1. Welcome to Tundras.com!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tundra discussion topics
    • Transfer over your build thread from a different forum to this one
    • Communicate privately with other Tundra owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

I'm trying to install a zero start 1500w coolant heater to my 05 tundra,

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by Winger, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. Dec 28, 2019 at 11:41 PM
    #1
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    I read some where that the heater has to be as low to possible for coolant to siphon, I cut the outside of the heater core hose and connect to the heater port with the check valve and the other port to the top of the engine of where the other end of the heater core would have connected to, my problem is that both ends of the heater would heat up and no heated coolant would enter the engine. Would anyone have any suggestions? Would the zero start heater need to be mounted vertically and have the check valve port at the bottom?
     
  2. Dec 29, 2019 at 1:47 AM
    #2
    tvpierce

    tvpierce New Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2019
    Member:
    #30129
    Messages:
    474
    Maine
    Vehicle:
    2000 Tundra AC
    I'm not familiar with that particular heater. What model is it? Does it have a circulator pump? Did it come with an installation manual?
     
  3. Dec 29, 2019 at 3:30 AM
    #3
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    No it didn't come with a manual,its a series 8000 model 3308003
     
  4. Dec 29, 2019 at 4:04 AM
    #4
    Johnsonman

    Johnsonman New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2019
    Member:
    #39132
    Messages:
    586
    Gender:
    Male
    Austin
    Vehicle:
    Sequoia
    LED headlamps/fogs; interior footlamps.
    Like this one??? https://www.amazon.com/Zerostart-33...olant+heater&qid=1577620865&sr=8-1-fkmr0&th=1

    I'd be Very tempted to read the owner/installation manual first of all. Yet if this is the model, might want to read thru reviews.

    Luck and enjoy those Toyotas. : ^ ))))
     
  5. Dec 29, 2019 at 4:50 AM
    #5
    JohnLakeman

    JohnLakeman Burning Internet Daylight

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Member:
    #26430
    Messages:
    1,733
    Gender:
    Male
    Outside of Weird, TX
    Vehicle:
    2017 MGM DC TSS 4.6L
    TRD Pro grille, 2018 LED Headlights, Undercover Flex bed cover, Neoprene seat covers, Bed/tailgate mats, Power tailgate lock, auto headlights, illuminated key switch
    It seems improbable they don't provide installation instructions. Assuming you have installed the circulation heater properly, try bleeding air out of the hoses. From FAQ on manufacturer website ( https://phillipsandtemro.com/resources/zerostart-temro-resources/faq/ ) :

    Yes, the heater is working however circulation has not been established. These heaters work using Thermal Syphoning. It is important to clear bleed all air from the lines. To test for this you will need to drain a small amount of coolant from the line.

    Here are the steps:

    1. Have a small bucket or pan ready to catch the coolant.
    2. When the vehicle is cool, loosen the top (outlet) hose from the fitting and put your thumb over the end of the hose to block the fluid.
    3. Lower this hose to below the Circulation Heater.
    4. Allow some coolant to drain into the pan until there is no obvious, entrapped air affecting smooth flow.
    5. Bring the line back up to the fitting and reattach.
    Another FAQ asks if the heater can be mounted vertically, and they say yes. I would put the outlet side highest. They also have some videos in "Resources". I didn't investigate too deeply, but maybe there's a video there showing how to install the heater.

    You mention "check valve". You should re-investigate installation of any check valve. A check valve would only be used to keep pressurized coolant from flowing through the circulation heater after the engine is running. Any "thermosiphon" effects will be stopped dead by a check valve in the wrong direction in a thermal siphon circuit. The siphon effect results from the heated coolant having less density than the cold coolant and rising. The heater should take cold coolant off near the bottom of the engine block and put it back in near the top of the engine. That "gentle breeze" will not overcome any check valve.
     
    speedtre and tvpierce like this.
  6. Dec 29, 2019 at 10:14 AM
    #6
    SaskTundra

    SaskTundra New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2018
    Member:
    #13840
    Messages:
    30
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Russell
    Vehicle:
    2004 Tundra TRD
    Roll top tonna
    This is a percolator design. Some of them have a small check ball insert in the inlet.(bottom) the overheat cut off is in the top, (cord end). You could " tee" into the oil cooler feed line on the Dr side. It is the low point on the block. The difficult part is where to connect the top end. Look at this hose routing exploded view. I removed all the stuff inside the revision cloud when I removed my failed oil cooler. Another tee into this line will be crowded and close to the serpentine drive belt so I would suggest the pass side heater hose. The flow there is the return from heater core. Full block circulation path is then possible. 20191221_072916.jpg cut into the line up top on the output of the oil cooler line is possible. Definately would need to be a check ball version to prevent parallel path when engine running.
     
    Winger [OP] and JohnLakeman like this.
  7. Dec 29, 2019 at 12:20 PM
    #7
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    Hey thanks guys,I think I will T from the hose after the oil filter and then return to T off at the return side of the heater core like you suggested.
     
  8. Dec 29, 2019 at 4:52 PM
    #8
    SaskTundra

    SaskTundra New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2018
    Member:
    #13840
    Messages:
    30
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Russell
    Vehicle:
    2004 Tundra TRD
    Roll top tonna
    1500 watts is a lot of heater. The standard wiring outlet is only 12 amps. So 12amps x 120 volts is 1440 watts. It puts you into a category where you may wind up with nuisance tripping. Unless everywhere you intend to park is wired for T20 style plugs. (20amp) Most commercial places have pedestals that limit to 7.5 - 10 amps. There are lots of household circ breakers that do not trip at the max value of 12 they just get hot. Caution advised. 1500 watt appliances where designed as short Duty cycle and will allow higher wattage for short time periods. Hair dryers for example are now sometimes 1875 watts. It only takes a few minutes to dry hair. Breakers are designed as what is called time inverse trip characteristics with a magnetic trip instant function. A serious overload of say like a stalled motor will trip almost instantly. Being 60 watts over may not trip. Ever touch a 60 watt light bulb with bare fingers after it's been on for an hour? Watts is heat. If you can get a smaller element version like say 1200 watt or 1000 watts you will have every bit as good of performance because it circulates the block not just one side of a V8 like standard block heater and reduce the trips not to mention lower your power bill. Here in Sask the price of a kilowatt hour of power is about 25 cents once all taxes and levies applied. It doesn't sound like much but plugged in every night at 6 pm until 8 am is 10 hours time x 30 days a month it will be very noticable on the monthly power bill. A timer circuit will be a cost saver. It has been shown that anything past 2 hours of online preheat is just keeping the snow melted. Heat loss of the engine to air time is about that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
    tvpierce likes this.
  9. Dec 29, 2019 at 5:10 PM
    #9
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    Thanks for your input Russell but the heater is thermostatically protected so it isn't constantly on all the time, even the cord that came with the heater is only 16/2 ,I intend to put it on a timer for 2.5 to 3 hrs for temperatures below -25C ,I also have a battery blanket from Canadian tire set up as well,with synthetic motor oil I'm ready to drive up to Norman Wells once the winter road opens... It's all plumbed in just going to try plugging it in,already started the truck a couple hrs ago and filled back up with antifreeze and so far no leaks...
     
  10. Dec 29, 2019 at 5:20 PM
    #10
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    Where abouts are you out of in Saskatchewan Russel? I grew up in Saskatoon.
     
  11. Dec 29, 2019 at 5:26 PM
    #11
    SaskTundra

    SaskTundra New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2018
    Member:
    #13840
    Messages:
    30
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Russell
    Vehicle:
    2004 Tundra TRD
    Roll top tonna
    Okay. I believe the thermo protection is for boil dry over heat cut out only it is not set for say 180 degree cycling. A watt or amp meter test would tell. Good job though I considered the circulator on my truck while I was doing the oil/water exchanger retrofit but since the standard heater is still functioning I opted for less work at this point. It took a week or more to gather what I needed already for that mod. Egads Norman Wells yes very good idea for extra preheat. I believe they use a wire categorized as "HPN" on block heaters and resistive element devices which is allowed to carry more current per AWG sizing due to higher temp rating insulation and conductor material. The rules followed in manufacturing are different than that of the CEC for general wiring. Good thing or the wife's hair dryer would have a pretty thick cord set..lol All good budd just giving advice as what I thought would be a factor.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
  12. Dec 29, 2019 at 5:38 PM
    #12
    SaskTundra

    SaskTundra New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2018
    Member:
    #13840
    Messages:
    30
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Russell
    Vehicle:
    2004 Tundra TRD
    Roll top tonna
    Canada's border city Lloydminster
     
    Winger [OP] likes this.
  13. Dec 29, 2019 at 7:39 PM
    #13
    Winger

    Winger [OP] New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2019
    Member:
    #40439
    Messages:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2005 tundra trd
    Added leaf on rear axle
    It's all good,I'm smiling like a pig in mud,plugged the heater in just now for 10 minutes at -6C in Calgary and you can barely hold on to the heater hose at the top as it gets to the T to go back down the engine at the back... Going to tackle the 50" Led light bar tomorrow...
     
  14. Dec 30, 2019 at 4:03 AM
    #14
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2018
    Member:
    #14878
    Messages:
    8,056
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Fred
    ‘Somewhere’... a State of Mind
    Vehicle:
    2002 Tundra SR5 4WD 4.7L AC Silver Metallica
    Hand Protectors
    75°F here this morning and I need some hand warmers.
     
    Winger [OP], bmf4069 and flyfisher like this.

Products Discussed in

To Top