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Engine Brake

Discussion in 'Towing & Hauling' started by Seadawg1, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. Jul 3, 2016 at 5:48 PM
    #1
    Seadawg1

    Seadawg1 [OP] New Member

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    Has anyone heard of engine brakes? Yesterday was the first time I had heard of it. I have not ever towed before and I will start to soon since I bought a travel trailer. So now I am going to learn. I have a 2007 Tundra SR5 Double cab and a 5.7 engine. And was wondering if my Tundra had that type system. thx Novice.
     
  2. Jul 3, 2016 at 6:40 PM
    #2
    Ryan Mc.

    Ryan Mc. New Member

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    An engine brake is more of a Jake Brake on semi-trucks. It's an additional valve that releases the compression within the cylinders...that loud sound trucks make sometimes. But what pickup trucks sometimes have is the tow/haul feature which uses both your transmission and engine to brake on hills instead of using your regular brakes.
     
  3. Jul 3, 2016 at 6:53 PM
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    Seadawg1

    Seadawg1 [OP] New Member

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    Is this different than when you have the cruise control on and the p/u picks up speed the engine slows down to the set speed on the c.c.? If I had that there would be a switch or something? thx
     
  4. Jul 3, 2016 at 8:57 PM
    #4
    Ryan Mc.

    Ryan Mc. New Member

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    No CC is simply adjusting your throttle. If going down hill with CC the vehicle will speed up due to gravity and the vehicle will back off from the throttle automatically. However at some point there is no more throtle to back off so applying the brakes will be necessary. All these systems do similar things but are for totally different purposes.
     
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  5. Jul 3, 2016 at 9:03 PM
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    Seadawg1

    Seadawg1 [OP] New Member

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    I thought that would have been to easy. :) Thanks.
     
  6. Jul 3, 2016 at 9:08 PM
    #6
    BlueFalconActual

    BlueFalconActual Field Day Inspector Extraordinaire

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    Engine brakes are for diesel engines. Gasoline engines naturally brake themselves due to the throttle butterfly.
     
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  7. Jul 3, 2016 at 9:24 PM
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    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ I'm a boob guy.

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    To answer your last question first, the Tundra has grade braking when in Tow Haul. It is not as good as some of the larger domestic trucks (i.e. Allison 1000 trans)

    Now to answer some of your others:

    Jake brakes are used only on big rigs. It is a special head relief system. There are other retarders as well such as oil retarders (sprays engine oil on crankshaft), electric/magnetic retarders. These are mostly used for commercial trucks.

    Now for light duty desiels...like powerstrokes, Cummins or Duramax trucks. Before the variable vain turbo systems, there were exhaust brakes that were installed in the exhaust or just downstream of the turbo that would close off some of the exhaust flow and create back pressure. This would work quite well. Jacobs made a kick ass one for the Cummins that worked well.
    Now the current manufactures use the variable vain turbos to create the same effect.

    However you are in luck, there are gasoline exhaust brakes as well, but not sure if they have an exhaust brake application for the Tundra.

    Decelomatic Corporation
    Louis King, Owner
    4837 E. Indian School Rd.
    Phoenix, AZ 85018
    (602) 956-8200
     
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  8. Jul 4, 2016 at 10:41 AM
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    Seadawg1

    Seadawg1 [OP] New Member

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    Thx
    I spent a few years living on 35th Ave and Tonto, close to Buckeye Rd. Miss the valley.
     
  9. Jul 4, 2016 at 3:02 PM
    #9
    Wynnded

    Wynnded Wait, what?

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    There are transmission retarders too. They restrict fluid flow in the transmission to cause a braking action.

    I've noticed that in my truck, if I'm descending the pass with the Cruise Control off, the truck will pretty much run away like you describe. But, descending the same grade with the Cruise Control on, the transmission will automatically downshift when I reach approximately ten MPH over what the cruise is set. This raises the RPMs and accentuates the engine braking effect slowing the truck. This is without using the Tow/Haul button which seems to be somewhat more aggressive, particularly when you tap the brake.

    Don't the folks over in the UK rate engines in Brake Horse Power (bhp)? I thought that I read this is the braking effect of the engine when the throttle is closed after revving it to red line. This may have been applied to motorcycles. I don't know if the two measures, theirs and ours, give similar numbers.
     
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