    Simply put, doing some of the routine maintenance work is not “rocket science” but you must fully understand “the task at hand” before diving into it.

    Good luck on your ventures and don’t forget to share your knowledge as you continue to grow.
     
  5. Mar 2, 2024 at 6:38 AM
    #5
    FishNinja

    FishNinja Hide Your Daughters

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    I would just say when working working like the valve covers and oil pan. You gotta be careful about cleanliness. You’re opening things that aren’t supposed to be exposed for extended periods of time. So ensuring you’re not in a dust storm (indoors preferably) super organized and ensure you’re being as clean as possible so nothing goes in where it can possibly fuck shit up.

    otherwise it’s not any different. You unbolt. Do whatever needs to be done. Re bolt, torque to spec. And done.
     
  6. Mar 2, 2024 at 6:58 AM
    #6
    2mchfun

    2mchfun Yeah it'll pull it, just don't expect to stop!

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    As said above, it's about taking your time and thinking about every step. Speed comes with experience, obviously not now. If you have time and a place, take pictures of everything, label everything, lay all parts in order, put bolts back into holes they came from when possible, obviously not the cover/pan fasteners. Be careful when removing, you don't want to bend covers/pan. Mostly the process is about thinking and patience. I would suggest you do the oil pan first and train yourself to be patient and think things through. Be careful and keep everything clean & organized along the way. Good luck!
     
  7. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:12 AM
    #7
    ATBAV8

    ATBAV8 New Member

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    [​IMG]
    Toyota Tundra 2WD,4WD (00-06), Sequoia (01-07) Haynes Repair Manual (Paperback)
    by Haynes | Sep 1, 2010
    414
    Paperback
    $27.00$27.00
    List: $39.95$39.95


    One-Day
    FREE delivery Tomorrow
    More Buying Choices
    $25.00(19 used & new offers)
      • Before the advent of the internet and YouTube videos, these things were the way DIY maintenance got done. I personally own this one, and I use it in combination with videos and forums. I think this is invaluable because it gives you a step by step breakdown of whatever it is that you're doing. Torque specs, wiring diagrams, and just general questions can be easily answered. Highly recommend.
     
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  8. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:21 AM
    #8
    2mchfun

    2mchfun Yeah it'll pull it, just don't expect to stop!

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    Exactly! Even better than that is the factory service manual set that is a series of volumes. However, they are costly and that's if you can get lucky enough to still find a set. I probably value my manuals more than my vehicles.
     
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  9. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:26 AM
    #9
    jerryallday

    jerryallday New Member

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    Take your time, watch a lot of YouTube videos, avoid power tools and have a torque wrench
     
  10. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:43 AM
    #10
    Jack McCarthy

    Jack McCarthy Truck repair enthusiast; Rust Aficionado

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    Damn. I recall paying $13.95 for it when it came out. Just 2000-2002 though.
     
  11. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:43 AM
    #11
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    Confidence comes with successes and learning.

    First off, quit self-deprecating/kicking/demeaning yourself. Do you know how many people think those two tasks are "too difficult", so they won't even do that? Those two things alone are significant accomplishments and should be celebrated. Don't be a putz. Pat yourself on the back. The fucking serp belt alone is like damn brain teaser toy trying to get it oriented for some folks, I've seen some post saying as much, at least for the 2UZ.

    There are three important parts to successfully repairing anything, not just cars:
    • Have the right tools for the job, or at least something that works effectively, and I'd start with two torque wrenches, one for lb-inch and one for lb-foot (and know how to properly care for them, some need you to zero out before putting away)
    • Have a decent overview or fundamental understanding (/general idea) of what you must do
    • Be at least somewhat aware of dangers (if any)
    • Reference material is helpful but not mandatory (for cars, FSM is your best friend) so you can view "official" processes, torque specs, etc.
    The first one is something that comes with time, and sometimes an initial investment. For backyard/shadetree mechs, sometimes that comes in the form of running up to Harbor Freight/Northern Tool to buy a suitable one-time-use tool. Sometimes it means going to the local auto parts store (FLAPS) and using the toal loaner program to borrow something and hoping it's not pre-mangled.

    It helps to watch some videos end-to-end on YouTube before any task so you get the overview, may pick up some tips, but be aware, there are more hacks than pros on YT, so don't believe everything you see. More on that later.

    Last but not least: SAFETY FIRST. Especially with things like wheel chocking, properly raising and securing your vehicle, using quality PIN LOCKING jackstands that haven't been recalled for failure, tossing a wheel under the vehicle, eye protection, all that stuff.

    First off: https://www.tundras.com/threads/valve-covers-fix-or-leave.105385/#post-2712883

    There's all the info you need, with links out to examples and pro tips, and part numbers. And I'll warn you because some of the videos I saw on YouTube for this topic, 2 out of 3 were hacks who didn't do shit right. (for the 2UZ specifically)

    But you should also know: You can find links to the FSM for your truck on here. The valve covers, IIRC the torque is 53 INCH LB, which is not much, barely past finger tight. Before you replace them, you may want to simply try backing them out half a turn with non-ape force while the engine is hot (b/cthere's a mild snap risk for salt-ridden trucks) and if they back off, you'll want to torque them down to spec with a properly setup wrench, again, in INCH pounds, not lb-foot.

    Plenty of 2UZ owners have found the issue with leaks is simply that the rubber washer dried up a bit and the bolts backed out a bit. Just don't get too forceful with those bolts if they're on tight ... they will snap if you ape on them or tighten down too much. Then you've got some drilling/extraction to do.

    First, beyond what's above, you've got a few states of being:

    => Being overly worried about screwing shit up, so reticent to start
    => Being oblivious to screwing shit up, so you screw shit up and are reticent to continue
    => Being aware you can screw shit up, but proceeding cautiously while learning and asking for advice
    => Being confident in your basic abilities and fundamental knowledge, to the point you can do anything with a decent reference

    It sounds like you're somewhere between the first and the third. I can already tell you, you won't be the 2nd one, because you're too tied up in the first. Being somewhere between the first and third are probably the best place to start, and as you continue to have successes (and maybe the occasional fail), you'll grow the confidence you need to find yourself in that last line item.

    Part of the process is learning the 'always do this' stuff, i.e. the fundamentals. Like, always break your lug nuts free before you jack up a vehicle to remove a tire. Or, if you're dealing with poly bushings, always use silicone-based lube anywhere they'll touch metal unless you love squeaking. Use grease to your advantage, it's great for holding small things like bearings in place. These are all things you'll pick up watching videos on YouTube and such. Two channels I cannot recommend enough for Toyota:

    There are others out there, but those two not only work on Toyota specifically, but they take the time to explain the ins-and-outs, give you the kind of advice a seasons certified mechanic will, but from the lends of someone with 2+ decades of professional experience under their belt

    I'll also warn you: You need to be wary of some popular videos with regards to advice. I've found several TRQ videos problematic in their instruction. There are some parts-manuf'ers/sellers out there, like 1A Auto, who do a great job of laying out how to replace stuff. But with Toyota specifically, I can't recommend to use either OEM parts, or use the OEM supplier --> i.e. Denso/Aisin/Sumitomo/Advics, and sometimes Dana/Spicer, Koyo, Timken for bearings, and other name brands on some things like the 2UZ uses Hitachi for the MAF.

    We've watched a number of parts manufacturers - Moog is probaby the biggest offender - go completely, horrendously, sadly down the shitter on brand quality in the last 10-20 years. There are still some brands out there which you'll find in parts stores which still make decent parts, but they're much fewer are farther in between. The average lifespan of any parts-store part that's non-OEM these days is 2-5 years. Always factor that in with purchase price. "Am I OK with needing to change this 2-5 years down the road?" If the answer is "NO", buy OEM.

    Last tidbit I'd share is be careful where you purchase your parts. DO NOT purchase parts at scAmazon, fleaBay, WallyMart. They DO NOT assert adequate control over their sellers or even their inventory/supply chain,to protect you from counterfeits. And as quite a few here have found out the hard way, you will eventually get counterfeit parts if you shop with those vendors. You can typically get parts just as cheap or cheaper buying from safe vendors like Summit Racing or Rock Auto. And it's worth plugging, a lot of FLAPS have online coupons for in-store-pickup online orders. Like, the coupon "RMN15" almost always works with Advance Auto for 15% off on applicable items*. Always pop by www.RetailMeNot.com to check for coupons before ordering.

    I've typed enough already. Thankful I type as fast as I talk - there's your elevator pitch ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2024
  12. Mar 2, 2024 at 7:55 AM
    #12
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    The one thing I'll say about Haynes and Chiltons is this: They show the practical way to tackle most jobs for the layman/non-professional, correctly. They don't get overly-mired in process or bring up specialty tools like the FSM does. FSM is king though, the diagnostics sections are second to none. I have both for rerence material, one to show me the "OEM way", the other to show me the "general mechanic" way. Both have their place on your shop bench.

    I believe I may still have an extra copy of the pictured Haynes manual if someone wants/needs it. I don't remember how I ended up with two copies, but when I had to downsize my shop space, I distinctly recall finding two copies of the same. I just can't remember if I gave it away to someone on here who needed it or not.
     
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  13. Mar 2, 2024 at 8:12 AM
    #13
    2mchfun

    2mchfun Yeah it'll pull it, just don't expect to stop!

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    Totally agree, and I wasn't trying to say there's something wrong with it. I have both also. My post was more to make folks aware of FSM's as an optional reference with superior details in case they need to get in deep. Thanks for highlighting the difference between two for everyone!
     
  14. Mar 2, 2024 at 9:30 AM
    #14
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    I didn't take it that way at all, only chiming in to add extra validation to your point. You're 100% right-on in your comment, and I don't think enough people understand or appreciate the seniment you're getting across as much as they should.
     
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  15. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:22 AM
    #15
    Moyota

    Moyota [OP] New Member

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    Waiting for the engine to cool off… gonna degrease the valve covers and check to see if they’ve backed out some by torquing to spec like one of you mentioned. Then with clean covers should be able to tell if they’re still leaking.

    I’ve attached 2 pics below one of the right side valve cover and one of the left side.

    upload_2024-3-2_13-20-46.jpg

    upload_2024-3-2_13-21-0.jpg

    Pushed her a little hard this morning… tearing up some trails with my buddy… could really smell that oil burning.
     
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  16. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:26 AM
    #16
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    Bet that smells like ass. Given how much is there, I wouldn't be surprised if they just need to be backed out 1/2 turn and torqued to spec. You may even find with a socket and extension, they're not even finger tight.
     
  17. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:28 AM
    #17
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    PS - The fact they're covered in oil may play in your favor. I find most people who have snapped off their VC bolts, snapped the ones on top near the manifold... which rarely see splashes of oil. Steel + aluminum will chemically freeze together with time and no lube.
     
  18. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:40 AM
    #18
    Moyota

    Moyota [OP] New Member

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    Yeah just stuck a 10 mil on a few of em and they turned pretty easy hardly any force needed to get them to spin… i’ll have to see if i can rob a torque wrench from a buddy and get em torqued down to spec.

    Ps. oils pressure doesn’t really drop any don’t know if that means i’m not leaking too much or what.
     
  19. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:48 AM
    #19
    shifty`

    shifty` call-response overturns conviction every time

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    Worst comes to worst, hand+extension tight + 1/4 turn with a ratchet should get you in the ballpark, but I'd only do the lower bolts. Tekton makes decent budget wrenches, and I'm pretty sure Advance Auto and others sell them, have them in stock. You could order online and use the 15% coupon (RMN15) and pick up in the store today, I'm guessing. Their shop will tell you if it's in stock. Just make sure what you get does lb-inch, not inch-lb. It's typically either/or.

    If you're planning to wrench more in the future, this 3-pc set from Tekton is a good buy that will let you do everything: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0C4BT9ZK7/

    But just know, those micr-adjust ones are the ones you need to adjust to zero before putting away, else they'll lose calibration over time.
     
  20. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:58 AM
    #20
    2mchfun

    2mchfun Yeah it'll pull it, just don't expect to stop!

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    Beware you can strip threads and break bolts by applying too much torque to oily bolts. Clean up the bolts and holes with some solvent and compressed air if at all possible before you torque them.
     
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  21. Mar 2, 2024 at 10:59 AM
    #21
    Moyota

    Moyota [OP] New Member

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    I’ll definitely look into that most definitely will be needing some in the future. As for now i’ll take your advice on hand tight plus 1/4 turn…. figures while i’m in here may as well clean engine bay and throttle body. It’s all pretty filthy.
     
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