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1st Gen Tundra - do Lexus LX450 wheels fit?

Discussion in '1st Gen Tundras (2000-2006)' started by RockGuy, Jan 7, 2021.

  1. Jan 7, 2021 at 9:02 AM
    #1
    RockGuy

    RockGuy [OP] New Member

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    Hi all,

    New member here. I bought a mostly-stock 2003 Tundra Limited 4x4 TRD last summer with 52,000 miles on it, and I'm slowly working on upgrading it.

    I just got some 16" Lexus LX450 wheels and am hoping that I can fit these on my Tundra. Does anyone have experience with the fitment of these? Do they require spacers?
    IMG_0293.jpg IMG_0584.jpg
    wheels comparison.jpg
    I hope that I'm not duplicating someone else's question. I did search through other forums but I couldn't find a conclusive answer. Any guidance is much appreciated!
     
    KNABORES likes this.
  2. Jan 7, 2021 at 9:56 AM
    #2
    KNABORES

    KNABORES New-ish Member

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    Bilstein 5100's 16x8 589's with 265/75/16 and 1.25" spacers Flowmaster 50 series over the axle dump Westin bull bar with 20" LED Pioneer touchscreen with backup camera Full interior and dash LED conversion Trailer brake controller with 7 pin Bedliner coat bumpers trim and tool box
    These fit

    Capture3.jpg
     
  3. Jan 7, 2021 at 1:28 PM
    #3
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Center Bores are different. Our Wheels are Hub Centric. Maybe a Hub Spacer can make it happen.
     
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  4. Jan 7, 2021 at 2:26 PM
    #4
    FirstGenVol

    FirstGenVol Allergic to Darkness....

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    Too many
    I can't answer you question but that sounds like a great find. Congrats!
     
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  5. Jan 9, 2021 at 3:42 PM
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    RockGuy

    RockGuy [OP] New Member

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    Thanks everyone for the feedback.

    I just had a local tire shop test fit one of the wheels, and the hub bore appears to be the same, even though the specs for the wheels reports they should be bigger. I even ordered in some hub spacers to convert 110 mm to 106mm and these were too big for the LX wheels.

    However, the LX wheels scrape the front brake caliper just a bit on the inside front of the wheel. So I am considering ordering some Spidertrax WHS007 1.25" wheel spacers. Does anyone have any objections/recommendations for these wheel spacers?
     
  6. Jan 9, 2021 at 4:56 PM
    #6
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Many here do not like them. Some have them and say they are ok. I ordered some of those same brand to put my Golden Hands on them first and sent them back without installing. Felt like Bad Mojo. Your call.
     
  7. Jan 9, 2021 at 11:49 PM
    #7
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    Just curious, why did you feel the spacers were bad mojo? Was it the brand or the idea of putting spacers on there?
    I'm looking to add some spacers to a 1st Gen Sequoia in order to run a little bigger tire. Lots of folks running spacers on the Gen 3 trucks (and lots of other trucks for that matter) with zero issues. Spidertrax and BORA are the preferred brands.
     
  8. Jan 10, 2021 at 5:38 AM
    #8
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Good question. I’ll skip the wheel bearing and push up analogies (saw you already read in your other post) and cut straight to the fact the spacer nuts don’t seat down inside the spacer holes (like the OEM Acorn Nuts design does). There is a gap (large) between the nut and face of the rotor leaving 3/4”-1” length of stud as a stress point. I probed depths and measured scientifically. I’m not a scientist and can only go on common sense. I realize others feel safe with using spacers. I personally do not based on the reason above.

    We had one member with spacers lose a front wheel just driving down a residential street. Nobody was hurt, but I can imagine what a loose wheel would do if it hit someone. The members lug posts didn’t break, but all the 6 nuts somehow came off simultaneously and were found in the intersection. Not sure what happened there.


    Like I said. Its your call. Plenty of others around here have them and will validate you using them for you.
     
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  9. Jan 10, 2021 at 6:53 AM
    #9
    KNABORES

    KNABORES New-ish Member

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    Grinding the caliper to clear the wheels may be the better option if you're not wanting to run spacers for other reasons. I've run some 1.25" spacers on my truck for 100k+ miles with no issues. The spacers set the wheels just at the edge of my factory fender flares.
     
  10. Jan 10, 2021 at 11:42 AM
    #10
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    I was only asking if you had a valid reason for not using them on the Gen 1s specifically, if not then I'll move along.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2021 at 12:17 PM
    #11
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    I gave you a valid reason because you asked. You asked two separate questions and got 2 valid answers. Next time I’ll not answer your question with a valid non-answer. Sound fair?
     
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  12. Jan 10, 2021 at 12:19 PM
    #12
    Do58

    Do58 New Member

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  13. Jan 10, 2021 at 12:52 PM
    #13
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    Well, neither of the reasons you gave against using spacers is valid, so not sure what you mean.
    Something about push-ups and leverage points (and now you've jumped to lug nuts not seating correctly?), all of which have been disproven time and again. And someone not tightening their lug nuts, who just happened to have spacers? You can't honestly expect folks to believe that spacers caused all 6 lug nuts to just magically fall off at the same time, can you? Do you really think that?
    If you'd like me to explain how your push-up analogy is flawed please ask, otherwise I'm going to go do something more productive.
    Like I said earlier, so much disinformation in this thread I'm sorry I even brought it up. (Actually, that was the other thread, but still applies here)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2021
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  14. Jan 11, 2021 at 2:45 PM
    #14
    rock climber

    rock climber New Member

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    I've had those same spacers for over a year and done at least 5 trips to Moab and 20,000 miles and have zero complaints. Just make sure they are torqued correctly.

    Now to throw a wrench into the mix, I tried those same Landcruiser wheels with the 1.25 spacer and got lots of tire shake. I'm pretty sure the wheels you have require the 1.5 wheel spacers without the lip. http://www.spidertrax.com/Toyota-1-1-2-Wheel-Spacers?sc=2&category=9989

    I ended up selling the Landcruiser wheels and got newish 4runner wheels with the 1.25 spacers and no more tire shake.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021 at 9:32 AM
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  15. Feb 22, 2021 at 5:47 PM
    #15
    RockGuy

    RockGuy [OP] New Member

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    So after further deliberation I've decided to try installing 1/2-inch longer extended lug nuts (made by Supreme Suspensions) and order some custom 6 or 8 mm hub-centric spacers to get the clearance that I need. I haven't decided where to order the spacers from, but it looks like there a few options out there (US Wheel Adapters was the first one I came across). Then I may grind the caliper a bit if I need a bit more clearance.

    I haven't found any other examples of doing this particular setup yet. Thoughts?

    @rock climber: what size tires did you run on your setup?
     
  16. Feb 22, 2021 at 8:21 PM
    #16
    HBTundra

    HBTundra New Member

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    Ummmm, neither of his reasons were valid? ppffftttt. . . If you've already talked yourself into "Wheel Spacers" and are just asking opinions to justify your purchase and don't get the answer you're looking for, well, I've got nothing for you. I had a wheel come off in similar fashion as @Professional Hand Model described, it was on a boat trailer that got a flat. My friend had a spare tire/wheel that fit my lug pattern to get me home, however the 'seating' of the wheel to lug nut was off & I had no way of knowing at the time, (I'm not a wheel to lug-nut expert). I tork'd everything very tight with a breaker bar prior to getting on the road. Got on the freeway and noticed a horrible wobble . . . immediately pulled onto the off-ramp . . . made the turn and the tire flew off . . . I was on a set of train tracks . . . I punched it and drug the boat / trailer rig grinding on the hub with sparks flying & all. Pulled over to fetch the spare and the railroad arm came down 'ding-ding-ding-ding' . . . as the AMTRAK blew by me at 50+ mph. Had I stopped on the tracks my whole rig & I would've been splattered all over the place.
    If you wanna mess around with wheels that don't fit, modify / grind brake calipers, so they do, or put glorified 'shims' so you can get some chrome lexus spinners on your 'truck', go for it. I think the advice given here was from a conservative & practical point of view with reliability and safety in mind. There's plenty of dudes here who've successfully ran them . . . so run 'em. I'll pass.
     
  17. Feb 22, 2021 at 8:22 PM
    #17
    1stgentundradriver

    1stgentundradriver New Member

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  18. Feb 22, 2021 at 8:26 PM
    #18
    1stgentundradriver

    1stgentundradriver New Member

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    Not sure where everything went that I just wrote.

    @OnespeedTRD I’m guessing PHM hasn’t run them on his truck? Again, just a guess. Good to have information from someone who has directly experienced their effect both good and bad. I’ve heard both, obviously if you can get it to fit without a spacer then that’s good. There are tire and wheel threads to look for information on too. I too, would like to know whether they are a good idea or not for my Gen 1.
     
  19. Feb 22, 2021 at 8:55 PM
    #19
    RockGuy

    RockGuy [OP] New Member

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    I'm not sure if you're confusing my posts for others. I have read both positive and negative reviews of wheel spacers, and appreciate all of the input from both sides of this discussion.

    For clarification, there are two kinds of spacers, bolt-on spacers versus slip-on spacers (aka shims). I am hoping to install hub-centric slip-on wheel spacers, which I have not found for sale at a retailer anywhere but can be custom ordered. As I don't think that I need 1.25-1.5 more inches of clearance, and I would also like to be able to easily monitor my lug nuts, I figured that using extended lug nuts and slip-on spacers would allow me to forego the additional bolts and screws that come with the larger bolt-on wheel spacers.

    FYI I am not installing 'chrome spinners' as I am having the wheels powder coated, though hadn't specified this before as I didn't think it was relevant to my original question...
     
  20. Feb 23, 2021 at 1:50 AM
    #20
    tvpierce

    tvpierce Formerly New Member

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    Those look great. I have a new favorite OEM wheel on a Tundra! Are they from an LX or a Land Cruiser? Do they require spacers?
     
  21. Feb 23, 2021 at 4:30 AM
    #21
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Of course I haven’t run them on my truck as you should be able to read. Also, I will never run them on my truck after having a set in my Hands. I will say I love the look that the Spacers give with a wider stance. If you feel comfy with them as others do, then by all means put them on.

    To anyone else reading, the thing that is slightly annoying is when someone asks a question and they get an answer they do not like or is counter to what they ‘want’ to hear. I enjoy hearing things I don’t like before making a major decision.

    Outside of Spacers being ‘safe’, I wonder how well they do in terms of balance? Seems these like to wobble a bit at highway speed from a few people I know. Makes sense since you are adding 6lbs per axle hub.
     
  22. Feb 23, 2021 at 4:44 AM
    #22
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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    Yeah. That ‘Seating’ of the Lug is what I’m talking about. The Nut like a cone shape fitting down onto a flat rim of a surface on the Spacer. The nut/lug tension is on very small area way out away from the hub.

    To me it seems that design puts stress on the lug post itself. I’d feel very comfortable if the Nuts were an Acorn Style like our OEM Nuts. In other words, the Nuts seat down into the Spacer filling the gap and acting as bushings inside vs. a nut tension fit out and away on a small rim of metal.
     
  23. Feb 23, 2021 at 4:49 AM
    #23
    Professional Hand Model

    Professional Hand Model A.K.A ‘Golden Hands’

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  24. Feb 23, 2021 at 9:34 AM
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    rock climber

    rock climber New Member

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    I think the easiest route is just to go with the 1.5 spidertax spacers though.
     
  25. Feb 23, 2021 at 10:06 AM
    #25
    1stgentundradriver

    1stgentundradriver New Member

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    Thanks for your help.
     
  26. Feb 24, 2021 at 6:47 PM
    #26
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    Wow, I forgot about this thread. For PHM, I only asked if your comment about spacers was specific to the brand, or the 1st Gen Tundra, or if you were a never-spacer. You're obviously a never-spacer, and no one is going to talk you out of that, so rock on.

    For HBTundra, no, none of PHM's reasons are valid. This debate has been going on for decades, and the main detractors have always been the same, wheel bearings, wheels falling off or wheel balancing issues due to poor interface, or spacers exploding. Each of those have been debunked, or proven to be non-issues with the use of a high quality, properly fitted spacer. Putting a the wrong wheel on your trailer and then have it fail on you is in no way a realistic testimony against using wheel spacers for desired fitment. If you had understood the basics of wheel/hub fitment you would have known that wasn't going to turn out well.

    Since I'm just waiting on dinner to be delivered I'll break each one down.

    Myth 1: Spacers destroy wheel bearings. A 1.5" spacer might put enough extra stress on the wheel bearings to fail at 99k miles instead of 100k miles. Hardly a major deal, as aftermarket wheels with more offset will do the exact same thing. For PHM's push-up analogy to be relevant you'd have to be running like 3 foot spacers. A more realistic comparison would be to do push-ups with your arms straight under you, then move them outboard 1.5mm and see if you notice a difference. Hell, even move your arms out 1.5 inches, which is still totally not to scale between a human body and a full size truck, but hopefully you get the point. The push-up analogy is a gross exaggeration of what's happening on the truck.

    Myth 2: Spacers make your wheels fall off. Any improper wheel/hub interface will cause your wheel to fall off. Mounting any wheel or spacer without the proper hub bore, bolt pattern or lug nuts is not going to be safe, regardless of whether you can get it to "fit" or not. Again, a high quality spacer built specifically for your application, and properly mounted, will not be any less safe than your stock wheel. The lug nut comparison above does not hold water either. As long as the type of lug nut matches the lug bore it will be just fine, even more so if running a hub centric setup. Lug nut type becomes more important if running a lug-centric setup. Either way, that nut in the top photo looks to be maybe a Porsche or Mercedes ball seat... they don't make crappy, unsafe stuff.

    Myth 3: Wheel spacers explode under load. Sure, crappy cast aluminum spacers that cost $40 from Amazon will probably fall apart on the first big hit. Billet spacers with high quality studs and lugs are likely stronger than most wheels out there. On a big hit a high-end spacer like the BORA or Spidertrax, again, if properly installed, will not be any more prone to fail than your wheel. If its bad enough to make the spacer fail then your wheel is probably toast too, and your suspension, and maybe some body panels.

    I wasn't looking for validation on my decision, or whether spacers in general are good or bad. I already know the answer to that.
    I didn't push back because I didn't like the answer, I pushed back because I don't like when folks go around spreading misinformation and go all chicken little about stuff like this, and then act as if their opinion is the only correct opinion, and anyone that disagrees is just looking to validate their own incorrect opinion or stance on the subject. If you prefaced your comments with, "in my opinion" and left it at that, then I'd be more willing to let it go. But to accuse others with differing opinions, or who present actual information counter to your opinion as just looking to justify their stance is just irritating. And then to disparage someone's decision, as HBTundra did, because you don't agree with them (more accurate to say you don't really know what you're talking about) is just plain old disrespectful and kinda pisses me off.
     
  27. Feb 24, 2021 at 7:29 PM
    #27
    HBTundra

    HBTundra New Member

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    Nice . . . . well . . . if I was considering something 'significant' with regards to running gear, drivetrain, etc. etc. where I felt compelled to ask others opinions on-line extensively, I'd tend to error on the side of caution & common sense. But you do you buddy. From my 'simplistic' take . . . if I'm modifying a truck that will be performing 'truck-tasks' IE towing, hauling, trailering, light off-roading, etc. my main focus will be to insure that I'm not compromising the trucks ability to perform any of the said tasks.
    If I'm just using the truck to commute to and from work, maybe hauling my hand-tools etc. and I want the look of a cool lift with nice wheels and tires, then that would be my jam too. (not saying that's your case just an example).

    A while back I was at the Terrible Herbst off road racing teams headquarters. The guys there were super nice and gave me a really in depth tour of the facility and showed me a couple of the pre-runner trucks, and 1 of their actual race trucks. Talk about a reality check, pretty amazing and humbling how much they have to 'over-build' and engineer things to withstand the punishment those trucks take. I spent over an hour in there asking all kinds of questions and looking around . . . If my memory serves me correct, I don't remember seeing a set of wheel spacers anywhere. ;-)
     
  28. Feb 24, 2021 at 7:34 PM
    #28
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    The slip on type spacers you're looking at should work for the amount of space you're looking for. I ran some 5mm H&R spacers on my SL55 so I could squeeze a wider tire on the rear and they worked fine. Check out H&R, they may have some to fit your application, high quality German-made stuff.
    When you say you're looking at extended lug nuts, do you mean pressing extended studs into the hub? You'll lose stud length equal to the width of the spacer, so you may need longer studs to have enough thread remaining to be safe, usually about 8-9 turns minimum to get proper torque. You can measure it by taking stud length minus stud bore width, minus spacer width and seeing how much stud is remaining. If its enough to get enough turns on the lug nut then you should be good. If you can't then you'd need longer studs pressed into the hubs.
     
  29. Feb 24, 2021 at 7:43 PM
    #29
    OnespeedTRD

    OnespeedTRD New Member

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    275/70r18 Cooper AT3 XLT on 18x9 SCS Ray 10s, DD 10" Exhaust, AJT Blackout Kit, Truxedo Pro X15, Cali-raised Ditch Lights, paint match and chrome delete.
    Probably because they have a giant budget and 20 sets of wheels for each truck of various widths and offsets to run different tires for different track setups. Not necessarily an indicator of spacers being inherently unsafe. Again, an anecdotal example that doesn't prove/disprove anything one way or the other. Spacers were made for the rest of us that don't have the budget of a world-class Baja outfit. Just don't cheap out on them and install them correctly and you'll be just fine doing "truck-tasks".
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2021 at 8:02 PM
    rock climber likes this.
  30. Feb 25, 2021 at 6:20 AM
    #30
    KNABORES

    KNABORES New-ish Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2020
    Member:
    #40572
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    586
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    2000 Limited TRD Access cab
    Bilstein 5100's 16x8 589's with 265/75/16 and 1.25" spacers Flowmaster 50 series over the axle dump Westin bull bar with 20" LED Pioneer touchscreen with backup camera Full interior and dash LED conversion Trailer brake controller with 7 pin Bedliner coat bumpers trim and tool box
    Problem free use of 1.25" wheel spacers for the last 130,000+ miles. Doing all manner of truck stuff. Literally no problems whatsoever. They've been on there for 14 years. No problems whatsoever. They set the tires right at the edge of the fender flare, just the look I wanted. Zero problems. Been through 4 sets of tires with them on, No tire shop has ever complained about them, my wheel bearings have not failed prematurely (they are the originals front and rear and have 259,000 miles on them now. Towed a 7,000 pound trailer for several years, No. Problems. At. All. My experience anyway.
     

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