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Tundra payload is under rated

Discussion in '3rd Gen Tundras (2014+)' started by Stumpjumper, Oct 3, 2018.

  1. Jun 12, 2019 at 8:24 PM
    #31
    Atomic City Tundra

    Atomic City Tundra Cam Tower Leak Addict

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    They are called factors of safety. Engineers use them to help prevent the unexpected. Manufacturing defects, changes in material quality, assembly errors, blah, blah, blah, blah. So you are correct - the truck can "handle" more than the advertised or rated load. That is how they design it. With a (sometimes large) factor of safety built in. That keeps things safe. That keeps people from dying. You never know when you might have something go wrong a steel processing plant that creates abnormalities in grain sizes, excess precipitates or contaminants, heat treatment errors, etc - that causes a relatively serious degradation in the strength of the material. You never know when a welding process might suffer some type of systemic issue that allows some seams to go through with weaker properties. Etc, etc, etc. They test these things regularly and do catch a lot of things that come up with processing. But, they don't test all of them, and they don't catch all of them. I have worked in industry as a Mechanical Engineer in a production environment - things slip by from time to time. Recalls happen, but still.... That is one of the reasons factors of safety are built into the design. Because people and processes fuck up.

    Sorry, this shit pisses me off to no end. I get ridiculed and laughed at sometimes for it. "The weight police". Usually it is by people that have no clue about any of the physics or Engineering involved in the design process. The factors of safety are there for a reason. Why fuck with them?

    I should stop posting to this and other similar topics. It doesn't do any good. People will continue to overload their vehicles (sometimes grossly) because it "handles well" to them - or because they think that their mighty Tundra is really a 3/4 ton truck in disguise - or because they are only driving for a few miles on back country roads at 25 under the speed limit. I'll continue to keep my eye out for them and do my best to avoid them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019 at 8:31 AM
    ColoradoTJ, ChrisTRDPro and Rider0120 like this.
  2. Jun 13, 2019 at 12:00 PM
    #32
    Xtaco16

    Xtaco16 New Member

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    I had 3000#. Seemed to do OK short distance Didn't realize 1500 is max

    16050.jpg
     
  3. Jun 13, 2019 at 12:16 PM
    #33
    JonSVSB

    JonSVSB New Member

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    I put 2640lbs in my bed of concrete last week. It was debris and was on the bumpstops. oops. Weighed in and out at the dump for verification. Felt guilty for sure.
     
  4. Jun 13, 2019 at 12:39 PM
    #34
    Rider0120

    Rider0120 New Member

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    Ranch Hand full replacement bumper
    F13DA4B5-0FA2-4EFC-94EF-3168A95C6681.jpg
    Half ton frame

    551DCE87-9948-47B4-B0A9-1575A5EA1BFA.jpg
    3/4 ton frame
     
  5. Jun 13, 2019 at 12:46 PM
    #35
    Coolhardy

    Coolhardy New Member

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    Too many to list
    I love pushing shit to the limits but still be in control.

    I have air bags so you think it will prevent springs from flattening?

    I have 3.5 lift with beefier suspension, control arms and steering components

    Frame damage is highly unlikely like you said.

    Engine is supercharged so it has the power there.

    Its re-geared so should be fine there.

    Transmission? don't know....

    I think our trucks are capable of doing more than advertised.
     
    ColoradoTJ likes this.
  6. Jun 13, 2019 at 2:36 PM
    #36
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ jberry813fanclub.com Staff Member

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    Airbags can help with control and leveling out, but the same pivot points are still in play. You are just on a air spring vs a bumpstop now.

    Other things are in play here:

    lifts never help with towing and most definitely lower capacities.

    Brakes rated to stop the added weight?

    The axles rated for that weight? The semi floating rear axle vs a full floating axle is a big difference and people should look at why. This is a main concern of mine.

    Remember the Nissan Titan XD that just recently bent his frame from towing a load and hitting a pothole. The shock load was just to much.

    https://www.titanxdforum.com/threads/bent-frame.20217/

    That camper is nothing more than what I see on here all the time.
     
    Coolhardy likes this.

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