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Pulling heavy

Discussion in 'Towing & Hauling' started by Roadrunner 1340, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. Aug 4, 2018 at 9:07 AM
    #1
    Roadrunner 1340

    Roadrunner 1340 [OP] New Member

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    Curious is anyone on here have a TT with dry weight around 7000, that pulls it with a TT, I am looking at purchasing one And am curious if my tundra will pull it well. 2018 crew cab TRD sport 4x4 w/tow package and rear sway bar.
     
  2. Aug 4, 2018 at 9:24 AM
    #2
    hikertrash

    hikertrash All Purpose Grunt

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    You’ll likely limited by truck payload before you reach your max on how much it can pull. Open the driver side door and look for a sticker that has the payload specific to your truck...don’t look at the payload in the Tundra brochure.

    Tundra’s are somewhat light on payload, mine is only 1270 lbs (less than brochure due to weight of any options added). Once you add up weight of yourself, passengers, gear and hitch weight of TT you can easily exceed payload. Hitch weight will typically be 10-15% of your TT weight (loaded with gear, not dry weight).

    No doubt you can pull 7000lb trailer, but you need to be able to stop it safely.
     
    15whtrd and JoshuaA like this.
  3. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:15 AM
    #3
    Roadrunner 1340

    Roadrunner 1340 [OP] New Member

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    Not to sound stupid but art the trailer brakes on the trailer supposed to help with that.
     
  4. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:18 AM
    #4
    JoshuaA

    JoshuaA Head of Potatoes

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    Closer to 6K would *feel better. You could do it with the 7K and likely be near or over max payload because that tongue wt does not take into account propane tanks, battery, whatever you store in the front compartment of the TT, over and above passengers, gear in your bed, truck mods etc. Whichever you get, use a WDH to prevent rear squat, and Airbags/Sumos/Timbrens or some type of rear support during travel as you can still bob up/down with a WDH. Depending if you can see the side of your TT or not, you might want tow mirrors. And you should set the brake controller before it locks up your trailer brakes but enough to sync with the truck.

    *The heavier you are with all your gear, the more you may lose steering control, your front will bounce like a purpoise, you get pulled into transports as you pass them, and the tail end of your trailer may wag. Inside your TT, store stuff over the axle, not at the back, don't load bikes or any other weight off the bumper. Having towed with my friend's Cummins 3/4, all those things feel mitigated and it's a more relaxing drive. I'd also go lighter RV if your travels include mountain grades vs flat-landing.

    Do the math for your total payload. The max spec is there to protect the truck's integrity, going over is at your own risk. They're not crushing payload in those Space Shuttle promos, it's just a pull.
     
    zcarpenter92 likes this.
  5. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:30 AM
    #5
    JoshuaA

    JoshuaA Head of Potatoes

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    They do, you can always get heavy duty rotors/pads as the stock ones will wear out faster. Maintain space and start the braking process much earlier than not towing. I drive at or slightly under the limit, the same speed as most transports, I'm usually between 2 for long stretches on the highway. I always factor much more travel time than not towing.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:39 AM
    #6
    Roadrunner 1340

    Roadrunner 1340 [OP] New Member

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    Another dumb question: Does the weight distribution hitch lower the tongue weight
     
  7. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:45 AM
    #7
    hikertrash

    hikertrash All Purpose Grunt

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    It doesn’t lower the tongue weight or total payload, but more evenly distributes the weight between the rear and front truck axles so that you don’t get as much sag and have better steering control.
     
    JoshuaA likes this.
  8. Aug 4, 2018 at 10:49 AM
    #8
    Roadrunner 1340

    Roadrunner 1340 [OP] New Member

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