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Brake Caliper piston seems to be stuck. Changing pads and rotor

Discussion in '2nd Gen Tundras (2007-2013)' started by GreyToy, Dec 1, 2021.

  1. Dec 1, 2021 at 9:28 AM
    #1
    GreyToy

    GreyToy [OP] New Member

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    It was time for a brake pad change and I also needed to put a new right front rotor. Rear brakes no problem. Changed everything on the front but after putting the outside pad in, the inside pistons were still too far out to get the inside pad in (Right front). I took the old pad slid it in and used a "C" Clamp to push them in further. Instead the top piston went all the way in while the bottom piston slid all the way out and seems to be stuck in that position.

    On one of the brake changing videos someone said to just open the bleeder valve, push it back in, have something to catch the old fluid then just refill it and pump the brakes back up when your done. Except someone followed up stating then you will be required to bleed the whole system.

    Can anyone tell me the proper procedure for getting these pistons back in? I did take the caliper back off and tried to push them back in evenly, but that bottom piston wont move.

    Photo attached for reference or were I am stuck at.

    brake piston.jpg
     
  2. Dec 1, 2021 at 9:34 AM
    #2
    Occidentalis

    Occidentalis Out Snakin'

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    I used to get stuck / difficult calipers all the time on my Honda - like you, I'd use a block of wood and a c clamp. They also make a piston squeezing tool specifically. Were you able to put the pad / block in front of both pistons before you squeezed?
     
  3. Dec 1, 2021 at 9:44 AM
    #3
    GreyToy

    GreyToy [OP] New Member

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    Yes, but it was like the top piston sucked in and the bottom pushed all the way out.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2021 at 9:44 AM
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    blackdemon_tt

    blackdemon_tt Battery Slayer

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    A huge C clamp with the brake pad will do.... I have 1 at home Ill take a pic later today... As long as its not seized you should be ok
     
  5. Dec 1, 2021 at 9:47 AM
    #5
    audiowize

    audiowize New Member

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  6. Dec 2, 2021 at 8:02 AM
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    COTundie

    COTundie Whoa Black Betty

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    I just use multiple clamps (prefer the hand squeezey type) and just go one piston at a time.

    Guess old pad or something to bridge the gap reduces the amount of clamps required to only 2.

    I also always crack the cap on the fluid reservoir to reduce the resistance of the fluid flowing back into the tank.... Just hope that some asshole didnt top off the reservoir when the pads were at a very worn state. I suppose one should really bleed the brakes while there (reducing fluid level), but I am lazy and only bleed when I feel a soggy pedal.
     
  7. Dec 2, 2021 at 8:52 AM
    #7
    Johnsonman

    Johnsonman New Member

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    LED headlamps/fogs; interior footlamps.
    The 'stuck' piston is crooked, must be made straight before attempting to push in. Just look at those two thin lines surrounding the piston's end, they must be perpendicular to the opening/edge of rubber gaskets.

    Just tap gently on the part that is protruding too much, looks like backside and toward top. Then use a C-clamp, centered as best as possible. I like to use one of the worn pads as a hard flat surface that will push Evenly across the piston so it does not go crooked again. Luck.
     
  8. Dec 2, 2021 at 9:22 AM
    #8
    Trident

    Trident New Member

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  9. Dec 2, 2021 at 9:48 AM
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    Rubberdown

    Rubberdown Spilling my guts here.

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    Yeah. Always squeeze it back in with the brake pad so they push in even. Otherwise they do that. Gonna take some finagling now.
     
  10. Dec 4, 2021 at 5:13 AM
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    CTB Mike

    CTB Mike It's RED? My rods and cones must be screwed up!

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    Are you really replacing only one front rotor? As an old time brake mechanic, I always replaced everything in pairs, whatever was done to one side was done to the other. I have seen too many problems otherwise.
     
    Danny3737 likes this.
  11. Dec 4, 2021 at 6:02 AM
    #11
    Sumo91

    Sumo91 Oil snob

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    @Johnsonman is correct, the piston is crooked. I just rebuilt my calipers a couple months ago. You should be able to grab the piston and get it centered, then apply pressure to get it into the bore. Don't worry if the top piston pops out some, get that bottom one in the bore first, then when both pistons are level with each other, try to compress both at once with the old brake pad. I personally use large channel locks, you can use 2 pairs, one on each side of the brake pad applying equal pressure to each piston.
     
  12. Dec 4, 2021 at 11:41 AM
    #12
    blackdemon_tt

    blackdemon_tt Battery Slayer

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    this is the one I use... cuz I dont ask anymore
    20211204_114034.jpg
     
  13. Dec 6, 2021 at 12:38 PM
    #13
    GreyToy

    GreyToy [OP] New Member

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    You are right, the piston was crooked, I didn't even really look at the photo, looking a it to the naked eye you couldn't tell it was crooked. As I mentioned in my OP I had used the C Clamp, I have done brake jobs before. I bought the tool above, was done in 10 minutes on the right side and about ten minutes on the left. There is no way to get a C Clamp to connect straight on these calipers without having to keep playing around with it. The brake caliper tool is definitely the way to do it easy.
     
    Occidentalis likes this.

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